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postal2
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2003
Total Posts : 1106
   Posted 5/27/2010 12:25 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi ladies,
 
My daughter, 36, just had her first mamo since her history has several breast or ovarian cancers in there. The recommend her having genetic counseling and me being tested fro the brca tests. I know there are several on here who have had it, and I was wondering if your insurance covered any of it? Please share any info that you know, and I will be checking in regulary.  I would like to do this for her. I declined when my onc asked me 10 years ago when I was DX since then she said I would have to pay for it. Anyone know if this has changed?
 
Gail
  Be the kind of woman that when you feet hit the floor in the morning,
                     
                                    The DEVIL say's,
 
                                "Oh crap!  She's up!!


Lmmackey
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2005
Total Posts : 316
   Posted 5/27/2010 1:08 PM (GMT -7)   
I had the BRCA counseling and testing and my insurance paid, but I was 40 when dx and that made me "fit" into their category to pay. Probably not enough info for you, but I hope you can get your daughter tested.

Lauré
The finger of God touches your life when you make a friend.
----Mary Dawson Hughes---


postal2
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2003
Total Posts : 1106
   Posted 5/28/2010 10:19 AM (GMT -7)   
Laure, Thank you for the info, I appreciate it. I don't really get why they can't just test her, probably cause they would rather not be the ins company to pay for it. I have no problem getting tested, but I am not sure I will "fit" into the catagory. My family has had plenty of cancer, but not breast cancer other then me that I know of.

Gail
  Be the kind of woman that when you feet hit the floor in the morning,
                     
                                    The DEVIL say's,
 
                                "Oh crap!  She's up!!


Lmmackey
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2005
Total Posts : 316
   Posted 5/28/2010 11:43 AM (GMT -7)   
Gail...from http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/BRCA

How do people know if they should consider genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations?

Currently, there are no standard criteria for recommending or referring someone for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation testing.

In a family with a history of breast and/or ovarian cancer, it may be most informative to first test a family member who has breast or ovarian cancer. If that person is found to have a harmful BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, then other family members can be tested to see if they also have the mutation.

Regardless, women who have a relative with a harmful BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation and women who appear to be at increased risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer because of their family history should consider genetic counseling to learn more about their potential risks and about BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic tests.

The likelihood of a harmful mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 is increased with certain familial patterns of cancer. These patterns include the following (15):

* For women who are not of Ashke**** Jewish descent:
o two first-degree relatives (mother, daughter, or sister) diagnosed with breast cancer, one of whom was diagnosed at age 50 or younger;
o three or more first-degree or second-degree (grandmother or aunt) relatives diagnosed with breast cancer regardless of their age at diagnosis;
o a combination of first- and second-degree relatives diagnosed with breast cancer and ovarian cancer (one cancer type per person);
o a first-degree relative with cancer diagnosed in both breasts (bilateral breast cancer);
o a combination of two or more first- or second-degree relatives diagnosed with ovarian cancer regardless of age at diagnosis;
o a first- or second-degree relative diagnosed with both breast and ovarian cancer regardless of age at diagnosis; and
o breast cancer diagnosed in a male relative.


* For women of Ashke**** Jewish descent:
o any first-degree relative diagnosed with breast or ovarian cancer; and
o two second-degree relatives on the same side of the family diagnosed with breast or ovarian cancer.

These family history patterns apply to about 2 percent of adult women in the general population. Women who have none of these family history patterns have a low probability of having a harmful BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

You also may want to check out this place: http://www.dnadirect.com/web/article/testing-for-genetic-disorders/breast-and-ovarian-cancer-risk/18/insurance-coverage

Best of luck!!
Lauré
The finger of God touches your life when you make a friend.
----Mary Dawson Hughes---


barkyboys
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2003
Total Posts : 1564
   Posted 6/1/2010 5:26 PM (GMT -7)   
My insurance paid. I was 36 when diagnosed, with a family history of hormone-related cancers, but not breast cancer. I did have a paternal aunt who had ovarian cancer. My mom's cancer, I have never known point of origin for sure. In my family, I was considered the best candidate for testing because of my age at dx.

I think my oncologist had to sign a paper that said it would be medically beneficial to know my status. I chose not to be tested early on, as I didn't want a "positive" to be hanging over my daughters' chests as they grew, so to speak. But when my brother was dx'ed with prostate cancer at age 50, asked my girls if they would want to know, and they both said, "yes!" My elder said she would opt for a bilateral, prophylactic mastectomy and be done with it. My younger said she would still probably wait to see what happened. As it turned out, I was negative for 1 and 2. I still think there is a genetic component at play, so I was not greatly mollified by knowing I was negative.

Ironically, they were more concerned about the ovarian cancer and recommended a complete hysterectomy, which I still think about from time to time, but just haven't done yet.

Hope this helps.

BEV
"There's a difference between a philosophy and a bumper sticker."  --Charles Schulz


Tavish
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2003
Total Posts : 2272
   Posted 6/12/2010 10:54 AM (GMT -7)   
My insurance paid, but I was dx'ed at 30. I only did the smaller version of testing though, looking for the BRCA mutations that impact the Ashke**** population. We had no other family history so there was no reason to the full spectrum testing. Because I did the abbreviated one, the cost was just a few hundred dollars. I paid out of pocket and was willing to absorb that cost, but when I tested negative, I sent it in and they paid 100%. I might think if there is a doctor that makes a case that the testing is medically necessary then it should be covered. I would think, but of course I do not know for sure.

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