Sarita, can you help me pls?

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Kiera
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2007
Total Posts : 364
   Posted 1/8/2008 4:58 AM (GMT -7)   
I've been dx'd with MS and have chronic pain. However, i do not wish to just sit at home, idly doing nothing. When my  mom became sick with Copd at age 58, i learned all i could about her condition. I knew when her  theopoline (sp) was toxic and to take my time pushing her wheelchair as it prevented the (out of breath feeling). I also knew that due to lack of oxygen she became sleepy alot and that the usual cause of death was right sided heart failure-result of the heart trying to help the lungs/becoming enlarged/eventually failing.
 
My dad soon became ill with RA, and he had a very severe form of it. Ended up convulsing and breaking his hip so I again was a caregiver. In between the two deaths I worked on behavior modification with an autistic child.
 
Im 46, but my life was spent in the military. Now i suddenly feel pulled toward medicine. I have a friend that her son was very sick. The general pract gave him benedryl and prednisone. He became sicker. An ER said strep but since he had a rash they wouldn't give him antibiotics (accused the mom of giving him penicillan). At any rate once I saw his hurting knees, i told my friend that i believed he had Rheumatic Fever (although it was very uncommon now). We rushed him to the hospital and sure enuff, it was.
That is one example of probably 15 more times that I was correct concerning neighbors and family. I find myself absorbing what I dont even try to learn. If its medical it just sticks in my head.  So I began to wonder if I should do something about  it.
 
A professor of surgery and of urology was giving me my urodynamics test and while i was taking in 750cc's (the detrusor never made an attempt), we had time to talk. When I told her about what ive been through. She said I should at my age become a nurse's practitioner. I had been approved 100% funding at age 33 but turned it down, thinking I was too old HA>
 
 
I've had several health care professional's take me aside and tell me that I need to go back to school and become a nurse or a nurse's pract. It's happened at least 5 times.
 
Now where I'm stupid at , is where to begin. My friend sent me some links to Morehead for online classes. What classes would I start with? I have no clue at all. I've never been inside of a college much less know any of there terminology.
 
I know I want to start classes as soon as possible which would probably be June, I just need to know what I should take in the beginning that would have me in the direction of Rn or General pract/ Do, etc.... Classes that would be for beginners to get me lined up with what I need.
 
Also is there somewhere that I can find a list of classes needed for different jobs such as Practinioners vs Nurses and so on? A list that would tell me the classes required for particular positons?
 
Thanks alot, Ive never taken an online class and am very excited to begin. I just would love to make certain that I dont waste any choices that can't be applied later.
 
For example if I wanted to be a Do, where would i find the criteria? A nurse pract, where would i find the classes needed? An RN, where  " " " "?
 
 
thanks again
kiera


Every day brings us closer to what we reach for .........in all things.
 
Kiera

Post Edited (Kiera) : 1/8/2008 5:02:15 AM (GMT-7)


Sarita
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2005
Total Posts : 2486
   Posted 1/8/2008 1:26 PM (GMT -7)   
Kiera, that's great that you're interested in pursuing your education and that you are interested in healthcare. The career choices are really vast.

I would not recommend going to medical school (to become an MD/DO). If you are 46 now, you would be at least 57 before you even finished your training (first you need a four-year undergraduate degree, then four years of medical school, then at least three of residency). It's a ridiculously long and arduous undertaking. I am in class 40 hours a week (if I go) but then study another 20-40 hours outside of class every week just to stay afloat. Not to mention that the average medical student is $100,000 in debt upon graduating from medical school, due to the skyrocketing cost of our education. Stack all that up and throw a little chronic illness on top and you're in for misery! Which is not to say you can't do it - but knowing what you'd be getting into is invaluable.

However, nursing is a really rewarding and admirable profession and there are many levels; you can get a two-year associate's degree, a four-year bachelor's, or go the NP route (I think that would take about six years). There are a lot of nurses on this board who can tell you how they went about it. My suggestion would be to go to that local college and ask to speak with an advisor from the nursing program to discuss what options they have. Just educate yourself as much as you can. Best of luck.
Co-moderator - IBS Forum


Kiera
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2007
Total Posts : 364
   Posted 1/8/2008 2:06 PM (GMT -7)   
Thank you,

I'd probably be going the 6 yr route. I think talking with the advisor is the best way to find out for sure, what I need to do. I dont plan on working in the field. I know that sounds a little odd, but im retired with full pension at an early age. I merely wish to learn so that I can help others for free. Of course I'm not suggesting i could do anything without a liscence. I'm just saying Im doing it also for the love of the information and passion i have for this field. Not for the money at all. You never know though. One day might find me needing it. Noone knows what the future holds except God.

Thanks for your wonderful fast reply!
Bless your heart for such a hard schedule, I wish you tons of love n friends made daily!

kiera
Every day brings us closer to what we reach for .........in all things.
 
Kiera


Sarita
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2005
Total Posts : 2486
   Posted 1/8/2008 11:00 PM (GMT -7)   
I always say you have to follow your passion, no matter how long it takes. The only problem is that when your passion becomes your job, it does change your perspective. I always wanted to help others, make them feel better. Now that I'm in the field, I realize what a task this truly is. I have had amazing moments already - doing physicals at the homeless shelter, volunteering at health fairs, shadowing doctors in clinic, etc. - but you acutely realize your limitations as a "healer" in those moments as well. It is humbling. One of my first patients was a man who came in with arm pain. His arm had been disfigured for years after he was hit by a drunk driver in a car accident. So you not only have to figure out why he has new pain, but you have to take into consideration all of those prior years of agony. What was it like when he first got hit? He was driving home to see his wife, just a normal day, and then this accident happened. He had endless surgeries. Then he was in rehabilitation care facilities. Then physical therapy. Then he had to explain to every single person on earth why he couldn't shake their hand. Why he didn't have a hand. Then you think: what can I do to help this man?

It's a lot to take in. It's a wonderful gift to have, to have people trust you. I will always respect my patients for that. For at least coming into see me, to seek help. It takes a lot of courage - for them, most of all.
Co-moderator - IBS Forum


Kiera
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2007
Total Posts : 364
   Posted 1/9/2008 4:34 AM (GMT -7)   
Sarita,

I think you'll be fantastic. I have a family doctor who still holds that humbleness you speak of and she's helped me more than any of my other doctors. Ruling out many things with bloodwork etc. Each new doc i've saw after her, comments of all the investigation she did. That she's done more than most of the neuro's. The entire time saying to me " i certainly cant help you", but " I can try to get you to who can"....Last visit I told her. You DID help me! You always listened, never minimized and you got me to where they were able to dx me. So you did help. She humbly smiled and looked very happy.

I prayed the other day for her, that she never loses that , in her profession. It's a very hard undertaking.
Unfortunately I know as a child it was "in the box" thinking, like you get sick, you tell mom, mom takes you to doctor, you get better. Simple cycle huh? Somewhere that seemed burned into my brain. Id guess due to the fact that we kids were healthy and the trips to the doctor were for ocassioanl antibiotics or tonsils to come out for one of us.

Going from that mindset to a chronic illness and the lack of concern alot of doctors today have WOW, what an awakening. I did realize fast that I had been thinking in the box for a long time. I've never minded a doctor telling me they didn't know, weren't sure etc. The ones who act like they know, know that your making it up--now those doctor's i have nothing for.

It's a line of work that can be highly rewarding but carries a heavy judgement on it as well. Your heart has the right intent, and sometimes (even with the man's arm), someone caring makes a world of difference. Did they ever figure out where the "new" pain was coming from? Had he reinjured it or was Rsd involved in neck and shoulders as well? I really don't know what to ask about him as I dont know if he's diabetic or what other parts of his history is significant.  Was anyone able to help?

I'm glad youll be in this profession. I'll pray that God watches over you and helps you to know what to do. He's the great physician, and i think if more leaned on him, we'd get closer to help.


kiera


Every day brings us closer to what we reach for .........in all things.
 
Kiera

Post Edited (Kiera) : 1/9/2008 4:37:32 AM (GMT-7)

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