Resistant Starch?

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constantpain
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Date Joined Mar 2013
Total Posts : 36
   Posted 9/16/2017 12:15 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Sunnygirl,
I just wanted you to know that if you couldnt start on a biologic that Sulfasalazine is a good option. Im on medicare here in the States and it doesnt pay for biologics here and very expensive to buy. The next option was Sulfasalazine and i hurt so bad i decided to try it. First of all its cheap and easily given by docotors and stocked in Pharmacies. It took me a month of taking it to get used to it. It will make you very sick feeling for about a month. And it takes several months to kick in. about the time your going to want to give up on it is when one day you will have less pain. My spouse came home everyday and i would be in the same spot as when he left and boy it will make you stomach burn but eventually you will get better. I have been on it for over 2 years and it quit working as good so now I went through Amgens foundation and there giving me a years supply of Enbrel. Heres what I was getting to that I have been injecting it for 3 months and it hasnt helped me yet. I keep reading on the subject and they say it could be up to 6 months. I am also taking the potato starch for 3 months too. The funny thing is when it helps I wont know which one is helping. I will have to go by how I feel. Also I have to tell you that my toes still deformed while on Sulfasalazine so maybe not as strong as a biologic. I sure wish that we all had accses to same meds that people with good insurance has. So maybe this information will help you some

pedidiva
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 39
   Posted 9/17/2017 8:15 AM (GMT -6)   
HI Scott~~

I have enjoyed this thread. I am on a ketogenic diet and implement therapeutic extended fasting (like 72 hours/week) as a way to decrease pain and inflammation (CD4, CD8, and interleukin 6) for my RA. It has been helpful. I have started the resisitant starch.

My question is this: With keto (when one is in ketosis), beta hydroxybutyrate increases (as well as some other ketones). Does the Beta hydroxybutyrate via biochemical pathways become butyrate?

Thanks

Pedi

moosie
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2013
Total Posts : 26
   Posted 9/17/2017 4:45 PM (GMT -6)   
Scott007
Have to laugh at myself. I was worried about Meloxicam causing bleeding and or blood clots so was to start Celebrex and it has heart attack warnings along with others. Is there a special blood test I should as for or just ask GP for a blood test to detect ra?
Tried again to stop Meloxicam and again the pain was becoming intense , took 5 hours before I felt better. This stuff is so frustrating!!!!! Please people keep making comments because I really need guidance good or bad Meaning what drugs or food to stay away from. Thanks again. You all help the newbies.

Scott007
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2017
Total Posts : 74
   Posted 9/19/2017 12:03 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi Moosie,

When you informed on your Sept 15th post that the doctor put you on Celebrex, I have to apologize that I did not advise you of the cardiac risk with this drug. There have been many lawsuits filed against Merck over this side effect. It was an embarrassment for the FDA as well which was forced to admit negligence in the approval of this drug. After so many suggestions that people read the Drug Product Sheets and Black Box Warnings, I have become a bit worn out.

Okay, there are specific blood tests for RA which I will mention below. Before delving into that, my STRONG suggestion is that you get a FULL blood profile - cells counts, electrolytes, lipid profile, renal profile, liver function, comprehensive metabolic panel (includes blood glucose) - and FULL urinalysis profile. You had mentioned many different conditions in your first post on this thread. I just get the sense that your GP is treating one condition at a time, as opposed to analyzing the BIG picture. Maybe it is time to get a different GP as well.

Some of the specific tests for RA include antibodies (rheumatoid factor, anti-CCP) and inflammatory markers (CRP, calprotectin).

moosie
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2013
Total Posts : 26
   Posted 9/19/2017 8:24 PM (GMT -6)   
Scott007
Thank you so much for verifying what I thought I'd found. about. Celebre. I have thought about new doc but in Sequim it is getting difficult to find drs, that take Medicare. I know how tiring it must be for you to advise all of us, but frankly we'd be lost without your in site. Dr did do 2 ra tests today. Lab said it would be 7-10 days for results. Anyway thanks for always showing an interest and trying to help. Moosie

Scott007
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2017
Total Posts : 74
   Posted 9/20/2017 3:43 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi Moosie,

Actually, it is the healthcare system that is tiring for me. It is the doctor's responsibility to inform patients of Black Box warnings and many do not. When they do inform, the seriousness of those side effects is often not stressed enough.

It is good that you had 2 tests for RA done today. Regardless of those results, a full blood and urine work up has merit given the Factor V and the history with the heel melanoma.

Our overall health has deteriorated in the past 30 - 40 years as evidenced by the marked increase in autoimmune disorders, diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. There is overwhelming evidence in the scientific literature indicating that many of these disorders are the result of a dysfunctional colon. So, starting the potato starch is so important. The drugs only treat the symptoms, and the side effects of some drugs are worse than the disorder itself.

Best wishes to you!

Scott007
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2017
Total Posts : 74
   Posted 9/21/2017 2:35 AM (GMT -6)   
Here is an experiment that all of you can do. At the bottom of this page, there is a box entitled "Who's Online". In that box, click on the link for "Details". In the page that pops up, you can view all of the threads that are being viewed at any particular time.

At the time of writing this post, there is quite a mix. However, many times during the day there is a clear "over-representation" in 3 forums in particular: Ulcerative Colitis, Crohn's Disease, and Irritable Bowel Syndrome. All 3 are colonic dysfunctions. Statistical aberration? Not likely.

I read this mini-review today: "Cellular metabolism in colorectal carcinogenesis: Influence of lifestyle,
gut microbiome and metabolic pathways"
http://www.cancerletters.info/article/S0304-3835(14)00133-5/pdf

While this article mentions that specific strains of microorganisms may increase the susceptibility to colorectal cancer, it is the discussion of metabolism that is most relevant. I am quite certain that most rheumatologists would have a difficult time to understand the science in this article. So, I do not expect any of you to understand it either and will highlight the important findings:
"The fact that the microbiota found in the colon is enriched for genes involved in energy production and extraction, in which carbohydrate metabolism is particularly overrepresented in the family of glycoside hydrolases and polysaccharide lyases [77], begs the question of how these particular microbiota influence colon cell metabolism. Dietary carbohydrates, specifically starches and fiber, are substrates for fermentation by microbes in the colon, which results in short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as acetate, propionate and butyrate [78]."

There is a discussion of the ‘‘Warburg effect’’ regarding metabolism in cancer cells:
"This theory has later been disproven, as most tumor cells still harbor functional mitochondria and use oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis to support cell growth [89,90]. However, the observation of higher glucose flux through cancer cells remains valid..."

This really is they key here! When the level of butyrate is "chronically" held at a low level (due to insufficient resistant starch in the diet), the colon is "forced" to shift from its "preferred" butyrate metabolism to glucose metabolism.

The last section on "The Butyrate Paradox" provides an additional, but very important clue:
It has been "observed that the concentration limit for butyrate metabolism was 2 mM in colon cancer cells [107]. Higher concentrations of butyrate were not metabolized but accumulated intracellularly in the nucleus to work directly as histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACs) [106,107], causing epigenetic changes that turned on genes that regulate apoptosis rather than inducing proliferation [106]."

Even though this paper refers to cancer cells, the same is true for normal cells as well with respect to intracellular butyrate concentrations. Beyond a certain concentration (here cited to be 2 millimolar), the butyrate is not metabolized but accumulates in the nucleus of the cell acting as an inhibitor of HDACs.

It should come as no surprise based on this article that HDAC inhibitors are one of the latest drug targets for anti-cancer therapy by pharmaceutical companies. What may come as a surprise is that HDAC inhibitors are currently in clinical trials for RA as well! However, there is a reason why drugs ultimately fail in treating RA effectively: an HDAC inhibitor would likely provide some relief for RA, but it will not shift the metabolic pathway in colonic cells back to "butyrate". Thus, the dysfunction persists.

This also explains why 1) it takes months for potato starch to exert beneficial effects in RA and 2) why it takes large amounts of daily dietary consumption. In other words, it can take months for the butyrate concentration to build up within the colonic cells to the point where 1) it once again becomes the primary metabolic pathway, and 2) the concentration "spills over" the metabolic threshold and begins to accumulate in the nucleus of the cell.

I have tried to take a quite complex scientific article and reduce it to terms that a "non-scientist" can understand. The goal here is not to blindly accept resistant starch as a therapy for autoimmune disorders, but to understand the cause of colonic dysfunction and how it relates to autoimmune disorders.

moosie
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2013
Total Posts : 26
   Posted 9/21/2017 10:54 AM (GMT -6)   
Scott007
Where would we be without you....I keep re-reading your comments as every time I pick up a little more information.
The 1st RA test came back as negative - I believe that might be the RA factor, the lab said it would be 7-10 days before all testing is done.
Can anyone out there give me the name of a good RA doctor in Seattle, WA. As I go through the information on the screen, I think I have found a good dr and as I read more I find very severe negative comments. As my grandma once said, "You might find a few people who don't like a doctor, but if quite a few make severe comments on a particular doctor, keep looking." I can handle receptionists that are grumpy or rude, but not doctors or their assistants. I want someone who will listen.

moosie
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2013
Total Posts : 26
   Posted 9/22/2017 11:26 AM (GMT -6)   
Scott007
I AM SO FRUSTRATED.....
As I said before. Rheumatoid Factor was negative.
ccp antibodies, igg iga was negative with a 3.
I don't want to be sick, I just want to know why I hurt so bad, feel so crappy, and am so tired. I'm sure doctor feels I am a hypochondriac.
Keeps saying it is because I am still 80 pounds overweight.
I believe GOD brings people into our lives for a purpose and that is why I found you and all the others that write in. However I seem to be wasting your time when you could be helping someone else.. I will stay on my potato starch and keep trying to lose weight. Oh, Dr said all blood work came back normal.
Hoping all of you get the answers you need. Thanks again. moosie

Scott007
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2017
Total Posts : 74
   Posted 9/22/2017 1:34 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Moosie,

No, it is not a waste of my time at all! If I can help, then it is time well spent.

Stay the course and don't give up. Don't worry about what the doctor may think. You are the best judge of how you feel. When you say that "all blood work came back normal", was it the full panel of tests including electrolytes, renal function, lipid profile, liver function, metabolic panel, etc.?

There is a big positive here - you are negative for Rheumatoid Factor and anti-CCP. It is good that chose to stay on the potato starch. Just take enough and take it every day. I was reading some of the posts on the Ulcerative Colitis page. I was amazed at how long some people go without making a bowel movement. Every morning I make enough poop to make an elephant blush and enough gas throughout the day to fill up a hot air balloon! Your previous bouts with IBS and constipation indicate some colonic dysfunction.

You will get better. Do not lose faith!

Scott007
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2017
Total Posts : 74
   Posted 9/28/2017 4:51 AM (GMT -6)   
Did anyone watch the health care debate on CNN a couple days ago? I watched it Live and it was painful. Four US Senators debated the future of health care at a CNN town hall in Washington. The highlights of this debate were posted on the CNN YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8tN85JhNSKE

There was an elephant in the room that politicians are not talking about: the trends in health disorders.

The CDC has a webpage entitled "National Diabetes Prevention Program"
https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/prevention/prediabetes-type2/index.html

This is what they state:
"Diabetes is currently the seventh leading cause of death in the United States—and studies show that deaths related to diabetes may be under-reported! Today, 1 in 10 U.S. adults has diabetes, and if trends continue, 1 in 5 will have it by 2025.

An additional 86 million U.S. adults—1 in 3—have prediabetes, which means their blood sugar is higher than normal, but not high enough to be considered type 2 diabetes. Without intervention, many people with prediabetes could develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years..."

86 million are prediabetic! And the trend is not isolated to diabetes. Here is an article from "Clinical Medicine Insights: Gastroenterology":
"Inflammatory Bowel Disease: An Expanding Global Health Problem"
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4020403/pdf/cgast-6-2013-033.pdf

They state:
"It is now clear that IBD is increasing worldwide and has become a global emergence disease. IBD, which includes Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), has been considered a problem in industrial-urbanized societies and attributed largely to a Westernized lifestyle and other associated environmental factors. Its incidence and prevalence in developing countries is steadily rising and has been attributed to the rapid modernization and Westernization of the population."

The FDA just approved the first gene therapy: https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm574058.htm

If you think biologics are expensive, you are in for "sticker shock" regarding gene therapy. This article out recently in The New York Times:

"New Gene-Therapy Treatments Will Carry Whopping Price Tags"
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/11/health/cost-gene-therapy-drugs.html?mcubz=3

The cost of 1 person on gene therapy is equivalent to 30 - 70 people on biologics for one year, depending on the particular gene therapy.

Regardless of which health care system is chosen by the politicians, there is simply no way to pay for these spiraling costs. I applaud the CDC for their website to bring awareness. There is only one way to reverse the trends in illness and the associated costs - Preventative Medicine!

moosie
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2013
Total Posts : 26
   Posted 9/28/2017 10:11 AM (GMT -6)   
Scott007
Thank you for bringing this to my attention. It is one thing I really keep an eye on. I go in for 6 month check-in with endocrinologist and he frowned as I didn't have a weight loss, and commented on the fact. I told him carbs were almost non existent in my eating. So did blood work and he commented to me later that blood sugars were lower than last time, keep up the good work. So, now I know it takes diet, exercise, lots of water and good people to keep you on track. I so appreciate you and this forum with people that are not afraid to expose themselves to help others. So I keep watching sugars, fats, exercise 5 days and aim for 7, AND keep taking my potato starch because by the new year I will notice a difference. Thanks Scott.

Scott007
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2017
Total Posts : 74
   Posted 9/28/2017 11:00 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi Moosie,

I am sooo glad to hear from you!!! It sounds like your determination and spirit have been rejuvenated! It is so important to believe in yourself.

It is great to hear that you are still taking the potato starch. Just as a reminder, make sure you get enough (>100 grams, which is about a coffee mug filled halfway) and take it every day. In a few days, I will post a few publications from medical science journals on the findings that potato starch lowers blood glucose and maintains insulin sensitivity.

On the Crohn's forum, I read today about a 15-year old girl that was diagnosed with this terrible condition. These gastrointestinal disorders (along with diabetes) keep creeping down into lower and lower age groups. The incidence of many of these conditions in the population has doubled or tripled in the past 3 - 4 decades. Despite this, many are still convinced that genetics is the cause. While genetics may play a part, it does not explain the doubling and tripling in the number of cases in just a matter of decades. Human genetics changes on a geologic timescale, not on a decade timescale.

moosie
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2013
Total Posts : 26
   Posted 9/28/2017 11:18 AM (GMT -6)   
Scott007
Thanks for the info, so 1/2 coffee cup, = 1/2cup? Some loose stools, should I go to 1/3 cup for a couple weeks? Then 2/3 cup. Need to keep swimming..... Moosie

Scott007
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2017
Total Posts : 74
   Posted 9/28/2017 11:34 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi Moosie,

Yes, a coffee mug is a good approximation for a measuring cup. You can certainly dial it back to 1/3 cup for a while. When you say "loose stools", do you mean diarrhea or just soft? My experience was that the loose stools lasted for a few weeks. I have been taking no less than about 140 grams for 2 years now and my stools are always soft, no hard balls anymore. On some days, I get ambitious and take it twice as much for a total of more than 250 grams. The Hazda tribe in Tanzania consumes between 300 and 500 grams per day. They start this at 3-4 years of age.

Ciarraibleu
New Member


Date Joined Oct 2017
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 10/5/2017 11:36 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Scott007, you said above that eating the starch is about the same thing as a potato a day, why not just eat a potato a day?

(Hi Moosie - I love Sequim, banana belt of WA! My mom used to live there, beautiful area!)

I am 56 diagnosed with RA 3 yrs ago, but I had a feeling before that. All tests are neg except the anti ccp @ >250
I have ulnar drift in both hands, but in my mind I believe it is mild, I can still use my hands but my typing speed sucks, my fingers are in the wrong positions now, lol (I'm a bookkeeper - yikes!)

I refused all RX until a minor back injury when I was given prednisone for the inflammation. I was just amazed at how I felt and asked my Dr to let me keep taking it @ 5mg daily
She said yes only if I promise to go see a rheumatologist. I did and the rheumy immediately wanted to up my pred to 20mg and put me on methotrexate. When I told her that I was not ready for meth or biologics or dmards yet, I was made fun of, dismissed and basically told that I was an idiot and my tendons in my hands were going to rupture eventually.
I left the office in tears but I was more determined than ever to try other things first.

Both knees are very painful, but I have recently started deep water exercise and that has helped a little. It's very hard getting out of bed in the morning, but I still don't believe I am ready for those nasty rx at this point in my life.

Now I am at 7mg pred but I am also taking many natural things, boswellia, krill oil, sour cherry extract, turmeric, probiotics. potassium, vit D and vit C -
In your opinion, do those actually do anything? I did try to look up studies to support the health claims but it's hard to trust what's on the internet.

Post Edited (Ciarraibleu) : 10/6/2017 12:03:04 AM (GMT-6)


Scott007
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2017
Total Posts : 74
   Posted 10/6/2017 3:04 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi Ciarraibleu,

The difference between raw potato starch and a "cooked" potato is that the raw potato starch cannot be digested (hence the term "resistant"), but cooking makes it digestible. In cooling, some of the potato starch reverts back to the resistant form, but this is only about 10%. The raw form is about 80% resistant, but it is not resistant to digestion by microbes in the colon.

There are many that claim autoimmune disorders are "genetic". While this may be true for a small percentage of cases, the vast majority are due to environmental factor(s). How do I know this? In genetic conditions, the percentage in the population does not change over time. Hemophilia is a prime example. In contrast, the incidence of many autoimmune disorders has doubled and some have tripled over the last 40 years. If you are old enough, you may recall the craze when obesity was considered "genetic". As the percentage of people with obesity has increased dramatically in the last 40 years, you don't hear dieticians claiming genetics anymore! The latest official figure places 37% of Americans as "clinically" obese.

What is the environmental factor? In legal parlance, there is a term called "preponderance of evidence" in convicting someone of a crime. After working for 23 years in the pharmaceutical industry as a PhD organic chemist, the "preponderance of evidence" clearly indicates that colonic dysfunction is the root cause of autoimmune disorders. More specifically, it is an energy or metabolic imbalance in colonic cells. Since many here are not organic chemists, let me explain in different terms. If you have a gasoline-powered automobile and you start pumping diesel into the fuel mix, the engine may continue working, but not optimally. Over time, the engine will begin to sputter, and eventually, the engine will fail with 100% diesel. The preferred fuel for colonic cells is butyrate, but we have been pumping in glucose only. In fact, the optimal "mix" is 70% butyrate and 30% glucose (this was determined experimentally). Each organ of our body has unique "fuel" preferences. All of our organs get their "preferred" fuel from dietary sources, except for one - the colon. Butyrate is not found in dietary sources. This is the reason that we have 100 trillion bacteria in our colon - fermentation of resistant starch produces butyrate.

There are many that claim that diet does not work to "fix" autoimmune disorders, but do they explain "why". How many of these diets incorporate resistant starch (in sufficient quantities)? None! Paleo enthusiasts were anti-starch for many years and some have eased up and recognized the importance of RS. There are many that go gluten-free, dairy-free, lactose-free, etc., and get some relief, but for most, their autoimmunity persists.

Will the medical community ever recognize this? Maybe not. This is biochemistry (which is really organic chemistry). The pre-med curriculum requires undergraduate organic chemistry, but most doctors will tell you that they hated this course in college. Thus, one needs to find one of the few doctors that actually liked organic chemistry and understands it in order to have a meaningful discussion. What about the pharmaceutical industry? Well, there is no money to be made from marketing potato starch. Enough said!

We have become so conditioned as a society that drugs are the only option, that the basic science is ignored, and to some extent rejected. In fact, we have become addicted to drugs. It is not just the opioid epidemic. There are many that have become addicted to SSRI's and SNRI's - Zoloft, Cymbalta, etc. One of my best friends from college is a radiologist. He told me recently that he takes Zoloft (he writes his own prescriptions as a doctor). When I asked him if he was suffering from depression, he said "No". He said that he takes it because it "makes him feel good".

I wish you well and hope that this helps you in your decision-making process.

Scott007
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2017
Total Posts : 74
   Posted 10/6/2017 4:04 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi Ciarraibleu,

I just realized that I did not comment with respect to your inquiry regarding the natural supplements and vitamins that you are taking.

With respect to the natural supplements (boswellia, krill oil, sour cherry extract, turmeric), the krill oil contains omega-3 and there is clear scientific evidence that this is beneficial, especially in regards to cardiovascular function. As for the other natural supplements, I don't know much about them and therefore reserve comment.

As for probiotics, the scientific interest has grown dramatically in the past decade and benefits have been observed (e.g. fecal transplants). The concept behind probiotics is to enhance the growth of "good" bacteria at the expense of "bad" bacteria. There are some issues at the moment. How does one confirm that they are deficient in a particular species of bacteria? There are labs out there that will analyze your feces, but different labs can give different results based on various factors (e.g. the composition of the fecal sample changes during the transit time through the postal system and wait time in the queue at the facility). The bigger problem, as I see it, is the deficiency of prebiotics (i.e., resistant starch) that feed these bacteria. Without being fed, the good bacteria will not proliferate regardless of how much probiotic is pumped into the colon.

As for vitamin D and vitamin C, has it been determined that you are deficient in either of these? In the case of some vitamins and minerals, too much can be just as bad as too little. Selenium is a case in point. Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin and can accumulate in your fat deposits if you get too much. Vitamin C, on the other hand, is quite water-soluble and can be excreted. Diet is a big factor in estimating deficiency of a particular vitamin.

As for prednisone, chronic dosing increases your risk of "prednisone-induced" diabetes. It also causes weight gain, which has a whole host of problems as you know. So, it is best to jettison this if you can.

Post Edited (Scott007) : 10/6/2017 4:16:35 AM (GMT-6)


Ciarraibleu
New Member


Date Joined Oct 2017
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 10/6/2017 11:44 AM (GMT -6)   
Prednisone holds on to sodium but leeches potassium so I supplement with that and I live in Wa state, land of darkness, so I supplement with D, again only at approved amounts, none of the 2000% that some naturopaths selling supplements tell you.

If I have the choice I prefer to get my supplements from foods I eat but I'm not always good at that, I don't eat out, maybe once or twice a month, but I do cook too much box food which is something I am working on.

I think I will switch out the probiotic supplement with plain yoghurt and slowly add potato starch to see how well I "react" to it.
Hopefully start out at 1/3 cup (does how much water matter, and can drink smaller amounts throughout the day to equal 1/3 to 2/3 or should it be drunk all at once per day?

Also, what about eating raw potatoes? And can sweet potato be substituted? Or purple sweet potato, raw of course.

Post Edited (Ciarraibleu) : 10/6/2017 11:48:13 AM (GMT-6)


Scott007
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2017
Total Posts : 74
   Posted 10/6/2017 2:01 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Ciarraibleu,

Yes, most people "react" as you say to the potato starch. This stems from the fact that our colons have adapted (and in a negative manner I might add) to a very low exposure to resistant starch. Most of what we eat that we call "fiber" is not fermented (such as wheat bran in All-Bran cereal, the skins of apples, psyllium husk found in Metamucil, etc.). It has been estimated that the Western diet only provides between 2 - 10 grams of RS. So, starting out slow is a good idea.

After you increase it up to 2/3 cup, either should be fine - taking it all at once or breaking it up into smaller portions throughout the day.

Funny that you mention raw potatoes! I just started experimenting with eating raw white potatoes this week, in addition to the potato starch powder. I do remove the skin of the potato. I found the organic white potatoes were not as hard as the non-organic. I am thinking that the larger chunks from the raw potato may have a better chance of reaching the distal colon. This is where almost all colorectal cancer is found, which is where one would expect the bacteria to be most deprived of RS.

I don't know much about sweet potatoes and had to search a bit. From what I read, it "sounds" like there is much less RS than white potatoes. It "sounds" like they are high in fiber that is not fermented. So, you may want to do more research on that.

Ciarraibleu
New Member


Date Joined Oct 2017
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 10/6/2017 4:52 PM (GMT -6)   
Thanks, I used to hide in the root cellar as a child and eat up my mom's potatoes, i loved them raw! What I've read is that you should peel them, but I never did.
We grew white taters this year and used no pesticide so they are organic (I don't buy organic at the store, too expensive for our crowd.) so I will experiment eating them raw until I can get some tater starch

moosie
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2013
Total Posts : 26
   Posted 10/6/2017 5:55 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Ciarraibleu
I found what you said about prednisone and potassium very interesting. I had a conversation with my son, who has a back problem and his Dr put him on Prednisone without potassium and in the month he was on it he gained 20 pounds. So called him to verify my facts, and I asked him to read up on how the two effect each other. My cardiologist noticed my ankles were swollen and prescribed potassium at ( Klor-Con. M20 ER 20MEQ Tab ). She said
to take the Potassium with my hydochlorothiazide . I am taking 1/3 c of potato starch with water every day. I feel it won't hurt me and if what Scott says is right, which he is, as everything makes sense to me. So I can hardly wait for the new year and feeling better. I don't have any serious diarrhea so will take 1/3c in am and pm.
My mom had colon cancer - upper right part of colon, and what you said makes sense. I have to laugh at myself as my potato starch solidifies and needs stirring. Doesn't taste bad though.
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