Daughter diagnosed, what to expect?

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Loving Mother
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2010
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 1/14/2010 12:52 PM (GMT -7)   
My 22-yr old daughter was diagnosed as having bipolar disorder 1 year and a half years ago. In September 2009, she questioned the diagnosis and decided to go off her medication. (I didn't agree or disagree, as I wasn't sure she actually had BD. We have lots of depression in the family, but no one with BD.)
 
Since September she's been through the wringer (and me, too). She began having delusions and is currently in a treatment facility. My question for you all is this: I thought that once they get her meds straightened out, that she would come home and she'd be stable for a long time. And she'd be able to go back to work, and resume her life. Is that too optimistic? Or is that a reasonable expectation?
 
It has been a horrible several months...for her especially...but for me as her mom. She's a beautiful, extremely smart and creative young woman, and my heart breaks to see her not feeling well. Any words of encouragement or information would be greatly appreciated.

serafena
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2007
Total Posts : 3715
   Posted 1/14/2010 6:49 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi Loving Mother,

Thank you for joining HealingWell.

She clearly needs to be on her meds -- most of us need to be on meds, but unfortunately that is no guarantee that we will be stable. The medications vary a lot in effectiveness, and it can take a while to find one which works with which there are no side effects. Finding the right medications is a process that requires patience. Once we have found good meds, we need to stay on the meds. You have to take them as prescribed -- without missing doses, around the same time every day, as recommended by a doctor -- or they are ineffective and can actually do more harm than good. Many bps stop taking their meds when they feel okay because they convince themselves that the diagnosis was wrong. Then they crash hard.

Your daughter may make a really dramatic recovery if they get the meds right. Or it may take some time, and she may feel so so for a while. Or she may keep swinging.

There's depression in my family also, with no other bipolar. Genetics is a contributing factor, but not the only cause of bipolar.

In the meantime, while you're waiting for her to put her life back together, encourage her to be as healthy as possible and stick with her meds (often side effects disappear within a week of trying a new drug). She's lucky she has you for support.

Because this board is primarily for people suffering with bp, you may find more focused support for yourself at one of the friends and family boards I've recommended in the "Bipolar Disorder Resources" thread.

Good luck,
serafena
Serafena
Co-Moderator, Bipolar and Depression Forums
Bipolar II

"Bipolar disorder can be a great teacher. It's a challenge, but it can set you up to be able to do almost anything else in your life." - CARRIE FISHER


Loving Mother
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2010
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 1/15/2010 4:37 AM (GMT -7)   
Thank you for responding, Serafena...very helpful. I'll try the resources that you've referred to...best wishes. :)

nasalady
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2009
Total Posts : 1176
   Posted 1/15/2010 12:52 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi Loving,

Serafena gave a wonderful response and great advice....I too am a mother of a daughter with bp, and can say that the outcome really depends on the person with bp.

I will give you a brief history of my daughter's illness. Please keep in mind this is just one person's journey; it does NOT mean your daughter will follow the same path!

My eldest daughter was diagnosed with bp in her teens; she is now 34, and over the years has had many different doctors, medications, hospitalizations, periods of stability, then long periods of no meds, wild mood swings and impulsive behavior, including self medication with illegal drugs and alcohol. The latter led ultimately to homelessness; I was unable to let her continue to live with me when she became violent and extremely disruptive.

Having the patience to find the right meds has been difficult for my daughter; she became frustrated with the process and at this time is not seeing a doctor nor taking any meds at all. She currently denies her diagnosis. I know that she enjoys her "manic" periods and doesn't like the fact that the prescribed medications take that "high" feeling away from her.

My daughter became pregnant and gave birth twice while she was homeless; twice she has had her babies taken away by Child Protective Services. Both of them have now been adopted by me and my husband because they terminated her parental rights....we wanted to keep them in our family.

She is currently married, living in an apartment with her husband. I continue to hope and pray that she will come to accept her diagnosis and seek medical help....if she does we will be able to allow her to see the kids when the doctor says she is stable enough! That will be so wonderful!

You and your daughter are in my thoughts and prayers.....
Take care,
JoAnn
Autoimmune hepatitis, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, lupus, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease, asthma, psoriasis, Raynaud's syndrome, hypertension, osteopenia, sleep apnea, restless leg syndrome, GERD.

Latest Dx: Lyme disease!! Lyme ELISA and Western Blot IgM/IgG Positive!

Prednisone, Imuran, Plaquenil, Lyrica, Cymbalta, Darvon, Levothyroxine, Atenolol, Cozaar, Mirapex, Zyrtec, Fosamax, Albuterol, Prilosec, CPAP


autoimmunediseasesgfliving.blogspot.com


bucci
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 1477
   Posted 1/15/2010 4:09 PM (GMT -7)   
Nasa!!!! wow, I was on this forum looking for what bipolar meds are working best these days and saw your post.
we have so much in common. I am 54 yr old too. but no children.
My question is are there some meds that are dangerous for lyme people? this is what I have been finding from looking
around on internet. Also I heard that lyme people should be working with Lyme savy psychiatrists.
I am wondering if how much of the bipolar is really a biproduct of the lyme?
of if any other bipolar people here have lyme?
any thoughts on this from anybody? I have been diagnosed bipolar for 30 yrs but i also have the lyme as long or longer.

thank you

bucci
hep c , lyme
Dad has lyme


nasalady
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2009
Total Posts : 1176
   Posted 1/15/2010 4:28 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi Bucci,

Sorry that you have to deal with the dx of bipolar on top of hep C and Lyme disease! I hope you find the right medications!

Take care,
JoAnn
Autoimmune hepatitis, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, lupus, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease, asthma, psoriasis, Raynaud's syndrome, hypertension, osteopenia, sleep apnea, restless leg syndrome, GERD.

Latest Dxs: Lyme disease!! Lyme ELISA and Western Blot IgM/IgG Positive!
also degenerative disc disease. :(

Prednisone, Imuran, Plaquenil, Lyrica, Cymbalta, Darvon, Levothyroxine, Atenolol, Cozaar, Mirapex, Zyrtec, Fosamax, Albuterol, Prilosec, CPAP


autoimmunediseasesgfliving.blogspot.com

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