My 12 year old daughter with bipolar-needs friends

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Cornholiio73
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Date Joined Sep 2016
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 11/3/2016 9:26 AM (GMT -6)   
Still new to this condition. She has been recently diagnosed, w started on lithium but had to stop due to side effects. So the doc has her on lamictal and celexa. It controls the depression or she simply cycled out of the depression but is now hypo manic...luckily we see the doc today.

How do you make friends when you have this condition? We are just realizing the disease may have been with her during her entire life, and has always had issues making friends and keeping them. She is a social outcast at school because kids think her wierd. Since her suicide attempt in September,she has been homeschooled. The few friends she had have since abandoned her. I'm so desperate to get her peer interaction I took up an ad on Craigslist...don't judge.
! We've done social skills groups in the past, not helpful. She hates sports and doesn't have the patience to learn a new one anyway. She loves anime, but those clubs meet once a month, which is how she met the friends she lost. We will be trying a new anime club on 11/10, but again once a month....how can I get her some positive peer interactions, my heart is breaking for her because she is lonely.

confused confused

Tim Tam
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Date Joined May 2016
Total Posts : 629
   Posted 11/3/2016 10:47 AM (GMT -6)   
Good to hear from you again.

Glad you're looking out after her.

I am similar to that.

1. I have manic-depression.

2. In some ways, socialization doesn't always come easy for me.

3. I like animals. My best buddy is my dog, who gets me out for exercise everyday, and then is my companion in the house day and night. It gives me someone to take care of and feel important, and who takes care of me by having a companion.

I talk pretty good, one on one, but at party, with say 3 or 4 people in a group, no.

My friends are probably like off-beat friends.

Does she enjoy a conversation? Does she like people when she gets together with them?

You brought up some really delicate subjects. Like, "How do you make friends when you have this condition?"

I had manic-depression when I was a teen, but I didn't know it. I did have a similar situation to your daughter, so I can relate to that in different ways.

When I was in the 11th grade, there was a stressful situation in the classroom. The teacher then said, "Let's read going around the room." It was like the death sentence because of the nervous state I was already in.

Well, it came my time to read. I was breathing so fast I couldn't catch my breath as it was, but to try to read out loud to the class was going to be a disaster. It went like this: "George Washington......... (breath)...... the........(breath)....president.......of the.........United States....." Finally I turned and asked the girl behind me to read for me and she did.

What I had was a psychotic episode, what it stimmed from I now realize was manic-depression there at 17.

I don't know if others knew about that because I never looked anybody in the eye when I went down the hall. I didn't know how my girlfriend who was sitting beside me when that happened was going to react, but I soon found out.

She wanted to drop me. Oh, heck. I clung on by keep asking her for dates, but she wanted to drop me. Double trauma.

What was I, damaged goods? Worthless? At 17 after that, I didn't know. I had a friend in the neighborhood, which helped. I had a couple of other friends from the high school.

You asked: "How do you make friends when you have this condition?"

Uh, I never really told anybody that I had that condition. Of course, I didn't know I had that condition, but she doesn't really have to discuss that if she wants to until she gets to know somebody.

You say, "We are just realizing the disease may have been with her during her entire life." Is she having it any better with her anger. Lithium has helped tamp down my anger.

You say, "She is a social outcast at school because kids think her wierd."

I have an idea of what that's like. You really bring delicate subjects so we're going to give you a medal for looking out after your daughter. You now I hung out with myself after school a lot.

Does she have interests. If she likes animals, can you get her an animal? Can you take her to an animal shelter to help look after some of the cats or dogs there?

Could she walk a dog at an animal shelter. Maybe she could see that there are some other beings who are having rough, and she would be in a better position to help them because she is having it rough herself.

Maybe she could volunteer at a hospital, maybe in the children's ward, to help kids with their homework, help them with a craft, talk to them, come back to see them the next day. Again, to see some other people who are having some problems, who she might be able to help because of her difficulties.

Does she have any hobbies at home? What are her interests?

"I'm so desperate to get her peer interaction I took up an ad on Craigslist...don't judge." Desperate and positive can work wonders. You are really to be commended for helping her out.

And I would encourage you to stay positive. When going into a problem, no matter what the problem is, thinking positive that you can solve it increases your chances. Are you positive?

You said, "how can I get her some positive peer interactions, my heart is breaking for her because she is lonely"

Mom.

Cornholiio73
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Date Joined Sep 2016
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 11/3/2016 11:23 AM (GMT -6)   
She enjoys conversation, but isn't really good at it. She says things that offend, blurting things out. Or she doesn't know how to engage in the normal give and take of conversation, she talks over people. That frustrates the. As far as being a social outcast, it's because she does act hyper, and immature. We thought this was "quirky" as her pediatrician advised, maybe a little hyper but since it didn't affect her learning, we were told not to worry, she'll grow out of it. She didnt.
She has always had issues making friends. We were told and assumed this was due to auditory processing disorder. It makes her misunderstand spoken words, and misunderstanding causes hurt feelings and arguments. This is why looking backward, I feel like this condition was with us the whole time, the only component missing was depression and that came on as soon as middle school started. She had no friends, got depressed, stressed and started cutting. Later came the suicidology.

Am I positive? No. Im sad. I'm sad for her. I feel scared of Her future. I'm sad that she is alone, and depressed. I feel helpless.
She isn't stable enough to volunteer yet. She loves cats, she has one but he isn't nice. Locally she must be 15 to volunteer.

I want her to be open about her condition to the right people, that's why I'm looking into support groups locally. I thought there may be local parents looking for the Same things. She could feel assured the other parents and children know about the condition and not react in ignorance. Perhaps find some acceptance, and not feel alone.

Post Edited (Cornholiio73) : 11/3/2016 11:29:35 AM (GMT-6)


Tim Tam
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Date Joined May 2016
Total Posts : 629
   Posted 11/3/2016 11:53 AM (GMT -6)   
You said:

"This is why looking backward, I feel like this condition was with us the whole time, the only component missing was depression and that came on as soon as middle school started. She had no friends, got depressed, stressed and started cutting. Later came the suicidology."

So the only things missing from the bi-polar, when she was younger, was the depression, which started at middle school. Did she have the mania before middle school?

You mentioned cutting and suicidology. You mentioned in your post a month ago intense anger. Where does this come from? How soon did that start?

Cornholiio73
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2016
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 11/3/2016 1:53 PM (GMT -6)   
I feel like the hyperactivity that we where seeing may have be mania instead. And that has been with her since 1st grade. She would get out of her seat and start doing jumping jacks in the middle of class because she just wanted to. Never could explain why she does things. As far as we know at this point, she had no depression until middle school, mid 6th grade, but she said she hid it from us. The cutting began shortly after that. suicidal thoughts maybe 9 months later, into this new school year -7th grade.
It's hard for me to tell, is this a kid with depression and hyperactivity or is this true bipolar. The doctor said that sometimes we don't know right away, and we try the medications to see if she is responsive to them. He said if she is hyper, it won't be fixed by a mood stabilizer. We literally just got back from the doctor. He said she needs to be at her current level of lamictal for another two weeks before he can increase it. He said in the mean time I can choose to give her half of her antidepressant for the next two weeks. Currently her depression is very intermittent and she feels it's pretty well underway control so I'm reluctant to do that. She slightly enjoys the "hyper" feelings even though they sometimes get her in trouble. I worry about allowing her remain in this state, since I have read it spirals out of control quickly.

I am also concerned if this is truly bipolar, the increase in energy could simply just Be her cycling into mania and not a direct affect of the antidepressant. I don't know. What I do know is my kid used to be mildly hyper. However she knew right from wrong and could easily be corrected with guidance. But since middle school, Even prior to her being in this medication, she has done some things she regrets. The beginning of middle school seems to exposed her to sexual ideas. In 6 th grade, late in the year when her depression began, she "sexted" a classmate. We just found out recently when she felt more comfortable "revealing her secrets" as she calls it. So we retrieved the messages she deleted, and they were explicit.both kids were of same age. Even though she was hyper in years past, I don't feel like these are things she would have done in 5th grade. So what changed? Why the sudden depression? Why the exaggerated hyperactivity and impulsivity? Is this just how bipolar works, one day you just kind of have it?

Post Edited (Cornholiio73) : 11/3/2016 1:56:23 PM (GMT-6)


Tim Tam
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2016
Total Posts : 629
   Posted 11/3/2016 5:29 PM (GMT -6)   
You said,

"The beginning of middle school seems to exposed her to sexual ideas. In 6 th grade, late in the year when her depression began, she "sexted" a classmate. We just found out recently when she felt more comfortable "revealing her secrets" as she calls it. So we retrieved the messages she deleted, and they were explicit.both kids were of same age. Even though she was hyper in years past, I don't feel like these are things she would have done in 5th grade. So what changed? Why the sudden depression? Why the exaggerated hyperactivity and impulsivity? Is this just how bipolar works, one day you just kind of have it?"
---------------------------

You say she communicated with a fellow classmate. I don't consider that trauma. She wouldn't be boiling over angry when she came out of the hospital a month ago over communicating with a fellow sixth grade.

We'll just have to leave that blank. But for her to be cutting herself, and boiling mad a month ago, what is she mad about. When did she start cutting? If any trauma occurred, it could have been when that started.

You know, that's a whole different ballgame. That's not simply manic-depression. So we can just leave it at "blank." Something occurred in her life. We don't even have to know what it is.

Did she start acting very differently at a certain age. Was anything going on prior to that? Again, we don't have to know what it is, something very bad happened. It doesn't matter what it was, in some ways. We just know it occurred, if she suddenly changed.

So, we know all we need to know.

This is a very difficult situation, as you know. I know it's difficult on her, and difficult on you. I know some people who have had trauma, and I just try to help them as best I can.

You said, "I feel like the hyperactivity that we where seeing may have be mania instead. And that has been with her since 1st grade. She would get out of her seat and start doing jumping jacks in the middle of class because she just wanted to."

I have a cousin who was hyper, and in grammar school, he said he would just start crawling across desks.

You said, "As far as we know at this point, she had no depression until middle school, mid 6th grade, but she said she hid it from us. The cutting began shortly after that. suicidal thoughts maybe 9 months later, into this new school year -7th grade.
It's hard for me to tell, is this a kid with depression and hyperactivity or is this true bipolar."

OK, mid 6th grade is when she started cutting. Something happened right before that, so at what, 11, something happened. And again, it doesn't matter what it was. Whatever it was, it was traumatic. And that's where the trouble started.

This woman I'm talking about that I try to help, had trauma. She has a psychiatrist she sees, we'll say, once a month. I try to help her out between visits. At one point she had a boyfriend who didn't care. I'm not her boyfriend, but I care. She needs the caring. "I just want to be loved," she said over the phone recently.

I'm thinking, "I can't help you." I mean, I can help her try to solve problems, but I can't do the 365 days a year live-in thing. That's what she wants, but there's a gap there.

If she has a problem, I try to help her with it, and it does seem to keep her going. I want to take care of a younger sister, and she needs a father figure. So we're a natural fit. I think you're just going to have to help her when you can, like you're doing.

As she gets older, she'll want to run loose, but then when she gets in trouble, she'll come running back. So if you can be the person who cares, who helps her try to solve problems when she gets in trouble, that will be a very important role. She needs someone who cares.

You said,

"The beginning of middle school seems to exposed her to sexual ideas. In 6 th grade, late in the year when her depression began, she "sexted" a classmate. We just found out recently when she felt more comfortable "revealing her secrets" as she calls it. So we retrieved the messages she deleted, and they were explicit.both kids were of same age. Even though she was hyper in years past, I don't feel like these are things she would have done in 5th grade. So what changed? Why the sudden depression? Why the exaggerated hyperactivity and impulsivity? Is this just how bipolar works, one day you just kind of have it?"

---------------------------

You said:

"So what changed? Why the sudden depression? Why the exaggerated hyperactivity and impulsivity? Is this just how bipolar works, one day you just kind of have it?"

Good question. My manic-depression just hit one day. I had a psychotic episode in 11th grade.

But I had a mental break down at 27 after 3 weeks of depression. So that's kinda when it hit. The 11th grade thing was a sign of it we'll say.

So you're right. It just hits.

The plot thickens.

You say she communicated with a fellow classmate. I don't consider that trauma. She wouldn't be boiling over angry when she came out of the hospital a month ago over communicating with a fellow sixth grade.

We'll just have to leave that blank. But for her to be cutting herself, and boiling mad a month ago, what is she mad about. When did she start cutting? If any trauma occurred, it could have been when that started.

You know, that's a whole different ballgame. That's not simply manic-depression. So we can just leave it at "blank." Something occurred in her life. We don't even have to know what it is.

Did she start acting very differently at a certain age. Was anything going on prior to that? Again, we don't have to know what it is, something very bad happened. It doesn't matter what it was, in some ways. We just know it occurred, if she suddenly changed.

So, we know all we need to know.

This is a very difficult situation, as you know. I know it's difficult on her, and difficult on you. I know some people who have had trauma, and I just try to help them as best I can.

You said, "I feel like the hyperactivity that we where seeing may have be mania instead. And that has been with her since 1st grade. She would get out of her seat and start doing jumping jacks in the middle of class because she just wanted to."

I have a cousin who was hyper, and in grammar school, he said he would just start crawling across desks.

You said, "As far as we know at this point, she had no depression until middle school, mid 6th grade, but she said she hid it from us. The cutting began shortly after that. suicidal thoughts maybe 9 months later, into this new school year -7th grade.
It's hard for me to tell, is this a kid with depression and hyperactivity or is this true bipolar."

OK, mid 6th grade is when she started cutting. Something happened right before that, so at what, 11, something happened. And again, it doesn't matter what it was. Whatever it was, it was traumatic. And that's where the trouble started.

This woman I'm talking about that I try to help, had trauma. She has a psychiatrist she sees, we'll say, once a month. I try to help her out between visits. At one point she had a boyfriend who didn't care. I'm not her boyfriend, but I care. She needs the caring. "I just want to be loved," she said over the phone recently.

I'm thinking, "I can't help you." I mean, I can help her try to solve problems, but I can't do the 365 days a year live-in thing. That's what she wants, but there's a gap there.

If she has a problem, I try to help her with it, and it does seem to keep her going. I want to take care of a younger sister, and she needs a father figure. So we're a natural fit. I think you're just going to have to help her when you can, like you're doing.

As she gets older, she'll want to run loose, but then when she gets in trouble, she'll come running back. So if you can be the person who cares, who helps her try to solve problems when she gets in trouble, that will be a very important role. She needs someone who cares.

You said:

"Even though she was hyper in years past, I don't feel like these are things she would have done in 5th grade. So what changed? Why the sudden depression? Why the exaggerated hyperactivity and impulsivity? Is this just how bipolar works, one day you just kind of have it?"

You asked, "So what changed?" That's what I want to know.

You asked, "Why the exaggerated hyperactivity and impulsivity? Is this just how bipolar works, one day you just kind of have it?"

That's the big question. Has she ever given you any clues?
(see signs of childhood bi-polar below and see if you can spot anything which may indicate this is childhood manic-depression developing.)

(One of the signs is:

"Long-lasting or intense outbursts or tantrums" (That's her!)

(Another sign is:

"An intense focus on sexual thoughts, feelings, or behaviors (hypersexuality); use of explicit sexual language"

That could be her.

The plot thickens.

You said,

"I am also concerned if this is truly bipolar, the increase in energy could simply just Be her cycling into mania and not a direct affect of the antidepressant. I don't know. What I do know is my kid used to be mildly hyper. However she knew right from wrong and could easily be corrected"

OK, I remember there is such a situation where a manic-person, such as myself, if given an anti-depressant, could go into mania.

So she's taking an anti-depressant, does she have anything to lower the mania?

You said, "It's hard for me to tell, is this a kid with depression and hyperactivity or is this true bipolar"

Bi-polar in children from WebMd.com:

• Abnormal happiness (euphoria).
• Extreme irritability or silliness.
• Long-lasting or intense outbursts or tantrums.
• Unrealistic feelings of self-importance. (These feelings are called delusions of grandeur.)

• Intense energy levels that last a long period of time.
• A decreased need for sleep.
• Increased talkativeness that is hard to interrupt.
• Racing thoughts and distractibility—attention constantly moving from one thing to the next.

• An intense focus on sexual thoughts, feelings, or behaviors (hypersexuality); use of explicit sexual language.
• An intense focus on reaching a goal or pursuing a hobby. For example, a child who likes to write poetry may stay up all night writing pages of poems.
• Dangerous or reckless behavior. For example, a young child may think he or she can fly and jump off a roof. A teen may drive too fast, spend money unwisely, or have unprotected sex.

• Extreme behavior that causes problems on the job, at school, in social situations, or at home.
• Symptoms of psychosis (detachment from reality). These may include hearing voices or being paranoid.


Cutting from WebMD.com says:

Very often, kids who self-harm have an eating disorder. "They may have a history of sexual, physical, or verbal abuse," Lader adds. "Many are sensitive, perfectionists, overachievers. The self-injury begins as a defense against what's going on in their family, in their lives. They have failed in one area of their lives, so this is a way to get control."

Self-injury can also be a symptom for psychiatric problems like borderline personality disorder, anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, she says.

Suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts

Certain problems increase the chances of suicidal thoughts in children and teens. Other problems may trigger a suicide attempt.

• Problems that increase the chances of suicidal thoughts include having:

o Depression or another mental health problem, such as bipolar disorder (manic-depressive illness) or schizophrenia.

o A parent with depression or substance abuse problems.

o Tried suicide before.

o A friend, peer, family member, or hero (such as a sports figure or musician) who recently attempted or committed suicide.

o A disruptive or abusive family life.

o A history of sexual abuse.

o A history of being bullied.

Post Edited (Tim Tam) : 11/3/2016 5:35:39 PM (GMT-6)


Cornholiio73
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2016
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 11/8/2016 4:06 PM (GMT -6)   
These are all very good points. What I meant about the sexting, and the timing of the cutting, is she regretted it.nshe felt ashamed and embarrassed of her actions. She couldn't believe that is something she would do, since "we taught her better", yet she can't really explain why she did it anyway. Other than to say, I wanted him to like me, I wanted to have friends. And it's odd, she will have second thoughts like about the sexting, even while doing it, but still continue with wrong behavior knowing it's wrong. She said the cutting relieved her guilt and anxiety about what I may say if found out what she did.nshe said she "punished" herself because she felt like a bad person, a ****.

Yes we take her to the therapist while she is in her "up mood", which can change on a dime,( literally 30 minutes, she could be depressed again.) her therapist says she is fidgety, leg shaking, says um, like and what a lot. She was previously diagnosed with auditory processing in third grade, but I was also told "possible adhd". Since it didn't affect her academically, but was just a mild nuisance teachers said don't worry about it. I also mentioned this at the time to her ped, who said the same.

So now, in therapy today, she said the most regrets she has and why she began cutting is because of her behavior. She got made fun of for "having fun in class and skipping down the hallways" and being "the loud kid who blurted out TMI" . The teasing made her feel badly, and hurt her self esteem. She said she punished herself by cutting for being " dork".

She says "why is it weird for me to be having fun at school". "Why can't I be myself". Today's session revolved around trust, who we let in, who we let really get to know us. Making her realize kids at school are acquaintances that really can't be trusted to know us deeply, and to keep some things to her self. This of course is to try to protect her from being bullied. Basically trying to teach her an appropriate audience and place to skip and run and have fun.

So the psych asked me if I wanted to just try some of the add meds, to see if it would help her be less impulsive. I'm beginning to think we should. Thoughts?

Post Edited (Cornholiio73) : 11/8/2016 3:11:23 PM (GMT-7)


Tim Tam
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2016
Total Posts : 629
   Posted 11/9/2016 11:22 AM (GMT -6)   
It’s good to hear from you.

Your latest post shows a distinct upbeat from your first one, which is great.

There is so much to this I can’t hardly keep up.

Reading back over some of your posts and whatnot, you’re saying you believe this change in attitude, some 6 months ago, was caused by puberty.

Coupled with manic-depression, plus possible Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. Plus extreme anger and cutting.

And all or most of this seemed to hit at one time.

You mentioned cutting in your above post. WebMD.com says about that:

“Very often, kids who self-harm have an eating disorder. "They may have a history of sexual, physical, or verbal abuse," Lader adds. "Many are sensitive, perfectionists, overachievers. The self-injury begins as a defense against what's going on in their family, in their lives. They have failed in one area of their lives, so this is a way to get control."

Self-injury can also be a symptom for psychiatric problems like borderline personality disorder, anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, she says.

(So with this last sentence above, for one thing, it all fits in with bi-polar, as you’ve been saying: cutting, depression, mania, intense anger, puberty.)

So that’s what’s going on with the cutting, it’s part of her manic-depression. So no matter what she says about why she cuts, it’s part of her bi-polar. It says above, “Many are sensitive, perfectionists, overachievers. …. They have failed in one area of their lives, so this is a way to get control.”

See, I’m just now realizing that. She’s bi-polar. You’ve been very calmly trying to explain, and I wasn’t getting it. It has so many tangents, some of which are connected with other things, but these symptoms are all connected with one thing: bi-polar.

You said above:

“So now, in therapy today, she said the most regrets she has and why she began cutting is because of her behavior. She got made fun of for "having fun in class and skipping down the hallways" and being "the loud kid who blurted out TMI" . The teasing made her feel badly, and hurt her self esteem. She said she punished herself by cutting for being " dork".

“She says "why is it weird for me to be having fun at school". "Why can't I be myself". Today's session revolved around trust, who we let in, who we let really get to know us. Making her realize kids at school are acquaintances that really can't be trusted to know us deeply, and to keep some things to her self. This of course is to try to protect her from being bullied. Basically trying to teach her an appropriate audience and place to skip and run and have fun.”

This reminds me of at least one thing I can remember that our now grown son said when he was growing up. My mother had a lot of emotional problems, and she was an absolute terror with children, but we didn’t fully realize that at the time and sometimes we felt we needed her for a baby sitter.

One day when he was about 3, he came to us after being with his grandmother, my mother, and said. “I don’t talk very good do I?”

Uh, oh. We knew my mother had been harassing him for not talking like a 20 year old.

That one sentence, in that one tone of voice, stuck in our hearts.

Here she was trying to destroy a 3 year old, as she had been destroyed with sexual abuse by her father. Really sad.

So when you say, “she said the most regrets she has and why she began cutting is because of her behavior. She got made fun of for "having fun in class and skipping down the hallways" and being "the loud kid who blurted out TMI" . The teasing made her feel badly, and hurt her self esteem. She said she punished herself by cutting for being " dork", it brings home that “I don’t talk good do I?” Not just the words, but what they’re describing and the tone of voice.

So, I have an understanding of what you’re going through. That would just tear me up.

I really have an admiration for people who are that sensitive. I like them more. Sensitivity is not a weakness, it’s a strength. You hate to see that sensitivity destroyed. You want them to retain it and keep it into adulthood. It’s a precious gift that needs to be protected.

But yet they have to learn real world, too. If she can retain it, she can use it to help others, and herself. I think she needs to figure out a way to protect that, not lose it, and keep it into adulthood. Maybe hide it when she’s around people in general, and let it come out only when she needs it, to help others, herself.

She needs to learn not to display it in general, every day. But to retain it for special times.

And she needs to know that it’s a good thing. You can remind her of that. That it’s a gift that she can use to help others and herself. If she writes, she can use it for poetry.

And a musician recently told me, “Songwriting is nothing but poetry put to music.” I never knew that. You might get her a guitar. If she could play that she could wile away many an hour. She might be a year or two away from that. You might look it up on the net: When do children start playing guitar?” or: “Learning Guitar” and see how young they recommend.

Guitar is nothing but 4 basic cords, 90 per cent of it. Maybe call a music store and ask to speak to a guitar teacher, and ask when they can start. There are other instruments, also. You can look that up on the net also: “Music lessons for children.”

She also said, “She says "why is it weird for me to be having fun at school". "Why can't I be myself”

She can be herself. She needs to know she’s wonderful for that, not horrible.

You said (11-3-2016), “Am I positive? No. Im sad. I'm sad for her. I feel scared of Her future. I'm sad that she is alone, and depressed. I feel helpless” You came from an abusive household. Can you re-read what helped me to be positive in my 11-3-2016 post?

I think you’re right again about wanting to get her in a group her age. Does the doctor or others know any groups for children who have problems?

You said, “So the psych asked me if I wanted to just try some of the add meds, to see if it would help her be less impulsive. I'm beginning to think we should. Thoughts?”

Yeah. Yours are the best.

theHTreturns...
Elite Member


Date Joined Mar 2009
Total Posts : 19087
   Posted 11/12/2016 10:57 PM (GMT -6)   
she needs a role model / peer. big brothers, big sisters type thing. not sure what you call them in your country. but we call them this. peers can be found in mental health clinics as well. maybe an older young person, but young enough to understand, with life experience may well be helpful. keep posting.
THE HAPPY TURTLE.

A QUOTE FROM THE HAPPY TURTLE THAT REFLECTS ME.

"COMPLEXITY IS MY WAY OF EXPRESSING MY NEEDS IN A MANNER THAT IS NEITHER DESTRUCTIVE, NOR NEGATIVE"
'
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