Oncotype DX study back in - yippeeeee!

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Lmmackey
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2005
Total Posts : 316
   Posted 5/3/2005 4:52 AM (GMT -7)   
The results were completed Friday, but I couldn't get the pathologist or Genomic Health to release the results to me (the patient, hello) due to HIPPA regulations. I had to wait until 5:30 last night before my oncologist called me back. But ...

great news!!! Score was a 7 out of 100 which gives me only a 6% chance of a distant recurrence in the next 10 years. So, as long as the bilateral mastectomy has no surprises, no new tumors, etc., no chemo! I am so psyched, I was so dreading chemo. I was the support person for my husband for far too long on chemo, so I really didn't want to do that! I will be chemically inducing menopause and going on Arimidex (aromatase inhibitor) rather than Tamoxifen within a few weeks after surgery. Probably has it's own set of side effects, but I'll deal with them.

I hope today is a great day for all of you. We've finally got some sunshine here!

L&H,
Laure'
The finger of God touches your life when you make a friend.
----Mary Dawson Hughes---


gma
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2003
Total Posts : 2921
   Posted 5/3/2005 6:04 AM (GMT -7)   
Your test results sound wonderful!! Only a seven out of 100!!! Yippee for sure. The bilateral should really put you in good standing. I meant to react to your post about the outpatient surgery for a bilateral, but I think my phone rang or something and I had to get off line. Please do not fight the hospital stay. Bilateral or even single mastectomy is serious surgery. There are many veins and arteries involved as well as muscle and other tissue. These need to be watched for bleeding and you need to have your vital signs watched. I mention this in particular because when my daughter had her mastectomy a nurse changed her dressing and had her bend forward which broke open a bleeder. Luckily her surgeon came to see her shortly after that happened and realized she was going into shock. The surgeon stayed with her and held her hand while the OR was set up for them to go back and fix that bleeder. If she had been home and bent over?????? Well, who knows what might have happened. I think it is really wrong that they release people so soon after surgery. You have to keep running back and forth to the doctor's office to be checked and that is hard on you. Unless you have good, qualified nursing care at home, I hope you will stay as long as you can in the hospital. I know you have a "thing" about doing that, but believe me you need to take care of yourself and rest to heal, not run home where you know as well as I do that you will do more than you should. Hugs and prayers, MK


ardee
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2003
Total Posts : 854
   Posted 5/3/2005 9:33 AM (GMT -7)   
I'm so happy for you, Laure'! Yippee indeed!!! Way to go, girl. Prayers coming for a good surgical outcome and and easy recovery.

L&H,
Rita


possitive
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2005
Total Posts : 239
   Posted 5/3/2005 9:35 AM (GMT -7)   
I fully agree stay in the hospital as long as you can.I had a masectomy in march and they were going to send me home the same night and i said no way and im glad i did because i started having breathing problems and they were able to help me.the next day i felt better so you need those extra days in the hospital so they can monitor you for awhile. Love Tammy

MiaB
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2005
Total Posts : 205
   Posted 5/3/2005 11:53 AM (GMT -7)   

Laure' thats fantastic news!!  Congratulations!!  Lucky number 7 worked for you! 

I agree with the others that you will need all the time you are given at the hospital.  It's no time to show how tough you are.  Let them take care of you and you just concentrate on healing. 

Thanks Oncotype DX, you helped another one!!!

Hugs,


Mia
 
Snowflakes are one of nature's most fragile things, but just look what they can do when they stick together.


-Vesta M. Kelly


Lmmackey
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2005
Total Posts : 316
   Posted 5/3/2005 12:11 PM (GMT -7)   
Thanks for all the advice and well wishes, ladies. I definitely will continue with the plan for out-patient surgery. I spoke again with my surgeon about your concerns and they have never had one problem with my type of mastectomy and out-patient surgery. I am having a simple mastectomy without node disection (except for the sentinel node) and no muscle involvement. I've also done a tremendous amount of research about out-patient mastectomies and for women who are otherwise healthy, studies have actually proven recovery time to be approximately 11 days shorter for out-patient care vs. in-patient care. Believe it or not, there are more risks of infection while remaining in the hospital for every type of surgery. The ambulatory care center that I am attending has an entire set of surgical suites (7, my lucky number) and has an excellent record for outpatient surgeries. So, I appreciate your concerns and for helping me see I did make the right decision based on all of the research. Still, all the prayers you can muster would be greatly appreciated.

L&H,
Laure'
The finger of God touches your life when you make a friend.
----Mary Dawson Hughes---


janismarie
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2005
Total Posts : 44
   Posted 5/3/2005 1:11 PM (GMT -7)   

I am so happy for you.  I got the same good news.  I have completed surgery and sentinel node and met with oncologist yesterday.  Only rads and same type of drug you will be taking. I was dreading chemo..........but I am feeling like a weight has been lifted off my shoulders.  You and I are two lucky girls !!!!!!!!!!!!!!.

 

God Bless


Janis


Lmmackey
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2005
Total Posts : 316
   Posted 5/3/2005 2:51 PM (GMT -7)   
That, we are Janis. Very lucky indeed. Did you think you'd be saying this a few weeks ago? Funny how our priorities change! I'm thrilled for you as well. What was your lucky number? Good luck with the rads! I'll keep you in my prayers! Are they going to chemically induce menopause with you, too, and put you on Arimidex? I can't believe all of the newer treatments - another way we are lucky!

Take care,
L&H
Laure'
The finger of God touches your life when you make a friend.
----Mary Dawson Hughes---


Tavish
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2003
Total Posts : 2272
   Posted 5/3/2005 6:00 PM (GMT -7)   
Great news Laure'! I wish that this test was available for me back in the 'dark ages', but I am not sure I could have benefitted anyway (2.5 cm tumor)....but it is so exciting to see new tests and new procedures and new treatments! I love to see people benefitting from the research. And especially exciting is that your test results were favorable!

Way to go!
Lori

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