Hi - New member - Bipolar spouse

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
[ << Previous Thread | Next Thread >> ]

mth
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 11/5/2008 5:45 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi, I am new here and I am living with a bipolar spouse.  I came here in order to understand other personal stories from people living with bipolar and people who live with bipolar spouses.  Even though my wife has been diagnosed with bipolar for about 3 years, I'm sure that the connection is genetic through her father's side of the family.  I decided to reach out as the symptoms are worsening pretty dramatically, and I am very scared of the future and more so after reading so many posts/stories about spouses living with bipolar.
 
We have been married four an a half years and, as long as I have know her, she has been very dramatic, sometimes moody, and suffered from minor OCD (bad thoughts vs. hoarding).  She had always managed everything without medication, although did work with her doctors (primary care) to try Zoloft, Wellbutrin, and Cymbalta.  These had pretty good effect and eliminated her bad thoughts.  She became pregnant and had to stop taking the meds, but no problem, as she was fine through the pregnancy and relatively happy.
 
The trouble started after my daughter was born. Through the post pardem period and thereafter, depression came out.  I think we all thought, meaning her and our family, presumed this was the usual effects after the pregnancy.  She became more depressed with the resuming of the bad thoughts as time went on.  The doctors placed her back on the Cymbalta.  That helped quite a bit for a couple months.  Then, she developed a new symptom, panic attacks.  At that point the PCP referred her to a Psychiatrist that made a diagnosis of Bipolar II (with OCD).   She was prescribe Prozac instead of Cymbalta.  That ended the panic attacks and she felt better and closer to normal for about 3 months.  Then a new symptom developed: Hallucinations. 
 
My wife sought a different Psychiatrist whose diagnosis was the same.  He did a comprehensive evaluation of family history, medical tests, MRI, and Bipolar II (with OCD) was still the answer.  We were thrilled that we had an answer to the depression and strange symptons occuring- and had an answer for the OCD.  The answer at that point was to put here on Cylexa (sp?).
 
That worked well for about three months until the condition seemed to evolve more.  She started to expirience mood swings in the form of slight mania and then depression again.  The doctor perscribed Abilify to help regulate her mood, with the Cylexa.  That threw my wife into a stronger mania on which she'd only sleep a couple hours, kept busy doing so many things in her social life, and kept this house spotless.  Unfortunately, when she was ready to buy a new car, we all realized, and the doctor too, that the manic condition was too severe.
 
After that, she tried many combinations of mood stabilizers and a major roller coaster that lasted months (this was this past winter).  It ended in a trip the the ER, and hospitialization as the depression and void that she felt led to a shut down and feelings of suicide.  The final mood stabilizer that she was on was Lamictal- which is typically a very good stabilizer and anti depressent.
 
After the hospital stay, they stabilized her medication by removing any mood stabilizers and started with a higher dose of Cylexa.  She has been using Kalonopin to help with stressful situations, regulating sleep, etc... She just about resumed normal life... enjoyed taking care of the daughter, started to work full-time at home in a telecommuting position and has been working out vigorously at the gym to regain her physique after her expirience with the mood stabilizers and weight gain.
 
It seems like we've had another evolution in her condition recenty.  After being fairly stable for about seven months, she expirienced hypo-mainia.  She has taken on so much responsibility in addition to her work and daughter, and just about going non-stop.  She's been more willing to spend money (traditionally a saver).  She hungs on the message boards and and with her busy life style, there was little time for our relationship.  When I wanted to spend time with her, she didn't seem interested.  She found a another guy online to emotionally connect with and has recently had long phone conversations with online/ and phone. She's been more flirtatious with other men at the gym and other places.  That bothers me, but I felt it was theraputic for her to solialize and feel needed.  We recommended her (myself, her mom, family) trying out another mood stabilizer as this level of mania was clearly becoming unhealthy.
 
Three weeks ago, the doctor started her on Lithium with the Cylexa.  It went all down hill from there.  I have been percieved as the enemy from that point on (her mother to a lesser extent too).  Not because we recommended a mood stabilizer, but in general.  She has done nothing but pick a fight with me or attempt to.  She tells me I'm worthless, never loved her, never pay attention to her, and am pathetic.  She tells her friends and other people at the support group that I mentally abuse her and over-dramatizes to put me down (I overheard her conversations).  Her "boyfriend" stopped talking to her.  She confuses me with him and really lays into me even if I just ask to see how she is doing.  She wants to separate from me and me to move out and still pay the mortgage.  I wouldn't and she has "in-house" separated from me only to speak with me on stuff that concerns watching our daughter.
 
Obviously, quite a bit of this is related to the Lithium she is on.. but, unfortunately, more and more I attribute to the evolution of the bipolar.
 
In the time that she started to worsen after our daughter's birth, her younger sister was diagnose bipolar and worsened rapidly.  She's having similar issues with medicine.
 
When she argues with me,  my initial reaction was defensive.  I probably said a thing or two here that hurt her and I deeply regret.  After that, my approach has been supportive; I ignore the hurtful things she says.  I know its not my wife that I am really arguing with. Her eyes get glazed over and its almost as if she runs through the same script- trying to hurt me.  She's very incoherent during those times and sometimes doesn't make sense. This I feel is triggered by the stress of the day, and as I mentioned the medicine.  She's so much better in the morning and worsens through out the day.
 
All this year, I have really felt empty.  It's like a bad nightmare that I will wake up from and return six years prior.  I feel so angry inside that I have been here supportive, but not perfect, this past year and all she wants to do is get attention elsewhere and ask me to separate from her.  I feel so angry that when I try to explain how I feel, she turns it around on me and takes offense.
 
I have bipolar on myside of the family too.  I'm very certain my mother is undiagnosed, and my grandmother has had bouts of depression her intire life, including hospitalization.  I've expirienced issues with panic, and aggressiveness that I have felt get worse recently.  I thought that I might have been bipolar as well.  I sought the help of a pshychiatrist as well.  They diagnosed me with ADHD... that medication has worked fantastic.  Even though it has, I still felt that I wasn't right.  We tried Lamictal and I really thought that it did nothing for me, so I quit the medication last week.  I was wrong. it did work.  I felt the saddest and most helpless of my life.  I have since been back on it and felt stronger.  I read Lamicatal has anti-depressant properties, and  I believe that I'm not necissarily Bipolar, but depressed.  Reading the Internet, I see that depression takes a toll on men different than women.  I think the stress of the last year has caught up to me.
 
I decided to write because I feel so alone and scared that I need advice on how to hang in there.  The thing that has truly scared me was reading other threads on living with Bipolar spouses and the fact my wife's condition is definately worsening.  90% of marriages w/ Bipolar fail? 
 
Thanks for reading.

Post Edited (mth) : 11/5/2008 6:00:49 PM (GMT-7)


serafena
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2007
Total Posts : 3715
   Posted 11/5/2008 11:42 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi mth:

Welcome to HealingWell and to the Bipolar board.

I think you are right to be concerned and to get as informed as possible right now. Both of you need to be ACTIVE in fighting your ailments, whatever labels they may have and that means going to the doctor, seeing therapists or counselors, and taking care of your own needs. That means taking time for yourself when you need it, having long conversations about your relationship, and doing things that make you feel happy and healthy.

The statistic for bipolar marriages isn't good, but it also doesn't take into account the fact that a huge proportion of bipolar cases are untreated. Bipolar, left untreated, is truly a nightmare. You need to BOTH be on the SAME PAGE about facing your mood disorders together and committing yourselves to being healthy, whatever it takes. The lithium may be the problem for her, but she could be getting manic again, too. You need to learn some coping skills because she will get manic again and again throughout your lives. It doesn't go away.

Let me recommend a couple books:
"The Bipolar Disorder Survival Guide" by David Miklowitz has tons of info for both patients and their families.
"Loving Someone with Bipolar Disorder" by Julie Fast, et al. has plenty more info about the process and how to cope as well.

I hope that's helpful.

In the meantime, don't forget to keep yourself treated and your own health up. That will only worsen any difficulties you're having.

Be well,
serafena
Serafena
Co-Moderator, Bipolar Forum
Bipolar II


bpsoshare
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 12
   Posted 11/6/2008 5:49 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi Mth,
 
My story is very similar to yours. My wife is bipolar and was diagnosed five years ago. She had her first manic attack six years ago. I called the Dr  on advice from church pastoral care worker and my wife took it that I was trying to put her in hospital. From then on everytime she has relapsed (4 times) I have become the bad guy.
 
My wife is just coming down off the last manic attack and wants a divorce. I'm sad as she has a supportive family, me and three kids. She is throwing this away and has no immediate family to rely on.
 
I have alot of support from my local church. They have provided practical help looking after the children and being there to listen when needed. Both me and my wife get support this way.
 
I've not looked after myself during my wifes illness and now I'm emotionally strung out. After six years I've learnt the hard way that you need to look after yourself if you are to be able to carry the stress of being a bipolar spouse. Get support where ever you can. For info my wifes meds are lithium, sertraline and Zyprexa. Zyprexa is only used to bring things under control in a crisis, the other two are taking daily as a preventative.
 
 
 

serafena
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2007
Total Posts : 3715
   Posted 11/6/2008 10:45 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi bpsoshare,

Is your wife getting reliable care from a psychiatrist? She needs to see one again soon, because her meds are not currently pulling their weight and she needs an adjustment to bring the mania under control again.

Is she still living with you? Are you on talking terms? Will she listen to you if you encourage her to see a psychiatrist?

As far as your own stress and need for support... it's excellent that you've turned to the church for help. That is fantastic that they've been so welcoming and willing to extend a helping hand. BP can cause havoc on the whole family. I also can't stress enough the help that a professional counselor can do. Therapy is really useful in managing your own feelings and struggles and helping you learn to deal with your own stress. You absolutely have to take care of yourself FIRST in a situation like this, or you will be no good for your children or your wife.

Yes she is sick, but she also needs to make decisions for herself. The BP is influencing those decisions, and it's good of you to stand by her, but don't stand by and let yourself be abused either.

I wish you well,
serafena
Serafena
Co-Moderator, Bipolar Forum
Bipolar II


Diskus
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2008
Total Posts : 110
   Posted 11/6/2008 11:21 AM (GMT -6)   
Hello there-
 
My fiance is bipolar and I am not. We had to postpone our wedding and honeymoon this summer due to a depressive cycle which lead to a hospitalization.
 
Having said that...I should add that he and I are both committed to his treatment and attend therapy together (and his pdoc appts). His recent hospitalization did the trick and his med combo has been steady and stable for 4 months (lamictal, lithium, risperdal [for the paranoia that accompanies his mania] and klonopin for anxiety, when needed).
 
Even though he is stable, he still experiences moods and is sensitive to stress. I do believe that without total commitment and support from me, his family, our therapist, his doctor, my family, our experience would be less stable and more traumatic.
 
We did have traumatic times, I won't get into the gory details, but hearing about some of the things he believed was happening due to the mania made terrified for him, myself, and our future.
 
You do need to take care of yourself. I would have heart-gripping panic attacks driving home from work when I knew he was in the midst of an episode. I was no good to him like that. I got medicine for my own issues and have an individual therapist where I can vet my issues unrelated to our relationship and some that are (deep-rooted what-ifs that would only stress him out and would be unproductive for his treatment)
 
When he told me of the paranoia he was experiencing due to his past diagnosis of bipolar (he went off and on meds for approx 4 years), I gave him an ultimatum. We tackle this head on, or no me. I love him too much to see him suffer (and I love me too much to suffer with him) throughout his life when I knew there were options and resources available to enable him to live a healthier life.
 
We've had bad pdocs and trials of meds that made him worse, and hospitalizations...but, we're on a stable path now and who knows what the future will bring. I know what I'm getting into at this point and feel better equipped to handle a crisis should it occur.
 
There is hope for bipolar relationships. There is. A lot of the spouses come to the board during a crisis when there seems as though there's nowhere else to turn. I did.
 
I'm not telling my story (again) to flaunt it, I'm retelling it b/c I want other people with a bipolar spouse to hear it. It can be better. We're not wealthy, we're just two people madly in love, slugging along, trying to make it work. The meds are expensive, my fiance just got a new job w/ health insurance (thankfully), but for a while we had him on a patient assistance program to help him get the meds he needs. The pdoc gives us samples and he's partly on a scholarship at the therapist.
 
Things are coming together and we hope to marry this summer and have babies, who might have bipolar and you know the story...
 
I'd rather be with him, bipolar and all, than without him, any day of the week.
 
I'm sorry things are so tough right now, mth...there are other med combos for her to try, and her lithium might not be "in the window" and thus not successful in controlling her mania.
 
IF you could get her to submit to a blood test, that may be revealing, one way or the other.
 
Keep posting to let us know how things are going.
 
 

mth
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 11/6/2008 11:23 AM (GMT -6)   
Thanks for your comments- it's a little more comforting knowing that I am not alone. It always makes me wonder how people in similar situations coped before the days that bipolar and other mental illnesses were understood. Both the patient and loved ones. Or even how everyone coped before the wide support groups were available pre-Internet.

Right now, I think we are exploring a couple options with my wife. I talked to her doctor about the options. We couldn't obviously go into the specifics due to HIPPA, but talked in a hypothetical sense as I felt this is a safety issue for herself and my daughter.:

1) Stopping the Lithium. If we do that, what then? She's literally tried every single mood stabilizer out there except for Geodon and has had a similar reaction. If lamictal didn't work, that's worrysome. We can't let the mania get out of control as that could be equally un-safe.

2) Allowing the Lithium to have a chance to work. Other family members on her side having bipolar or depression say they have expirienced a situation where it has gotten worse before improvement on the meds. It has taken several weeks for the body to adjust to it. Lithium is suppose to be fast acting, but I suppose that the body needs a tolerance adjustment period. We can try to wait this out, as I don't care if I have to take the abuse or lay-low on the other side of the house, but as I said, I think when the day wears on my wife, it becomes a safety issue for her and my daughter. Not to mention, I'd hate to see my daughter have to bear more than she needs to.

3) Suggesting that my wife seek a stay at a longer term facility for a couple weeks to allow the medicines to stabilize in her system, or perhaps figure out a regimine that works for her. This will allow her to not have to deal with the usual stresses of the day and she can rest. The problem is that in our area, there is no good facility for this. Just a place that creeps me out and reminds me of the psch wards seen in the movies. I'd worry about her too much and wonder if she actually would get the correct attention she needs. My mother-in-law has been researching this option as well and where she lives there are better privately run facilities for this type of situation.

Either way, I think my mother in law is going to come stay with us to help get through this tough period, and figure out some more of what to do. I think there's a feeling among us of "what next" and a fear that my wife will require a much longer term care solution if she continues to worsen at this pace. I'm hopeful that some doctor somewhere can find a regimine that works for her through medicine and therapy (BTW, she has had a year of therapy last year, mainly to help out with the OCD aspect)

BPsoshare, can you tell me if you think the Sertraline and zyprexa are really working? I'm going to research some more medicines. Is the Zyprexa a relaxer like Kalonapin? This is another problem we're dealing with- shes taking way to much of the kalonapin, like 8-12 mg a day. It can't be helping the situation, and probably has caused an addictive behavior. We're trying to get her ramped down.

Post Edited (mth) : 11/6/2008 9:27:42 AM (GMT-7)


Diskus
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2008
Total Posts : 110
   Posted 11/6/2008 11:29 AM (GMT -6)   
Lithium and Lamictal together *can* do wonders...it's different for everyone, of course...

Again, if her Lithium isn't "optimal" it isn't working. She should have a blood test.

Precious Gem
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 1139
   Posted 11/6/2008 11:44 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi and let me say you are in the right place to vent and receive support. I suffer from BP, mostly mania and I know in the past before I got help, that I would get so mad at my husband and make all these plans to leave. Then after that feeling had passed I was so happy that I had someone that was not easily rattled and rode out the wave of mania. Now that I have my moods as stable as they can be right now, I am so thankful that I did not make any decisions that would have really left me alone and isolated. You do have to take care of yourself! And your spouse needs to make sure she is being compliant with her PDoc so that she can feel as well as she can. Sometimes BP people start taking meds, feel better and stop or the side effects are too harsh. This is a pretty long road to get things adjusted but it is not impossible. Besides meds there are other things she can do to make herself feel better, eat well consistantly, exercise or at least walk everyday and you have to take time to spend with your spouse away from the kids and work.

I can feel your frustration, I hope something will turn in a positive way for both of you soon. If you really love each other, just do not give up.

bpsoshare
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 12
   Posted 11/10/2008 6:48 AM (GMT -6)   

Hi Mth,

The meds are working but I don't think the mental health team really understand why. It's very much a try it and see approach. But for info I have noticed the following.

The Sertraline is a low dose of 50mg per day. I'm not sure if this really is of any use other than in the depths of depression but my wife finds it reassuring to be on it all the time. During a manic phase I suspect she should not be taking it.

The Lithium is taken at 1000mg per day. That's a high dose and has removed the small highs between each major relapse and noticeably its removed or greatly reduced the phsychotic symptoms this time round. The Lithium is the main mood stabiliser and is taken daily as a preventative.

The Olanzapine is only taken when approaching or during a manic / depressive phase. This works well when my wife agrees to take it. Now anyone reading this reply will likely know that's the biggest issue. As in all relapses my wife has refused to take additional medication till the last possible moment, manic highs can be nice to the one with BP. That said when Olanzapine is taken at a high dose (15mg - 20mg / day) my wife has come down off the manic phase after about a couple of weeks. The normal procedure then is to reduce the Olanzapine slowly down to 2.5mg then nothing. This takes several months to achieve. We found stopping the Olanzapine too soon caused a repeat of mania or depression.

The Olanzapine is an anti-phsychotic aswell as a tranquilizer so it reduces the anxiety and paranoid thoughts and at the same time has a sedative affect. Taken at night it helps my wife to get a good nights sleep which in itself helps reduces the mania. Taken at a high dose of 15 or 20mg it slows my wife right down. This is particulary beneficial in the throws of a manic high as it reduces the risk to herself and that of myself and children. I think the best thing for my wife during mania would be to take 15 - 20mg Olanzapine daily for atleast 2 weeks and not reduce until signs of mania had subsided. Unfortunately I suspect this will never happen as mania itself seems to provide such a good feeling that my wife actually enjoys it and loses insight into  the negative affect on family. In all cases so far Olanzapine has been started near the end of the manic phase and approaching the depressive phase that always follows.

The mental health provision where I live isn't all it could be. The medication is really the only treatment on offer. My wife sees a phsychiatrist once a year. The rest of the time she sees a CPN, community phsychiatric nurse (home meetings). The CPN's change frequently and some are definitely better than others. The CPN's aren't able to provide counselling either. I phone them each time my wife relapses and they ask my wife to take Olanzapine if they consider it necessary.

Good luck with your wifes med.

 

bpsoshare

 

 

 

 

 


mth
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 11/10/2008 12:45 PM (GMT -6)   
Just an update -

On Thursday, the wife realized, with our help, that her behavior was abnormal. She made an appointment w/ the doc and got in that day. The doc raised my wife to 900 mg of Lithium, and removed the Kalonapin, replacing it with something else (can't recall the name). She's having a blood test and may go up to 1200 mg.

This has made a huge difference so far, noticing improvment as soon as Friday, and even better on Saturday. The usual stress of the day still wears on her quite a bit, causing an aggravated state as the day goes on. It might be that's just the way the cards fall for now. I'm hoping as our daughter gets out of the twos and threes stage, it'll help reduce the stress during the long term - and I'll try as much as I can to help out with things. I'm still concerned from a safety standpoint a little bit, but feel a little bit of relief.

I'm also interested to see how things look in a couple weeks/months. It's tough to say how the body will react as it becomes use to the current dosage. The problem is that if the bipolar continues to worsen over time, there's not many more meds out there that she's hasn't tried yet.

serafena
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2007
Total Posts : 3715
   Posted 11/10/2008 2:33 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi mth,

I'm glad to hear your wife is feeling better. Just two things: the stress of the day always wears me out too, and by evening I'm usually very tired. I think this is probably kind of normal. I have a three-year-old daughter too and she's fantastic, obviously. But we have her in daycare even though I only work part time, because I can't handle full days with her. I am ashamed to admit this, but I would just be absolute jello by the time my husband came home if I tried to take care of her all day. I did it for the first year and a half and it was SO hard on me, and precipitated a very deep depression. So I don't know what your situation is, but if ├Żour wife is home with your child all day, you may consider this.

Also, don't worry about the meds, there are literally DOZENS out there. I'm certain that there are many others out there you can try if you need to. If you need proof, go to rxlist.com and search for bipolar drugs. That's why I'm so adamant that psych's see bipolars and not just gp's. They know about all the different meds and gp's just haven't studied them all.

I hope things continue to look up!

serafena
Serafena
Co-Moderator, Bipolar Forum
Bipolar II


keephope0527
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 11/23/2008 5:26 PM (GMT -6)   
Hello!  I am a new member and I too live with a bipolar spouse.  He has not been diagnosed as bipolar by a psychiatrist as of yet, but we are working on that.  When he was a teen he was sent to a facility for adolesence where he was diagnosed as manic depressive.  I did not know any of this before we were married, of course.  We are now on our 10 year anniversary of living together (married for 9) and we have 2 children.  Until recently, I have felt alone and confused about why he was behaving this way.  I never know which husband will walk through the door when he comes home from work.  We always refer to it as "The MOOD".  I really need some advise because I am not sure where he would need to go to get help and/or the medication that he may need.  I am exhausted and I need some assistance.  I am all cried out!!!!!

serafena
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2007
Total Posts : 3715
   Posted 11/23/2008 8:33 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi keephope0527,

Thanks for joining HealingWell and turning to the bipolar board. We're glad you're here and will try to help as much as possible.

Your husband needs to see a psychiatrist first. If he absolutely refuses to see a psych, he could see a regular general practitioner (gp) but that's usually not nearly as reliable or effective. Still, it's better than nothing. So if you can, get him to a doctor, and get the key is to get him to be honest about his mood swings.

There are literally dozens of medications for bipolar disorder, and a psych is going to be far more knowledgeable about them than a gp (one of the benefits). So it's impossible to say what kinds of medication he'll need. They generally fall into three categories though: Anti-depressants, Anti-psychotics, and mood stabilizers. Very generally, (and this isn't any sort of rule) bp patients take a mood stabilizer and then sometimes their doc gives them either an anti-depressant or anti-psychotic (for sleeplessness, anxiety and mania) as they see fit, given the symptoms. Many of us are on several medications at once.

In the meantime, clearly you need some help for your own sanity. Allow me to recommend a therapist for YOU. Being a spouse to a bipolar patient is not easy, and you absolutely do need support. There are also support groups which welcome spouses. Plus, of course, you are welcome here.

Thank you for coming and I hope that was helpful. Keep us up to date on how things are going.

serafena
Serafena
Co-Moderator, Bipolar Forum
Bipolar II


shebsy
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 125
   Posted 11/25/2008 4:23 AM (GMT -6)   
Dear mth,

Has your wife tried Carbamezapine? I take 600 mg of Tegretol every day and it has worked for me.

I used to take Riperdal and it stabilized me considerably but when I went off it, the withdrawal symptoms were terrible. I gave away my dog who I was terribly attached to and have regretted that move till date. I still miss my dog and I got another one but I don't care for her half as much. Patients react dramatically to change in medication, so it is best to stick to one even if it might not be perfect. I think your wife has been through too many different medicines. I tried changing my medicines too - got on Lithium for a couple of days. I wrote the worst thesis of my life - I had to redo it and got my tresses chopped. My psychiatrist finally put me back on Tegretol and told me to stick to it instead of changing medicines. I became really upset and tried changing my psychiatrist but incidentally the new psychiatrist I found happened to be a friend of my old psychiatrist and refused to change my medicine. Now I am not entirely happy with carbamezapine, but I have stabilized. Having a constant medicine and a psychiatrist has helped me focus on other aspects of my life like my career and my friendships, which I had neglected when I got busy trying to change everything.

Hope this helps.
Sheeba

keephope0527
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 12/3/2008 3:43 PM (GMT -6)   
Thank you Serefena!  My husband agreed to see a Dr and we went to see him together.  It was a great start.  My only concern is that it did not seem as in depth as I would have liked.  He was quick to give my husband a sample of Cymbalta to try for 2 weeks.  I have done some reading on it and it seems to be just an anti-depressant.  We did make sure to tell the doctor about the severity of his mood swings.  Can anyone give me some advise on this?

serafena
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2007
Total Posts : 3715
   Posted 12/3/2008 11:26 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi keephope0527,

For whatever reason, The doc must have thought your husband seemed more depressed than bipolar. You should start the cymbalta and see if it helps. If for any reason your husband gets worse than call the doc immediately.

Best of luck,

serafena
Serafena
Co-Moderator, Bipolar Forum
Bipolar II


keephope0527
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 12/7/2008 6:43 PM (GMT -6)   
Thank you for your info.  He has been taking the Cymbalta and seems to be doing ok, but too early to tell.  His mood swings are usually 2-3 days a week and happen consistently every week (although the days vary).  There are days where he comes home from work and he follows me around the house looking for something that I did wrong so that he can explode at me.  His frustration at things like standing water in the sink cause him to refer to the house as a pig pen.  Then he will continue through the night to find things that he is mad about.  If I withdraw and stay busy or in other rooms, he comes to me and pushes his mood on me more and more.  I wait until he goes to bed and then I cry for at least an hour off in a room by myself.  Then, the next day, he is the guy I meet 10 years ago - so sweet, loving and laid back.  Other days when he comes in and there are dishes not done, I profusely apologize and he laughs and tells me that it is not a big deal.  He is totally okay with water and dishes left in the sink.  How can the doctor think that he is just depressed?  This is every week of my life for the past 10 years.  I never know which guy is going to walk through the door.  And it is not just on the days that he is at work.  Any day of the week is fair game for this mood to appear.  I don't know what to think.
New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
Forum Information
Currently it is Wednesday, October 22, 2014 6:00 PM (GMT -6)
There are a total of 2,248,738 posts in 250,145 threads.
View Active Threads


Who's Online
This forum has 157417 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, Von Awesome.
418 Guest(s), 20 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details
Celeste15, logoslidat, Wrap_down_unde, CheleL, twingirl812, healthy2014, Savannah Rose, Luvzminis, Laceymyaalayah, Park12, opm, Redwing57, Dubaideb, Purgatory, Giftcreations123, InTheShop, paulroy, electracat, Mister Mike, Myself 09


Follow HealingWell.com on Facebook  Follow HealingWell.com on Twitter  Follow HealingWell.com on Pinterest  Follow HealingWell.com on YouTube
Advertisement
Advertisement

©1996-2014 HealingWell.com LLC  All rights reserved.

Advertise | Privacy Policy & Disclaimer