withdrawel from oxycontin

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Lynsy
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2008
Total Posts : 1
   Posted 9/15/2008 2:20 PM (GMT -7)   
I was using oxy 40 mg about 15 times per day for a couple of years. I have gone through detox, and have been clean for 18 days now. My problem is I cannot sleep, I still am having alot of anxiety and I am just so jumpy and irritable. I have joined a support group of intensive out patient therapy ,we meet 3 days per week for 3
 hours, but I still feel like i am going through hell!!! I never want to use again! I never want to put my body through this anymore. I also feel soooo tired!!!! I am also walking and taking vitamins and eating well. Does anyone out there know how long this will last? smhair

PAlady
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2007
Total Posts : 6795
   Posted 9/15/2008 4:19 PM (GMT -7)   
Lynsy,
It sounds like you're dealing with addiction and not chronic pain, is that correct? This is a forum for chronic pain patients.

I do commend you for dealing with what appears to have been a serious addiction (that's a lot of oxycontin to be taking for anyone!). Discuss the withdrawl symptoms with the leader of your IOP (intensive outpatient program). They likely have an Addictionologist who they can refer you to to help with sleep and other effects. That's a doctor with a specialty in addiction medicine, who is what you need to manage your addiction, withdrawl, and any chronic pain you might have.

Good luck!

PaLady

Pamela Neckpain
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2008
Total Posts : 1821
   Posted 9/15/2008 6:24 PM (GMT -7)   
PaL,
You were polite. I don't think I could have been. But I do commend you.
Pamela
MEDICAL CONDITIONS

Osteoarthritis all levels of spine right down to Coccyx,Spondilytis,Myofascial Pain
Fromyalgia,Bulging Discs,Spinal Stenosis,Scoliosis,Osteopenia,Chronic Constipation
Carpel Tunel Syndrome,.Prolapsed Bowel and Bladder, Attention Deficity Disorder,
Depression & Anxiety

Methadone for Pain, Xanax for Anxiety,


Hello~Kitty
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2005
Total Posts : 610
   Posted 9/17/2008 11:25 AM (GMT -7)   
I feel so aweful for people who start taking pain meds for chronic pain and it leads to addiction, it seems to happen way too much, almost everyone I've met that started taking anything for chronic pain is now abusing it ( I even have a family mamber who took it the right way for 15 years and then her pain got worse so she started abusing them), but from what i've heard sleep is the last thing to come back after detoxing, usually can take months, but i've personally have never been thru it. I really hope you get better, and good luck.
DX: Lower Back pain, Migraines, Pancreas divisium
RX: Imitrex, Topamax, Suboxone


PAlady
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2007
Total Posts : 6795
   Posted 9/17/2008 12:33 PM (GMT -7)   
Dear HelloKitty,
Most people who take opiates and other medications for chronic pain or other conditions do NOT become addicts. We do, however, become physically dependent on these medications and that's the nature of how they work in the body. What can happen is that we may develop a physical tolerance, and so the dosage may need to be adjusted over time. A good pain management specialist should understand this, but it's not to be confused with addiction. After 15 years it is possible that a pain condition may worsen and more medication may be needed. This is something to discuss with your doctor, rather than to simply start taking more medication on your own. For many reasons - ignorance being one of them - even doctors may not be willing to prescribe so that pain is not undertreated, and undertreated pain may lead to abuse. I'm not condoning that; it just means the CPP needs to do what most of us have to at one point or another - search for a doctor who can and does treat the pain adequately.

Remember for most of us as we age our pain condition is likely to slowly worsen (of course that depends on the specific problem), and that in itself may require adjustments in medication and have nothing to do with dependence or tolerance. But add all those factors together and those of us on long term management for pain should expect we'll need to make changes over time.

PaLady

Hello~Kitty
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2005
Total Posts : 610
   Posted 9/17/2008 2:23 PM (GMT -7)   
Hello, thanks for the info, but I come from a family thats has some doctor's also, one of them that treats people with certain types of chronic pain, so I guess maybe thats why we also have a few addicts in the family cause I guess when your related you get a hold of meds easier(I dont know if that's true, thats just my guess since it seems to easy for them to get their hands on it). I wont see them as a patient, I like to keep family and bussiness apart. My 2nd cousin (I guess thats what she is, my cousin's cousin) is a family doctor and absoutly refuses to see people with chronic pain, she sees them as low lifes I guess. She told me that when her patients are in severe apin she admits them to the hospital to control their pain til it's gone, but she wont prescribe more then a hand ful of hydros at a time and she also gave me a big lecture on how suboxone is the devil's candy, but I think she's full of it lol. So I get advice thats completly diffrent from each other.

-hellokitty
DX: Lower Back pain, Migraines, Pancreas divisium
RX: Imitrex, Topamax, Suboxone


PAlady
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2007
Total Posts : 6795
   Posted 9/17/2008 2:31 PM (GMT -7)   
Kitty,
Remember that genetics play a strong role in who becomes addicted, so if you see a lot of tendency to truly become addicted (that takes a professional assessment to know the difference between addiction and dependence) genetics is one likely culprit. If you read a lot of these threads, you'll see a lot of PCP's won't treat chronic pain, although some do. There are a lot of reasons why, and some legitimate as doctors get increased scrutiny when they start writing scripts for opiates.

Sounds like your cousin probably has had a few bad experiences with pain patients (or addicts masquerading as pain patients), but unfortunately that ends up tainting the truth about chronic pain patients, which is when pain is adequately treated people rarely become addicts unless they were already addicts before, and/or have some genetic predispositions they're not aware of. In those cases a chronic pain patient needs to work with an Addictionologist, who is a doctor with a specialty in Addiction Medicine, to have their pain treated.

PaLady
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