Going for second biopsy for microcalcifications.

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WTL
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2011
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 8/31/2011 12:37 PM (GMT -7)   
This is my first post and I'm confused that six months ago I had a core needle biopsy for microcalcifications and I understood the results to be benign. Just had my six month mamo check and the radiologist said more calcification showed up and they need to do another biopsy. I have since talked witht he surgeon who did the first biopsy and he said the results from the first biopsy show lobular neoplasia which is not cancer, but not benign. This is a whole new story for me. Needless to say I'm questioning where I am at and why another biopsy. Anyone else have this situation? WTL

Frayda
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2003
Total Posts : 248
   Posted 9/2/2011 7:21 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi!
Welcome to this site! This is a great place for information and support. Lobular neoplasia, or lobular carcinoma in-situ (LCIS) is not considered a cancer, but is a precursor or a marker for breast cancer. Someone diagnosed with LCIS is considered high risk for developing a "real" breast cancer. The are special protocols developed for following patients who are high risk, including regular screening with mammo, ultrasound and MRIs. Having another biopsy is a good idea, since the only way to know for sure what is there is with the biopsy. I hope this biopsy is benign, too. If this is benign, be sure to discuss his plan for follow-up! Good luck!
Frayda

WTL
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2011
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 9/2/2011 8:04 AM (GMT -7)   
Thank you Frayda for the informative, concise explanation of the condition. Having the procedure on Tues. 9/6. Hope this one is benign also. Wondering if every time the mamo shows changed calcifications I will need a biopsy. Seems like a scary cancer watch. I will keep posted as to what happened. I appreciate sites like this to read and share thoughts and concerns. It does help the process. Thanks again for the response. WTL

WTL
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2011
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 9/21/2011 3:39 PM (GMT -7)   
My second biopsy came back with basically the same, but stated as atypical lobular hyperplasia. Seems like they use all these terms interchangeably. Surgeon had me see the oncologist and basically he suggested Tamoxifen for five years. After discussing the side effects, one of which is blood clots, which run in my family, my dad died from pulmonary clot. we decided to do a watch with mamos and maybe MRI. Still not confident this is the right decision. I am postmenopause and had my ovaries removed after menopause which probably means not much estrogen going on. What I understand is the Tamoxifen stops estrogen from feeding the wild cells, but estrogen levels are already low why would this be necessary?

Would love to hear from others with this diag and hear what decisions they made.

barkyboys
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2003
Total Posts : 1564
   Posted 9/21/2011 9:32 PM (GMT -7)   
Not being in the medical profession, I can't really answer the "why" about Tamoxifen. I just know from studies I have read that it is more effective in post-menopausal women than pre-menopausal women, and it has often been used as the only treatment, besides surgery, for post-menopausal women.

I have a history of atypical hyperplasia of the cervix. All of my paps came back with this dx for several years, and then suddenly started coming back as normal. I felt like I was just waiting for the other shoe to drop for those years. So I know how you feel!

You could always think about prophylactic mastectomy and reconstruction. I know I'm considering a hysterectomy because of a family history of ovarian cancer. It's not 100% protection from cancer, but chances are much lower.

Glad that, for now, all is well, though.

Hugs...
BEV

Sue-B
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2012
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 1/7/2012 8:54 AM (GMT -7)   
Hello, I am also a new member and have recently had a needle biopsy on one breast and a surgical biopsy on the other (could not see area on second breast to also do needle) for several areas of microcalcifications on both breasts. Both biopsies came back negative, however I was told by my surgeon that I will now have to have mammograms every 6 months and see her because of the many areas of microcalcifations. My surgeon, although good, is very abrupt and brief, so I never feel I am getting an answer that is clear to me. When I askeed her exactly why and what they are looking for, her answer was"we are looking for everything". These biopsies were not easy as I had to be mamogrammed during each, on the surgical to place a wire marker, and on the needle I was biopsies during the procedures. My fear is they will also be repeating biopsies in 6 months, and all the doses of radiation, stress etc.

So glad I found this forum, as I am finding it difficult to get any information.

WTL
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2011
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 1/7/2012 10:08 AM (GMT -7)   
Welcome Feisty. Understand your confusion and anxiousness. Did your surgeon mention LCIS? After two needle biopsies six months apart I am now going to my six months check again. Have not changed anything so far, but thinking with this next check I will go somewhere else for mamo and reading thereby getting a second opinion. Depending on the outcome, hoping this will help clarify things for me and I can make further decisions. Will keep posting happenings and results.
Good luck and keep researching and sharing.
WTL

Sue-B
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2012
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 1/7/2012 10:15 AM (GMT -7)   
Thanks WTL..I asked her if she was looking for Lobular Neoplasia and they is when I got the answer "we are looking for everything". Going for my physical at the end of theis month and hopefully my primary can provide more info. Please keep me posted on your results.
Fiesty (don't like my handle, it was suggested by my husband after all other tries are already in use :-)

Sue-B
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2012
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 1/7/2012 3:09 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi again, was looking on the Brest Cancer.org site and found the explanation below regarding why Tamoxifen
"Medications such as tamoxifen or Evista (chemical name: raloxifene) have been shown to reduce breast cancer risk. LCIS is usually hormone receptor-positive, meaning that estrogen and/or progesterone fuels the growth of the abnormal cells. If you decide to use medication to manage your risk of breast cancer, you are likely to use tamoxifen or Evista.

If you are premenopausal, your doctor is likely to recommend that you take tamoxifen, a medication that blocks estrogen from attaching to the cells and signaling them to grow. Tamoxifen works to reduce the risk of an invasive breast cancer from developing in the future. A large clinical trial called The Breast Cancer Prevention Trial found that women with LCIS who took tamoxifen for 5 years reduced their risk of invasive breast cancer by 46%.

If you’ve already been through menopause, your doctor may suggest Evista (chemical name: raloxifene), another medication that blocks estrogen’s effects on breast tissue. A large clinical trial known as the Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (or STAR trial) showed that raloxifene was as effective as tamoxifen in reducing the risk of invasive cancer in postmenopausal women with LCIS.

WTL
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2011
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 1/7/2012 4:14 PM (GMT -7)   
Thanks. I will keep this in my file and discuss this during my next checkup.
WTL

Dora20
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2012
Total Posts : 1
   Posted 2/7/2012 3:45 AM (GMT -7)   
I had a surgical biopsy 5 days ago after core biopsy showed what they called DIN1a and focal DIN1b. I read up on these and they look like they mean atypical cells of some sort. I had been having mammos every 6 mos. for microcalcifictions for past 2 years, so always worrisome every 6 months. The last mammo, the radiologist said some of the calcifications looked like they started to layer which is a sign to check for cancer I presume. I don't see the dr/surgeon for results for another 2wks. Does anyone know of any kind of statistics for the likelihood of these being cancer as I don't really understand the new terminology of the DIN categories. Also if it is cancer is this usually catching it really early stage? I had a biopsy 3 years ago on other breast which came back benign, thank god. But as many others say on these posts, the waiting is so difficult. I am thinking positive and just hoping someone has info to possibly ease my worry. Thanks for all the information you provide on these posts!
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