PLEASE HELP ME...

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lonely2long
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 14
   Posted 4/6/2008 11:48 AM (GMT -7)   
I've posted here in the past, and wanted to reread what your responses were, but I'm not able to find my original posts, so I'll begin again.  I'm sure you will remember my original posts.
 
The subject I posted about was my husband and his history with opiates, specifically oxycontin, fentanyl patches, oxycodone and methadone. 
 
To refresh memories his history began 5 years ago when his doctor prescribed oxycontin for chronic pain.  He abused the oxycontin by crushing/snorting.  He then switched to fentanyl patches, which he froze and ate.  Long story short..he detoxed twice, was clean for approximately 1 year, then decided to go back on opiates.  He was then prescribed oxycodone 3-15 mg. tabs daily, and methadone 3-15 mg. tabs daily for chronic pain.  He does not take his medications as prescribed, but instead takes 6-15 mg. tabs of oxycodone and no methadone for the first two weeks of each month.  When the oxycodone is gone, he then takes the methadone to keep from getting drug sick.  He tells me he has half his script of methadone left at the end of each month, but when I ask to see it, he won't show it to me.  In the past, I know he has traded some of his methadone for oxycontin with someone he knows.  He tells me he has only done this several times.  I have no way of knowing if this is true or not.  He also sometimes crushes and snorts his oxycodone.  He sees nothing wrong with doing this.
 
He stays up all night, hardly EVER sleeps, eats sweets constantly, and every time I look at him, whether it's at night, or first thing in the morning, his eyes are slits and he falls asleep in the middle of his sentences, or while changing the channel on the t.v. set.  HE TELLS ME THIS IS WHAT PEOPLE ON PAIN MEDS DO WHEN THEY TAKE PAIN MEDS AND ARE TIRED.  I go down to check on him during the night, and can find him almost face down on the coffee table.  I watch him nodding.  If he lifts his arm, I'm able to watch his arm very slowly fall, as he falls asleep again.  I'd like to know if this is the way it is for all of you who take pain meds.  I know it's sometimes like this when the meds are first started, but he's been on the meds for years. 
 
Can you all please share with me what you act like when you take pain meds?
 
He tells me he can't work without the oxycodone, but the fact of the matter is that he works the last two weeks of each month without the oxycodone.
 
He had told me at one point that he would stop snorting, after I told him I would divorce him if he continued to do that.  He continued snorting.
 
I realize I am rambling, but he's starting to make me feel like I am crazy again, and that what he's doing with his meds is what everyone who takes pain meds does. 
 
He tells me he doesn't like to take the methadone for pain, so he doubles up on the oxycodone and has pain relief for the first two weeks of each month, and then uses the methadone only to keep from getting drug sick.  I think the reason his doctor gave him oxycodone and methadone is because my husband had told him he had a problem with opiates in the past.  His doctor told him that he will never increase the amount of oxycodone that he prescribes.
 
Please be so kind as to give me your opinions, once again, as to whether he is taking his pain meds for chronic pain, taking them to get high, or both.
 
Thank you all so much. 

CaryF
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2007
Total Posts : 505
   Posted 4/6/2008 11:54 AM (GMT -7)   
Dear lonely,

No wonder you are lonely! Your husband is an addict, abusing his medication. Get therapy immediately. If he wont' go - do it for yourself.

Best,
Cary

Gamma
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2008
Total Posts : 233
   Posted 4/6/2008 12:11 PM (GMT -7)   
Cary is right...your husband is an addict.  People in pain use not abuse their meds.  It is true that some meds can make you very sleepy, but he is just making excuses.  Don't let him drag you down with his addiction.  If he won't seek help for himself then you must find your own way out.  Don't  believe him when he says that this is the way it is for people on pain meds.  Some do abuse their meds, but the majority of us do not.  If you continue to enable him things will just get worse.  Most communities have organizations to help addicts and their families.  If nothing else you should join one yourself and maybe you will find the answers you need there.  Addicts only care about themselves and where their next fix is coming from.  It is only my opinion, but I think that the doctor that prescribed his new meds is being irresponsible if he know that your husband already has a drug problem.  There are other ways to relieve pain without abusing drugs.  I'm sorry if this sounds cruel, but that's what happens to drug abusers.  Please, please seek help for yourself it he won't find help for himself.

Gentle hugs,
 
Gamma
 
Fibro, Osteoporosis, OA, RA, DDD, IBS, Vertigo, Tinnitus, Carpel Tunnel, Epilepsy, Hypothyroidism, Familial Tremors, Spasms, Neuropathy
 
 


lonely2long
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 14
   Posted 4/6/2008 12:29 PM (GMT -7)   

Thank you both so much for your responses.

So you're both telling me that you don't nod out the way he does because you take pain meds, EVEN WHEN YOU ARE TIRED?  And, you don't stay up all night long, and people don't have to repeatedly wake you up when they're trying to have a conversation with you. 

He has been taking his meds this way for two years, and as far as I know, he hasn't increased the amount of oxycodone he takes.  Shouldn't he have a tolerance by now, and need to increase the amount he takes to get the same effect?  Of course he may be trading his methadone for other things.  I just don't know.  I cannot trust him at all, because he has NEVER taken his pain meds as prescribed, but he keeps telling me it's because methadone is so bad for you, and that I should be happy, because he still has half of his methadone script left at the end of each month.  This is suppossed to mean that he takes fewer pills each month by taking them the way he takes them as oppossed to the way the doctor has prescribed them to be taken. 

When I complain that he's not "emotionally present", he tells me this is because the pain meds block the pain to the brain, and also block his emotions?

Is there ANY way that what he's telling me about using all the oxycodone during the first two weeks of each month, and then using some of the methadone to keep from getting drug sick the second two weeks of the month could possibly be "just what works best for him and his pain" as he tells me?

Thank you all again.  I so need to hear what all of you have to say.  PLEEEEASE continue to answer my posts.  Please tell me what it's like when you take pain meds.  


crohnie1985
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2007
Total Posts : 140
   Posted 4/6/2008 1:01 PM (GMT -7)   
I have been taking narcotic pain meds for years now and I am no expert but, snorting/eating frozen pain meds sounds crazy. Even though that I have been in severe pain has the thought of doing such things is out of the question. Sorry your guy is having problems, best get help for him and yourself. Someone who is abusing drugs is not thinking right. I assume are not on drugs so do what you feel is best. good luck.

lonely2long
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 14
   Posted 4/6/2008 1:07 PM (GMT -7)   
Crohnie 1985,
 
He detoxed from oxycontin and fentanyl 2 1/2 years ago, so no longer takes either of those meds.  Do you feel there's any way that the way he now takes his oxycodone and methadone is as he tells me "just what works for him and his pain", and that the way he acts is "just the way everyone on pain meds acts when they are tired"? 
 
Do you stay up all night long, eating sweets, nodding out, smoking cigarettes because you are tired and you take pain meds?
 
Thank you.

sjkly
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2007
Total Posts : 2113
   Posted 4/6/2008 1:14 PM (GMT -7)   
I remember your original post. He is abusing his meds and if I remember correctly encouraging your son to do the same. Get help for your sake.
Sj

lonely2long
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 14
   Posted 4/6/2008 1:27 PM (GMT -7)   
sjkly,
 
Yes, you do remember my original posts.  Thank you.
 
Do you act the way he acts when you take pain meds...up all night, nodding, eyes half closed, falling asleep in the middle of conversations when you take your pain meds and are tired?
 

PAlady
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2007
Total Posts : 6795
   Posted 4/6/2008 1:29 PM (GMT -7)   
I remember your original posts, also. Were you by chance using another screen name? I think I recall it having the word 'trust' in it? I encourage you to search for that thread, as I posted some detailed responses. But you need to get help for yourself, to support you acknowledging your husband's addiction. Get help from some trained professionals in the addictions field. Call a local treatment program. I think I recall your husband had been in treatment before, so you may be able to call one of the program's he's been in, as they usually have family components. None of what your husband is doing is normal; it is dangerous and life-threatening, but you may not be able to help him. You first have to help yourself.

lonely2long
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 14
   Posted 4/6/2008 1:40 PM (GMT -7)   
PAlady,
 
Thank you.  Yes, you are right.  I have changed my screen name.
 
Could you tell me how to go about looking up my original posts please?

PAlady
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2007
Total Posts : 6795
   Posted 4/6/2008 1:52 PM (GMT -7)   
There is a "search site" box on the screen, although I've never used it. I usually just scroll back one page at a time, and then scroll down the page until I find the post I'm looking for. Takes a little longer, but in your case I think it's worth it. If you then make another new entry to that post, it will bring it up on the first page again.

sjkly
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2007
Total Posts : 2113
   Posted 4/6/2008 2:14 PM (GMT -7)   
lonely-
I am a little unusual. I have very odd responses to even pretty mild pain meds-codiene works for fourteen hours or more for me. But the whole time I am groggy, asleep or dizzy.
Most people taking pain meds as needed/prescribed would be functional on their meds though some would be prone to nodding off if they were not engaged in something-like might fall asleep in front of the TV. Cronic pain might keep you up at night but your husbands behavior is beyond that he is an addict, his drugs are organizeing and controlling his life and he is abusive to you and you son.
Sj

Skeeter_Bug
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2005
Total Posts : 86
   Posted 4/6/2008 2:40 PM (GMT -7)   
How does you husband manage to fool doctors? this really ticks me off when people can get pain meds just to abuse them while others who have chronic pain have trouble getting them it it was me I would turn him in to this doctor and let the doctor know what is going and if you don't you are not doing him any favors. he needs to dry out and get off the drugs.
 
I function normally while taking my morphine but I will not drive after taking it and the only thing I notice is I get sleepy and take a nap once a day esp if I did not sleep well the night before and also they way he injest them makes me convinced he is an addict and if he is selling it then do not be surprised if the POLICE RAID YOUR HOUSE AND HAUL YOU OFF TO JAIL ALSO. on a raid the cops arrest everyone and telling them you are innocent will not help confused
Baruch atah Aadonai
 
Hashem loves you whether you like it or not
 
 
Pray for the peace of Y'rushalayim
 
 
 
Fibromyalgia, Diabetes, Asthma, degenerative disc disease, facet disease, osteoarthritis, hypertension
BIPOLAR
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


PAlady
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Date Joined Nov 2007
Total Posts : 6795
   Posted 4/6/2008 2:57 PM (GMT -7)   
Your husband may have legitimate chronic pain, but it's a real challenge when someone is an addict, or has addictive tendencies, to treat chronic pain. Most of us know we will become dependent on certain medications; that's just how the body works. But if you take them as prescribed, you are not abusing. Many people have genetic predispositions to addiction, something that no one can control, and if exposed to enough addictive drugs - be they medicaiton, alcohol, etc. - they will begin abusing because their body may develop tolerance much faster for a variety of reasons.

There are protocols in addiction centers for treating chronic pain; usually a doctor with a specialty (called an addictionologist) is involved in managing the pain. Your husband probably won't be thrilled about this, to say the least. As I said to you earlier, and in the posts under your other screen name, YOU need to get support and help for yourself first. And from people who understand addiction. Then you won't be in this alone, and you will know more clearly what your choices are. You can't force your husband to change, and if you could influence him on your own it would have already happened. I know you will have to do some difficult things, make some difficult choices, but the fact you're back posting with the same problems as a few weeks ago tells me nothing is getting better. And in the case of addiction if it's not getting better, it's getting worse. Bottom line is addiction, if untreated, is a fatal disease. But there is treatment. Start with yourself first.

TDoern
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 495
   Posted 4/6/2008 3:37 PM (GMT -7)   
Lonely -

I remember your post from awhile back...

I'm afraid to tell you the responses are all going to be the same things as before. Your husband is addicted to the medication, and he is taking it for the high he gets from it, rather than the pain relief. If he was (at least in my opinion) in real constant pain and in need of the oxycodone - he would "need" each day - and not be able to just do without for the weeks he's only taking the methadone.

Chronic pain people are often looked down upon - and for the exact reason you are talking about. Your husband might have legitimate pain - but he's seriously abusing the priveledge of relief. Many CPer's end up dependent on their pain medication - at this point I consider myself dependent on them. After dealing with so much pain - and knowing that even the medication I'm on doesn't get me down below a 5 pain level - I have a fear of not having that medication there for me. I dream of having a day without pain - or even with a 3-4 pain level instead of the constant 6-7.

The big problem - at least as far as his real pain relief is concerned is that with him abusing the medications, and taking large dosages and such - it's going to take that much more to get his pain down when his pain gets bad. It's like stretching, normally you slowly stretch more and more as needed, it doesn't hurt, and nothing breaks, it is going to take a great deal of a stretch - very quickly and very far - to get something to get pulled or whatnot. If you don't stretch over time, and suddenly it gets stretched out of no where, your a great deal more likely to pull something. Your husband is getting his body used to the drug abuse - so when he needs the drugs to help the pain - they aren't going to be as effective.

My first thoughts - in all honesty - are to tell you to go to an appointment with your husband to see his doctor, I honestly don't see him allowing you in though, and if he does, I doubt he's going to allow you to discuss his problem. At the same time - if you make an appointment with that doctor - he cannot discuss your husband's problems with you, unless your husband has listed you in his file.

I totoally agree with PAlady - you need to get counseling, and get it ASAP. You have some very very serious decisions to make in the near future, and they are going to be difficult for you to deal with. Please, remember that his addiction is not your fault. You also need to know that he can't "quit for you", he has to quit for himself. Your husband has to realize that he has a problem, and then step up and decide that he wants to change. While he is going about his life, you need to start find a way to change yours. Talk to a counselor, pastor, priest, or call one of the many drug hotlines out there. They are as easy as a internet search, or a lookup in the phone book.

If things haven't changed over the past few weeks, they aren't going to without your husband coming to terms with the issues at hand. I commend you for caring enough to seek help, and as for your initial post awhile ago, wanting to see his side, and find out if all chronic pain people handle it that way.

If your husband won't change his life, hun, you have to change yours. You need to stop allowing him to hurt you how he is. Your husband is not going to be fun to be around if he ends up going into withdrawals and could very easily end up killing himself during it, and/or injuring you or your son.

I wish you the best, and applaud you for trying. My final, honest opinion though, is that you need to find a way out, safely, because I don't see things ending easily here. I feel that if you call him on his drug abuse, he's liable to harm you or your child, or himself. I don't see him admitting he's abusing things, and that he will take it out on you. Seek help, and look for strength, I've got a feeling you are going to need all of it you can find.

*hugs*
"When we come to the edge of the light we know, and are about to step off into the darkness of the unknown, of one thing we can be sure; either God will provide something solid to stand on... or we will be taught to fly.'"

"Cause when push comes to shove You taste what you're made of, You might bend, till you break Cause its all you can take; On your knees you look up Decide you've had enough, You get mad you get strong Wipe your hands shake it off, Then you Stand" From "Stand" by Rascal Flatts
_____________________________________________________________________________
Dx.: Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, Ulcerlative Colitis, Chronic Inflammation of the Colon, Ruptured & Fused L4-L5-S1 w/pinched nerves, Degenerative Disc Disease, Chronic Costochondritis, Back Muscle Spasms, Asthma, Benign Tremmors (hands)


lonely2long
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 14
   Posted 4/6/2008 3:45 PM (GMT -7)   

Thanks everyone.  Y'all will never know how much it helps to have the support of others when going through something like this.  I think I have things all settled in my mind, and believe that he is definately an addict, but then he starts in all over again trying to convince me that he is not an addict.  His main argument, and the one that gets me every time thinking I may be wrong about him, is his argument about......."my doctor will only write scripts for 3-15 mg. tabs of oxycodon and 3-15 mgs. of methadone a day (because he told the doctor he's had trouble with opiates in the past).  That's not enough to control my pain, so I double up and use all the oxycodone, and none of the methadone for the first two weeks of the month, and have good pain relief for the first two weeks of each month, and then use the methadone for the second two weeks of each month to keep from getting drug sick, and the methadone also gives a little pain relief, but not like the oxycodone.  In taking the meds this way, I am taking fewer pills each month, because I don't take any of the methadone during the first two weeks of each month with the oxycodone (as prescribed), and I still have half the script of methadone left at the end of each month". 

You are all telling me that what my husband is telling me above is a bunch of BS, and that he couldn't possibly be telling it as it truly is?  Coule you all please tell me why you believe he couldn't possibly be telling the truth above?  I need to be very sure of these things.

Thank you all so much for your support.


PAlady
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2007
Total Posts : 6795
   Posted 4/6/2008 4:01 PM (GMT -7)   
An addict is the last person to be able to define whether he/she is an addict while they're still "using'. And using can be with prescription, legal meds as much as anything else. Every addict will say at some point they "don't have a problem" and have it all under control and then will give you their rationale. And they'll keep giving it back to you as long as they think you might believe it.

As I said, you need to get help from people who understand addiction. And I have a strong hunch you need to have the questions about your husband's medication "use" answered to your face by a doctor. Although his doctor can't talk with you without his permission, you can supply information TO his doctor. But again, I think your best bet is to contact a local addiction treatment program and tell them you're a family member of someone you think is addicted. You can talk on the phone, but asking to meet with someone who can give you information as well as support is really what you need to do. I know you won't want to hear a lot of what you're going to hear, that's why the support - from people who know about addiction, because others who are well-meaning may actually steer you wrong - the support is crucial for you to be able to counteract your husband's inaccurate explanation. Ask yourself this - if it was all ok, why isn't that the way his doctor prescribed it? All these drugs are far too potent for us to mess with on our own. Even if your husband was a doctor himself, he shouldn't be writing his own scripts, and without professional, medical knowledge how could he make decisions on how t use these potent substances. If someone is hiding how they're using their meds from their doctor, that alone is reason to suspect something is wrong. Your husband's behavior has given you many other reasons. And as you mentioned in earlier posts, your son is part of this, too.

Please, please, call an addiction center in your area - and soon!

BigLucy
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 413
   Posted 4/6/2008 4:35 PM (GMT -7)   
Something doesn't make sense???? He uses his meds the 1st two weeks and then uses methadone the rest of the month to avoid getting dope sick, but, the excuse he uses to "double, triple up" is that the MD doesn't prescribe enough meds to touch pain management---but he manages the last half of the month without the oxycodone. Did I get that right? Excuses, excuses, excuses.

How does he manage work, is what I want to know? What exactly is his medical condition?

I have never stayed up all night eating sweets, watching T.V., etc.--sounds like what addicts do. I need approx. a good nine hours sleep a night to manage all the fatigue my chronic illnesses cause me.

I feel for you, b/c this is your husband were talking about. A friend of mine went through this with her husband some time ago, he was addicted to heroin. But b/c he had a very good high paying job, owned a home, had a wife, etc. he convinced himself he was managing it. The only thing that worked for them was she moved out, told him that she wasn't going to be there to watch him slowely die. It took approx. three months for him to get that his "perfect" world was crashing, but he eventually got himself into treatment, NA, etc. But he did it all on his own. He's been sober nine years now. Good luck, my thought are with you.

Gamma
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2008
Total Posts : 233
   Posted 4/6/2008 4:40 PM (GMT -7)   

He is simply lying to you.  Chronic pain is just that: Chronic Pain.  Taking all you pain meds at the beginning of the month does not create a residule effect, in other words, those meds are not going to do anything for his pain later in the month.  Pain meds have to be taken on a regular schedule for them to work properly.  I have been on pain meds for many yrs. and I can tell you that the doctor prescribes them at a certain dosage and certain times a day because that is what should work.  Look at it this way, your thirsty, so for 2 wks you drink all the water you can.  Is that going to keep you from being thirsty the rest of the month? No!

If what I read in one of the other posts is something you said earlier, about him influencing you son to take drugs then you both need to get out now.  Do you really want your son to end up like his father?  You are obviously very much in love with this man to have stayed by his side and tried to believe his excuses, but it is time to face facts.  Unlike many people you are at least reaching out for help and we are all trying to give you the help and support that we can, but we can't physically be there with you.  Find someone that you can go to.

Sometimes we have to help ourselves before we can help someone else.  You can'tdo anything for him until he is willing to admit that he has a problem and seeks help.  Please do something soon for your sake and for your son.


Gentle hugs,
 
Gamma
 
Fibro, Osteoporosis, OA, RA, DDD, IBS, Vertigo, Tinnitus, Carpel Tunnel, Epilepsy, Hypothyroidism, Familial Tremors, Spasms, Neuropathy
 
 


lonely2long
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 14
   Posted 4/6/2008 6:26 PM (GMT -7)   
 
Thank you everyone.  A little more in the way of explanation.....my husband works a full time job, on his feet for 8 hours at a time (against his doctor's advice) as  he has had 2 back surgeries, carries a diagnosis of spinal stenosis, herniated discs (neck and back), degenerative disc disease, and bone spurs in his neck and shoulder.  He also has osteoarthritis.
 
Our son also suffers with chronic pain, and is prescribed oxycontin.  He has abused this in the past.  I don't know what he is doing with his pain meds now, but I do know that my husband traded some of his methadone (during the second two weeks of a month) with our son for some of our son's oxycontin.  My husband told me he asked our son to do this, because he was having a very bad pain day. 
 
If my husband is an addict, how is it that the amount of the oxycodone he takes has never increased?  He is able to work a full time job, but when he is home he is up all night, and half asleep whenever I try to talk to him?  He dozes off and on through the night in front of the t.v., and goes to bed for an hour or two when I get up at 6 a.m.?  He tells me the only person he has any trouble with is me! 
 
 

sjkly
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2007
Total Posts : 2113
   Posted 4/6/2008 7:53 PM (GMT -7)   
Addiction is not defined by the amount of drug you take or even how often you take it but by how it effects your life. (Dependency is defined by how your body reacts to the absence of the drug-addiction and dependency are not exactly the same thing). There are alcoholics that only drink on weekends or only after 6:00 and who work a full time job. His willingness to ask his son to commit a felony speaks strongly of addiction. His allowing his drug use to affect his marriage speaks strongly of addiction. His speaking that way to you is abusive. Your posts indicate that maybe you are torn between knowing what he is doing is wrong and wanting to excuse his behavior as justified. He is in pain. He abuses his pain meds. He asked your son to commit a felony. He is not kind to you. I think you need to contact a counselor who specializes in spousal abuse and get out of that situation and take your son with you.
Sj

Disce Pati
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 61
   Posted 4/6/2008 9:04 PM (GMT -7)   
"You are all telling me that what my husband is telling me above is a bunch of BS, and that he couldn't possibly be telling it as it truly is? Could you all please tell me why you believe he couldn't possibly be telling the truth above? I need to be very sure of these things."


Hi Lonely,

I think that you have been given very good advice about seeking professional, drug counseling advice. I also think that you are dealing with an addict however reluctant I am to pre-judge anyone.....

that being said, I will try to answer some of your specific questions based on my own experience with methadone and oxycodone ( I take 10mg methadone a day and 30 mg oxycodone a day).

In my case, I rarely if ever, feel sleepy with my meds - even on those occasions when I have to double up for pain. But like a poster wrote previously, we all react differently. However, usually once a person becomes tolerant to the side-effects of meds like opioids, sleepiness, dizziness, itchiness, and even euhporia (not everyone gets this) is gone (about the only side effect that we don't get tolerant to is constipation). If I have a bad pain flare that lasts a few days and my meds don't help much, once it calms down I may be much more tired in that case and will spend more time in bed once I finely get relief....but I do not get that reaction from my normal dosage. Like my pain doc says, we prescribe at the level that keeps you participating in life - not lets you escape from life. If his dosage is so high that it knocks him out, than it needs adjusting / changing. My understanding is that if a dose is causing you to fall asleep then you are taking too much and you need to reduce it....this was a "rule of thumb" that my pain doc told me as a way to monitor day-to-day use......

As far as his claim that his using all his oxycodone the first part of the month and the methadone the last part of the month......I find that logic questionable. First of all I question this because he is going against his doctor's recommendation and this is a big red flag; anyone with long term pain control with narcotics realize that it is his or her responsibility to never go against the doctors advice. If the drug regimen is not working, you tell the doc and you work until you find one that does....you do not experiment to that degree (like your husband is doing) on your own. "Sneaking" like it seems he is doing is not he usual behavior of the usual pain patient. Secondly, based on my experience only, methadone and oxycodne taken together on the recommended schedule works much better than either of them taken alone. Methadone is a type of drug that needs to be taken regularly so it builds-up in the system - it is much, much more effective for pain control if taken on schedule EVERY DAY - it is not a very good immediate relief pain medicine like the oxycodone. Plus methadone can be very dangerous if taken in an attempt to control acute pain flares - taken like you would immediate release medicines. This is because it builds up in your tissues and is released back into your blood stream - so that it is much more easier to OD on methadone than other drugs in this scenario: you feel pain, you take more, pain is not addressed within an hour or so, so you take even more and finally you hit the OD level before you have any pain control. Not a responsible way to deal with pain. The other thing with Mehtadone is that people seldom get a "high" with it like they can with other narcotics......so the fact that he is using up his oxycodone during the first weeks of the month makes me think he is taking it for the "high" and then using the methadone for maintenance (or to prevent withdrawal symptoms) like you mentioned. And oxycodone (the immediate release kind) has lots of peaks and valleys during the day (it peaks in your blood about 2 hours after taking it and bottoms out at about 4 hours). So when taking oxycodone alone you have lots of pain variation during the day. But taking methadone and oxycodone together you get very good pain control for the most part: you get the long acting effect of the methadone - the evening out of the pain - and the ability to dampen down the ups and downs of the pain cycles that hit during a normal day. Together they can be very effective; taken separately like he is doing, probably makes the pain worse.....

Now there is no doubt that methadone may not work for all people who need pain control but if that is the case with your husband, then he should be telling his pain doc that and together they should be finding a drug combination that will work. The fact that he is not discussing this with his doc suggests to me that either he does not trust his doc or that he knows he is violating a responsible use of the meds. Everyone deserves adequate pain control for chronic pain - even prior or current addicts. But when prescribing for an addict, there needs to be a very special relationship and dosing schedule / oversight with / by a MD who specializes in addiction medicine. I fear that your husband is probably one of those unfortunate percent of pain patients who are addicted to their meds. He definitely needs help of an expert.

fieldgoal
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 13
   Posted 4/6/2008 9:18 PM (GMT -7)   
I am 31, have severe chronic pain and take fentanyl daily. I also have an intrathecal pump, which is programed by my doctor for 3 months at a time. I have no control over the dosage or when I can release the dilaudid. This is meant so the patient can't take too much. This makes the doctor and the FDA feel safe from abuse. All insurance covers this 2 day procedure. I take 100 times what your husband does and I have never snorted my meds, fallen asleep in my food, ect..  I am not trying to make myself look good. I am also not saying he is abusing his meds. There are going to be times when a patients may have a bad day and take more than is prescribed.Everying you wrote has told you that there is a severe problem. Does he go to a clinic? Does he ever have you go with him to the doctor. Insurance will come an intrathecal pump. If your husband really needs pain meds, ask him to get a pump. Tell him that you will give him his meds for a day at a time. So he can show you he is being responsible. You will no the thruth by how he reacts or if you go to the doctors and you tell the doctor how he is using the medication. I Have A STRONG FEELING THAT YOU ALREADY KNOW THE TRUTH. I hope everything works out and hopefuly everything works out for the both of you. P.S. make sure the doctor is a board certified pain management doctor. It is a 2 year fellowship after they become a full doctor. Also you can call the state to see if he has been investigated or suied by any patients. That doctor should know him the best!
 

PAlady
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2007
Total Posts : 6795
   Posted 4/6/2008 9:19 PM (GMT -7)   
Lonely,
I think you have been given a lot of excellent information here, but even you can see it all points in one direction. However, as someone suggested this is just a forum; it's not a substitute for in-person medical care. No one here can do that, and as I said earlier I don't think you're going to believe things until you hear it from a doctor who's knowledgeable in addictions, and who is standing in front of you (or maybe on the phone). Even then it's going to be difficult to accept, but you know nothing is improving; quite the opposite.

So please, get an evaluation of your situation by a qualified addictions counselor, and let him/her help you sort all this out. We can be here for support, but we can't replace treatment.

Please take care of yourself and your son!

crohnie1985
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2007
Total Posts : 140
   Posted 4/7/2008 2:27 AM (GMT -7)   
There has been so many postings on this thread and because most here have so much knowlege on the subject, it is quite clear what needs to be done. All of us care about you or we would not reply, that should convince you to do what needs to be done. I just happed to be reading the agreement I signed before starting Pain management recently, and it was very clear on the rules on drug dosage,sharing,selling, pill counts.random blood tests, etc. maybey you might leave a copy for your guy to read, then ask him to explain his actions.
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