Ankle scoping and debridement recovery

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tn850725
New Member


Date Joined Jun 2008
Total Posts : 1
   Posted 6/18/2008 3:38 PM (GMT -7)   
I had surgery on my ankle to remove scar tissue that was causing me pain playing soccer. It has been 11 weeks since the surgery and the pain is bad in the areas right around where he made the incisions. It feels a little stiff and hurts when I strike the ball. If anything, the pain is more widespread than before the operation. I can also feel the pain when I change direction and turn on my ankle sprinting. I was told I would be back in 6 weeks. My doctor said I need to be patient but I'm worried as it's not getting better. Am I being impatient or do I need to do something? I have done all the rehab the physios have set including strengthening.

PAlady
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2007
Total Posts : 6795
   Posted 6/18/2008 4:07 PM (GMT -7)   
Tn,
Welcome to the forum. I don't know much about ankle injuries, but soccer is a pretty demanding game on the body - especially on the ankle. Have you been cleared to play by all your docs and your PT? And cleared to play at full speed, which is what it sounds like you're doing. If you're getting more pain, I'd stop playing until I got it looked at again. It's been my experience that docs give a lot shorter predictions for rehab from surgery than what turns out to be true. Even eleven weeks isn't a long time, especially to be stressing it playing soccer.

I think you're probably being impatient, and you need to listen to your body. Many of us can attest to the fact that pushing yourself too fast too soon may result in an even slower recovery, setbacks, and perhaps additional injury. You may also end up needing to place some limits on your activity, but your docs need to give you that advice.

PaLady

TDoern
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 495
   Posted 6/18/2008 7:21 PM (GMT -7)   
TN - I agree with Palady - you need to listen to your body.

Please remember that surgery is very stressful on our body. Our bodies aren't made to have random things cut, sliced, and manhandled however the doctors feel like it. Every surgery has a load of risks and such that come along with it. The main thing that people tend to do after things like surgery - is push themselves too far too fast. Generally the rule is to slowly and easily work yourself back up. If it hurts - don't do it. Being uncomfortable and sore is okay - flat out pain is not. It's one thing my physical therapist kept having to pound into my head. Just because I "could" do it - if it hurts painfully - it doesn't mean I should do it.

I'm not sure what they did to your ankle or why - but no surgery is 100% effective. As I said there are risks that go along with it. BUT everyone out there's body isn't going to conform to the "six week" average either. Some are going to feel great after three, others are going to need 15 weeks. Are you seeing a phsyical therapist? If so what does he/she have to say? What about your doctor? What have they told you - what are they telling you to be patient about?

Please remember that pushing your ankle too far too fast could end up causing injury worse than the one you originally had the surgery for. Also - if you aren't careful you could cause your ankle to produce and over abudance of scar tissue which will also make things painful for you.

Talk to your doctors, and follow their instruction, and also listen to your body. If it hurts - as I said, it's not just uncomfortable, it's actual pain, don't do it.
"When we come to the edge of the light we know, and are about to step off into the darkness of the unknown, of one thing we can be sure; either God will provide something solid to stand on... or we will be taught to fly.'"

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Morgoth
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2008
Total Posts : 177
   Posted 6/18/2008 10:10 PM (GMT -7)   
Think you might have a problem there. Scar tissue is, usually, very sensitive at first but it becomes much more resilient after several years, thus providing extra protection. Now that you had some of it removed, you will probably have more problems playing soccer for years to come. Pretty sure you made a bad call there. Unfortunately I don't know any way to rectify the problem; should I come accross something, I'll let you know.
To stand and be still at the Birkenhead Drill is a mighty bullet to shew.


solar powered
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2007
Total Posts : 532
   Posted 6/19/2008 8:18 AM (GMT -7)   
TN, you may have adhesions at the incision lines. Massage can help but you really need to talk to someone about this and try to be a little patient. Lisa
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