I hate psychiatrists...

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IsThereHope?
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 11/22/2006 1:01 PM (GMT -7)   
I've been to a few but I have hated all of them...

Why do you all think they are so important? I really don't want to go to one. Why is my general practitioner not ok? You people are all making me second guess myself... I'm getting all paranoid and what not... My dr. hasn't said she wants to refer me to one, so doesn't that make her out to be confident/knowledgeable enough to write scripts for these drugs?

what could/would a psychiatrist do better?

Also, anyone know what could happen if someone takes one of these antipsychotic medications and doesn't need it? Just curious...


I've been taking the zypreza for 3 days and for the last 3 days I have been somewhat sleepy/dizzy and a couple other strange things have been happening.... should I keep taking it? my next dr appt is the first week in december.

thanks for any advice...

CounterClockwise
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 1529
   Posted 11/22/2006 2:08 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi IsThereHope,

The advice you're being given from people here is not because there's anything wrong with your gp *as a gp*, but diagnosis and treatment of bp is tricky and requires a real specialism and closer monitorinbg than a gp is able to give -- as well as therapy, which is also outside of a gp's remit.

Don't know offhand what taking an antipsychotic would do if you're not bp, but I wouldn't want to take any chances. Your gp's prescribing sounds a bit scatter-bomb to me -- and, however well intentioned she is, that's not what you need right now.

Do get yourself to a specialist. -- Your gp should have referred you at the first suspicion of bp.

Rosie x
********************

People are not like fish: they do not work well battered.

When I'm not in my right mind, my left mind gets pretty crowded...

********************

 
Moderator, Bipolar Forum


IsThereHope?
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 11/22/2006 3:10 PM (GMT -7)   
its tricky....

I've been on and off tons of stuff for nearly 20 years (I'm 27) with many different problems, mainly ADHD depression and bipolar....
remeron, luvox, effexor, wellbutrin, zoloft, xanax, celexa, concerta, depakote, dexedrine, lithium, ritalin and seroquel.............. quite a mouthful....
some have slightly worked maybe but I can't remember which ones and why and when and how.... etc. now....

If I knew there was a cool, young, awesome psychiatrist out there then I would totally go, those people I went to didn't seem like they knew anything so it doesnt make me so hopeful.... if I'm not feeling better in another month maybe I'll consult a psychiatrist....

LadyDragonfly
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 215
   Posted 11/22/2006 8:35 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi, I am new to this particular forum here. I will say I am a grad student working on a degree in mental health counseling and a medical transcriptionist. I have a good understanding of medications from my work and I am learning about some of it in school. I am NOT a doctor, but I can tell you what I know, or what I might have come across.

One of the criteria used to diagnose BPII is an "allergy" or at least untoward effects of typical antidrepressants, particularly SSRIs. In mental health care today, it is well known that about 70 to 80% of the antidepressant scripts written in this country are written by GPs. In my own experience, I was given Prozac 5 mg (25% of the normal starting dose) and given this on 3 separate occasions by my GP who didn't believe that it made me suicidal. I had similar problems on Zoloft, Effexor and Paxil. Wellbutrin left me completely out of touch with reality and amitriptyline made me dizzy, disoriented and gave me tunnel vision. My GP insisted on trying something new every month and going back over those that had failed. Why? Because she didn't have enough knowledge to diagnose BPII disorder.

I have seen a number of psychiatrists. I was on my 5th one when I received a diagnosis of BPII. If you can name a psychological disorder, I have been diagnosed with it! When the last one made his diagnosis, he carefully and deliberately told me that bipolar disorder is not a mental illness, it is a physical, medical illness, akin to diabetes. It is like diabetes in that is chronic and needs to be treated daily and monitored carefully.

As to why psychiatists think they are so superior...it is probably for the same reason that so many psychologists think they are so superior. They have studied this and feel that they can purge themselves of all such difficulties and be around to help poor, wacko, sicko, crazy you. It is the same thing that makes any medical specialist think they are superior because they are a doctor. They aren't superior, they are human beings and they all break wind and make mistakes like the rest of us.

I can tell you that when you enter grad school to be a counselor, there is NO testing of your mental processes, no MMPIs, no psych evals whatsoever. I have been observing that some of my fellow students are a little "screwy" and that is to say that they seem to have some psychological problems of their own. They aren't kicked out of the program, nothing is said, they just keep plugging along. Most schools these days do not require therapy for the student going through the program! It is a case of the blind leading the blind.

It has also been studied, whether or not someone with a mental illness can be an effective counselor. There seems to be some thought that being mentally ill to some degree can actually make a person a BETTER counselor. It has to do with the client being able to relate to the therapist and whether or not the client views the therapist as a person, or someone trying to act superior to them. You know, psychiatrists would do better with their patients if they got off their high horse and related to us.

With psychiatrists, as with all healthcare professionals, money talks. If you aren't getting what you feel is adequate service from one provider, find another. Research your meds online so you know what questions to ask your doctor about them and you know what you are taking and why. Be vigilant in getting the service(s) you need.
The Lady Dragonfly
Yes, it was me...I know because I was there when I did it. Only on occasional Indocin and Naprosyn. Lupus with significant balance difficulties and frequent falls (getting over a recent concussion). Vegan and loving it!


CounterClockwise
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 1529
   Posted 11/23/2006 1:41 AM (GMT -7)   
Fantastic input Lady Dragonfly! Welcome to HW and great to meet you! :)

Rosie x
********************

People are not like fish: they do not work well battered.

When I'm not in my right mind, my left mind gets pretty crowded...

********************

 
Moderator, Bipolar Forum


athmlldy411
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 91
   Posted Today 9:17 PM (GMT -7)   
ok here is what my gp told me..... he told me he had done all he knew to do for me and that i needed to see a therapist and a psychiatrist because they are specialist. he said it is like if i had a heart problem he would send me to a heart doctor because that is what they specialize in so think about it. psych. have the knowledge that a gp might not have.


God bless you all

Djonma
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2005
Total Posts : 285
   Posted 12/10/2006 3:19 AM (GMT -7)   
My GP told me quite plainly after I had been hospitalised for mania, that he just did not have the specialised knowledge that a psychiatrist has, and that he couldn't really prescribe for me because of that lack of knowledge.

As athmildy said, it's like being sent to a cardiologist when you have a heart problem. A GP has a basic knowledge in a lot of areas, but not a specialised knowledge in any area.
Prescribing for a condition like BP, as with a condition like ventricular failure, requires that specialist level knowledge.

I know it can be a bit horrifying having to go to see a psychiatrist. I've seen quite a few and I've hated them all up til now. But now that I've accepted things and I'm trying to sort things out, it's not so bad, and the pdoc I've got now is rather nice.

Unfortunately, as with all specialists, and indeed GPs, it can take a while to find one you like. Don't be afraid to ask for a different doctor though.
Best of luck!

Nicola
Thoracic Outlet Syndrome from birth - Diagnosed 1999
Fibromyalgia from birth - Diagnosed 2005
(?) Ulcerative Colitis - waiting for tests
(?) BiPolar
Thrombocytosis

Epilim Chrono 1000mg at night (Sodium Valproate)
Lofepramine (Feprapax or Gamanil) 140mg at night.
Quetiapine (Seroquel) when needed.

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