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QB
New Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 9
   Posted 5/18/2006 5:50 PM (GMT -7)   
nono  I don't believe age has not a darn thing to do with your chances of testing positive/negative for breast cancer.  My mother and her mother both had it and both were different types and they were drastically different in age when detected.  I do know if it weren't for my mother testing positive at 28 years old I would have never had the mamogram that produced the odd lump because i am still considered to be too young to require one.  Can someone please tell me now why is it that mamograms are for the most part age restricted?  If it weren't for my mother's case i would have never even known what i know about the cyst that i have.  Regardless of the fact that what i do know about it is still very little, but i guess i just wish that it didn't take a situation like mine to get the annual testing that pretty much all mature females should be receiving. 
Can someone please help me to understand why mamograms are with-held this way?
Taking it one day at a time....


debbiR
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2005
Total Posts : 730
   Posted 5/18/2006 10:09 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi QB and welcome! You asked a question that so many of us have asked for a long time as well as fought to get the system changed. I don't know who made the rule about the age a mammogram should first be done on a woman. It could have been the NHI or ACS or insurance companies. There are many insurance companies that will not pay for a mammogram on a young woman unless ordered by her physician. You are absolutely correct when you say that age does NOT matter. When I talk w/ an individual or speak before a group, I always stress the importance of SBE as well as a mammogram. Esp if there is a family history. The sooner one has a base mammo the better. My dd had to fight and eventually go to an ER to get a mammo. Even though there is a long history of bc in our family. Keep fighting for yourself and others!
 
Hugs..Deb
 


Lmmackey
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2005
Total Posts : 316
   Posted 5/19/2006 8:44 AM (GMT -7)   
I personally think that it is time that we (the royal we here???LOL) start to get serious about getting legislation passed that madates mammograms for women who are old enough for a pap smear. Too many young ladies have died and their families have suffered for lack of being taken seriously. I think this might have to be my next project!

I for one was lucky to have been followed closely because I had bloody discharge from my nipple, even though I didn't feel a lump. I also lived in a very urbanized area with some of the best medical care nearby. This is America and all women (and children and men) should have access to the best medical tests/treatment at the right time (ie: before an issue arises).

I just ran into a woman checker in my grocery store who was volunteering information that she couldn't go for a mammogram because she couldn't afford the price of the copay because she was paying so much in other medical bills at age 65. To me, this is not acceptable. Her feeling was that she had no BC history in her family, so it couldn't affect her. Even when I told her at 40 I was dx and NO ONE in my family had it, she still felt it was a genetic disease. Something must be done, and maybe that's what God has been showing me all along these last 16 months. Hmmm..

Thanks for letting me vent. Stay tuned for the next installment of "One-year survivor vents to online list".

Laure'
The finger of God touches your life when you make a friend.
----Mary Dawson Hughes---

Post Edited (Lmmackey) : 5/29/2006 6:13:07 AM (GMT-6)


Tavish
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2003
Total Posts : 2272
   Posted 5/19/2006 8:51 AM (GMT -7)   
I think the reason age matters for mammograms has to do with the effectiveness of the tool. I was 30 when diagnosied and my 2.5 cm tumor was not visible in the mammogram due to the density of breast tissue. For the most part, younger women just can't get any clear images, rendering mammograms less useful. I know they use it as a diagnostic tool when needed, but as a routine screening, it just does not pick up anything.

When I found my lump and went to the doctor, no one hesitated about giving me a diagnositc mammogram...

While cancer is much less likely to be diagnosed in a younger woman, we all know it can still be there.

Lori


QB
New Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 9
   Posted 5/21/2006 9:47 PM (GMT -7)   

   nono Lori, I don't wish to be argumentative, but i must restate the fact that the lump that has been detected in my left breast was only detected through a mammogram.  The Dr. herself never once detected anything abnormal with them durring the physical exam and there wasn't anything else other than my family history recommending me getting checked out and cleared.  Low and behold only the machine itself was able to tell this highly dense DDD size Breasted 24 year old that there was a lump in there slightly smaller than a dime.

Thank God for a Dr. who doesn't take any chances, risks, or, gambles.  And God help those whose Dr.'s still do.


Taking it one day at a time....


Nemekke
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 309
   Posted 5/21/2006 11:46 PM (GMT -7)   

I agree with Laure that more needs to be done so physicians are aware that Breast Cancer doesn't know any age boundaries.

I was 43 when I was diagnosed and I am 44 now so I fit in the category to get a mammogram, etc., but I have read of many younger women who have to fight for mammograms, ultrasound, etc.

Laure, I have two more chemos, then hopefully bilateral mastectomy, then I hope I will be strong enough to join your cause to affect changes in the laws.

In the meantime, QB, hang in there and keep posting and we'll do what we can to help.

 

H&L

 

Michelle


Lmmackey
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2005
Total Posts : 316
   Posted 5/29/2006 8:47 AM (GMT -7)   
Michelle,
I wish you the best of luck with the last 2 chemos. I did a bilateral mast. and because of the Oncotype DX genomic test, it was determined that chemo wouldn't do me much good. I'm on hormonal treatment and lupron to suppress my ovaries. Not a picnic, but certainly nothing like chemo. My DH had his 2nd bout with cancer 10 years ago at the ripe age of 35 and he had lots of the same chemos that bc patients have, plus some really aggressive ones. It was a very difficult time, but 10 years later we're thankful for all the meds available to help treat him.

I look forward to when you're stronger and we can gang up and fight this bogus ideology that some drs have about age and mastectomies. Hang in there and keep in touch!

Laure'
The finger of God touches your life when you make a friend.
----Mary Dawson Hughes---

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