I think I'm bipolar

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
[ << Previous Thread | Next Thread >> ]

Nice_Guy
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 9/17/2006 7:49 AM (GMT -7)   
Ok, people. I'm 16 and I think I'm bipolar.

Family history? Absolutely - my mother's family is all (well, almost) on the meds, including her.

Since a kid, I though I was different. Well, I searched and searched, and found bipolar disorder - it was like a checklist of me, all the symptoms (sp?).

Anyways, what made me think of BP was my FAST mood swings. It's darn weird. In another forum (where someone told me to go here :-) ), I was told that mood cycles last days/weeks, but in my case the most common thing is hours, or just a few days.

Just to exemplify - yesterday, I was down. Right now I feel POWERFUL and insanely happy. Sometimes I want to cry just because I'm too happy to be true. It's amazing and I like to be likes this - I have a lot of energy.

Well, despite being extremely well right now, I know that I'll be down in a non-distant future. Well, that's what my rational part tells me, 'cause my emotional one is just jumping around.

Well, I've never been very *very* depressed to the point of killing myself, but this Up-down-up-down is really anoying (although the Up part is the funny part).

Telling about this to my parents is a No-no, and I don't my friends to know about this (although people may wonder why I'm the quiet guy one day or the extrovert the other ) tongue . I don't want to be on meds too. =/

Probably seeing a psychologist would be an answer, but I know none, and the schools' psychologist doesn't seem very competent.

I know, I'm ranting. And right now, I'm so up-beat that I'm thinking "Ah, who cares?! You're darn fine! Don't you feel great?!". But my rational part is telling "You have issues, man.".

Ok, insanity over for now. Do you think this is just wacky teenage years or there is a chance of me being bipolar? And what should I do?

Djonma
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2005
Total Posts : 285
   Posted 9/17/2006 9:12 AM (GMT -7)   
Why don't you want your parents to know?
If your mother is bipolar, the likelihood of you being bipolar is very high, so it might be something they're looking for anyway.
And... they'll certainly understand what you're going through!
Thoracic Outlet Syndrome from birth - Diagnosed 1999
Fibromyalgia from birth - Diagnosed 2005
(?) Ulcerative Colitis - waiting for tests
(?) BiPolar - currently on Diazepam whilst waiting for assessment.
Thrombocytacemia

No other medicines - doctors are useless!


CounterClockwise
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 1529
   Posted 9/17/2006 11:01 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi Nice_Guy,

Welcome to HW! There are lots of good folks here who have a great deal of experience of this illness and you should be able to find help from people who really know their onions and/or are going through the same as you.

I think Djonma's asked the key question here already -- and pointed out the key fact. Why, when you know this condition runs in your family (as it so often does) and when this should mean that you would have a great deal of understanding around you, do you not feel comfortable telling your parents? Given their own encounters with this illness, do you not think there's a chance that they suspect you might have it already?

One of the main problems with bipolar is that it most frequently turns up around the later teenage years, often just that little bit too early for the sufferer to get help without parents becoming involved. But that can be a good thing too -- you need support if this is what you have. In fact, given what you're saying about your mood swings, even if it *isn't* bipolar that you've got, you do need support.

A couple of things you need to bear in mind about bipolar are 1) that it doesn't go away: if you've got it, it needs treatment to be managed and not take over; and 2) treatment involves meds, and, even though that's only part of the treatment, it is an *essential* part of it: if you've got bipolar, you will have to take meds if you want to stand a chance of being in control of your illness rather than having it be in control of you -- so, and I realise this isn't really what you want to hear, but whether or not you want to go on meds is kind of academic.

What you need now is to be evaluated by a psychiatrist (psychologists only deal with the talk side: you need a psychiatrist because they are qualified to prescribe meds). The psychiatrist will make the diagnosis -- of bp or something else -- and will then work out a treatment plan for you. But, as I say, I think at your age you need to have your parents involved in this (legally). So it's a bit of a vicious circle, but it comes back to you discussing this with your parents. You never know, they might be relieved that you brought it up!

Keep us posted! -- We're rooting for you, but you do need to start with this step.

Rosie x
********************

People are not like fish: they do not work well battered.

When I'm not in my right mind, my left mind gets pretty crowded...

********************

 
Co-Moderator, Bipolar Forum


CapninHapnin
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 285
   Posted 9/17/2006 11:33 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi Guy

Welcome to our little club! I have symtoms similar to yours, although I don't cycle quite so rapidily. I go into hypomanias quite often, under no measurable time frame. Sometimes they last weeks, somtimes less than 12 hours. I have BP2 with rapid cycles. There is a very high incidence of BP within my family, even higher than we know of because so many were untreated.

You are way ahead of the curve so far, you realize something is amiss on your own, Very mature for someone your age. Unfortunately, I must recommend you speak with your parents. It may go badly, but it is worth the risk because the alternatives are so much worse. Not only a depression, but there is a strong possibility of life changing mistakes made when in a mania.

Good luck

Cap
I want "I wish I had one more day to spend at the office" on my tombstone.


Nice_Guy
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 9/17/2006 1:01 PM (GMT -7)   
"I think Djonma's asked the key question here already -- and pointed out the key fact. Why, when you know this condition runs in your family (as it so often does) and when this should mean that you would have a great deal of understanding around you, do you not feel comfortable telling your parents? Given their own encounters with this illness, do you not think there's a chance that they suspect you might have it already?"

Well... My mother has issues with having the ilness. She has refused to see a shrink some times, and she doesn't talks about it. She hates the fact some people may consider her a 'nut-case'. If I told her... ah, well, I guess it would be a big disapointment to see her son join the rest of the family. As for my father, he wouldn't even believe me. He would just brush it off with a 'Don't be silly' and leave it at that. Yeah, I'm afraid of their reaction too.

wmnak
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 1123
   Posted 9/17/2006 1:26 PM (GMT -7)   
i'm older than all of you, but i remember being a teenager very well (course i couldn't tell you what i had for supper last night).  PARENTS ARE THE ENEMY!  sometimes only in a teenager's mind and sometimes, as with our new friend, in reality.  when i was a teen, a friend of mine committed suicide.  he told me that he had told his parents over and over that he had problems, but that they had blown him off.  after the suicide, his parents were still in denial about their son's mental condition.  sad.
 
you may only be 16, but you are still responsible for your health.  i don't care what it takes, you must get evaluated.  yes, from the little you presented, you may have bp.  you may also only have a bad case of teenage raging hormones.  on this forum, we cannot diagnose.  that's the job of a pdoc (psychiatrist).  but you have to get from here to there.
 
legally, your parents are responsible for your health and cannot do anything to jeapordise that health.  after i became 16, i took myself to drs and had them send my parents the bill.  i'm not suggesting that you follow in my muddy footsteps.  i'm telling you that there are options open to you.
 
lots of luck.  keep us posted.  and we're rooting for you.
 
warren

lazy
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 241
   Posted 9/17/2006 6:43 PM (GMT -7)   
I wish I had the insight that you have when I was 16. But I do remember those years and I remember how afraid I was of my parents. I thought they were totally against me.  I even thought at one point that they were trying to poison me.  That was probably my bipolar rearing its head but it went unrecognized. I can't add to the wonderful replies that you have received, just know that you have a supportive group of friends. Please keep us posted.  Luv...Lazy

NiteScribe
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 27
   Posted 9/17/2006 7:58 PM (GMT -7)   
Hey...yes it's a horrible mood disorder and can cause some life changing mistakes like Cap suggests. But, I can remember praying the uplifting mood swings would last more than a few hours. I would just get so tired of trudging through one quiet depression after another -- with a smily face -- when I was your age. I will watch for you in our chat rooms, so do keep us posted, abreast of what's up.

PsychoChronie
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 40
   Posted 9/17/2006 9:16 PM (GMT -7)   
Guy, I do psychosocial rehabilitation therapy for children and adults who have mental disorders, including bipolar disorder. My 11 year old daughter is also diagnosed bipolar (rapid cycling) and she changes moods quite frequently. In fact, it is because of her diagnosis that I entered this field of work. Anyway, if you cannot start with your parents, or if you do and they poo-poo your concerns, then think about making an appointment with your primary care doc (from whom you will need a referral to a psychiatrist or psychologist anyway). You must take steps to share your concerns regarding yourself with a professional, if your family will not listen. We are all rooting for you. I will include you in my prayers.
Soichiro Honda, the founder of Honda Motor Company, once said, "Success is 99 percent failure."


CapninHapnin
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 285
   Posted 9/26/2006 7:29 PM (GMT -7)   
Hey Nice

How ya doin?

Just checking

Cap
I want "I wish I had one more day to spend at the office" on my tombstone.

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
Forum Information
Currently it is Wednesday, December 07, 2016 7:23 PM (GMT -7)
There are a total of 2,734,410 posts in 301,211 threads.
View Active Threads


Who's Online
This forum has 151329 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, OleMiss1990.
365 Guest(s), 8 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details
OleMiss1990, Rikky1, Ravineman430, Sarebear89, Wytrbt, Xmaslover, LiveJoy, k07


Follow HealingWell.com on Facebook  Follow HealingWell.com on Twitter  Follow HealingWell.com on Pinterest
Advertisement
Advertisement

©1996-2016 HealingWell.com LLC  All rights reserved.

Advertise | Privacy Policy & Disclaimer