Talking or Complaining

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fatherjohn
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Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 999
   Posted 2/21/2009 11:30 PM (GMT -7)   
By now some of you might have noticed that I try to keep positive as much as possible. I have seen the reports that show that when people with CP get frustrated and angry, the pain increases. Since I am still working 40+ hours a week and speak to groups constantly about drug/alcohol addiction, I struggle with the difference between talking about the pain and complaining. Even with my wife and children, I try very hard not to be a complainer but when you are on the upper end of the pain scale on a regular basis, it is almost impossible to not complain at times. How do some of you face this battle if indeed you do?

PAlady
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2007
Total Posts : 6795
   Posted 2/22/2009 12:11 AM (GMT -7)   
Fatherjohn,
I, for one, come here. Since I live alone, there's no one in the house to complain to! And the little bit of work I do is similar to yours - not somewhere I can talk about my problems.

I have one cousin who knows most all the gory details, and sometimes I know I have to catch myself because I think I overburden her at times, and forget she has her struggles and strains.

I think there's a real difference between venting and doing some "healthy" complaining, and dwelling forever at the bottom of the pit. I think that's why I love the fun threads here, and find them extremely important to my escape, but I know in a heartbeat (you've already seen examples) I can turn around and cry or scream about something painful or frustrating, and have many ears listening.

I have come to appreciate the benefits of not just connecting on the internet, but this forum (Healing Well) in particular. I've posted to a couple of others, but have never lasted. Having it be moderated I do believe helps, as it keeps the spammers out, keeps it family friendly, and somehow just attracts a great mix of people. I'd encourage you not to hesitate to complain or vent at times here whenever needed. In the next breath you can go over and "fly" and no one bats an eyelash.

Don't know if this is what you were looking for, but thought I'd toss my 2cents in (as usual!).

BTW you're a great new addition to the forum.

PaLady

fatherjohn
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 999
   Posted 2/22/2009 12:20 AM (GMT -7)   
Thank you for the response. I am not referring to what is on this forum as much as day to day contact. I have people ask me all the time how I am doing. They don't understand CP and if every time I see them, if I am honest, it could seem like complaining. For instance, I can not remember the last full nights sleep. I ask my wife on a regular basis if she thinks I am compalining as I share how I feel. I appreciate this forum because I sense it is CPers talking to and with other CPers. But out in the everyday interactions, how does this difference get recognized. I agree with you the virtual trip is a distraction for me to keep my mind off my pain and even the side effects of the meds.

PAlady
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2007
Total Posts : 6795
   Posted 2/22/2009 12:28 AM (GMT -7)   
In all honesty, I think the difference doesn't get recognized in most everyday interactions. I think you'll see that periodically in posts here. I think it takes a very special person (possibly a spouse, but not always, as you well know) who's willing to listen and learn.

If someone says they have cancer, there either people who are going to do anything they can to help and understand, or those who will back away in fear. But chronic illness that contains persistent pain or discomfort....I do think most people tire of hearing of it. I'm having difficulty articulating this because I'm still tryiing to get clarity in my own mind about this issue. I've worked with a lot of people with chronic illness, as well as MH/SA, but seeing CP from the inside out is teaching me an entirely new level of understanding. But I can't put it into words yet.

I think I'm going to start rambling if I go on any further, but maybe this will be flushed out more as others post.

PaLady

skeye
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 2976
   Posted 2/22/2009 9:05 AM (GMT -7)   
I too try to limit my complaining. I actually hate talking to most people about my pain because I 1) don't want to burden or bore them, 2) don't want to be defined by it (although, unfortunately, I often feel like I am), and 3) the vast majority of people cannot and do not understand & often their responses only make me feel worse.

Most of the time, I try to give the illusion that I'm handling things well, because I don't want people to know what I'm really going through, and pity me -- in fact one of my roommates just told me a couple of days ago how well I seem to be coping (I'm really not), and how if she were in my situation, she wouldn't be able to handle it nearly as well. Instead, I internalize everything, which I know, is not good. Really, the only people that I will talk to, or complain to about my eye are my parents, but even then I try not to. They understand and can sympathize/support me better than anyone else. But in the end, they cannot know what I am going through without having experienced my pain, and that leads to frustration on both our parts, and often ends in me getting annoyed and hurt. My father is the one that I seek out to talk with the most, because he understands the best out of anyone - partly because he is a dr and understands pain from a medical perspective, as well as the process of treatment, etc. He can usually comfort me, but then again, the exact opposite can happen to. I got into a huge argument with him just the other day, and right now, I'm not sure that I can talk to him about this again, at least not for a while.

CP is a very lonely ailment, even if you are surrounded by family & friends. That is why I love coming here. I complain & vent here way more than I do outside here. I mainly just keep to myself. It helps me to write things down when I am upset and need to vent. Back in the fall, I purchased a journal that I use just to write about my pain. I don't write in it every day, but it really helps me to get things off my chest when I've had a really bad day. While it cannot give you any support, it can at least silently listen.

Skeye

Chartreux
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 9622
   Posted 2/22/2009 10:01 AM (GMT -7)   
wow Skeye a journal sounds like a good outlet for you, I hope you can keep it up.
Fatherjohn, wow you asked a very hard question and looking back at me, I guess
I do complain a lot around my husband and daughter the most, as none of the
rest of my family would or could understand (plus they live over 2,000 miles away)
When people ask how I am, I usually just say "Okay" as they don't really care because,
they are going throuhg their own struggles..
So to me the question "How are you?" should just not be used at all, except maybe if asked
by certain doctor's.
Now back to the main point, it's hard not complaining and I think only a very very few people
can says they don't complain and one of those would've been Mother Theresa, and I
ain't no saint...
Thanks for making us think and reflect Fatherjohn!
Soft Hugz to all......
**********************************************
* Asthma, Allergies, Osteoarthritis, Spinal Stenosis, Degenative Disc, Fibromyalgia, Gerd, Enlarged Pituitary Gland
******** "We could never learn to be brave and patient if there were only joy in the world" from Helen Keller *********

********>^..^<********>^..^<********>^..^<********


Scarred_for_life
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2008
Total Posts : 1559
   Posted 2/22/2009 11:21 AM (GMT -7)   
Skeye; I too purchased a personal journal here not long ago for that very same reason. It helps to be able to write my thoughts and how I feel on something that I can look back on later and remember how I handled that situation or feeling. That way I can deal with things a little more easier. I'm not a real big church-goer, in fact it has been years since I stepped inside a church, but lately I have found myself praying. Not only for a resolution to my pain but also for other things like my family (who by the way are well and fighting) and my husband and his family. I haven't prayed in 10 years and I don't know why I started looking to God for some help but, I think it has helped and I feel at ease a bit more. My family with the exception of my husband and his family, do not understand my pain nor do they want to. I've been told that I need to suck it up.....exercise.....get the hell off my medications and other very rude things and I think I have gotten to the point that I just ignore the dumb remarks. They don't know what it is like to be in constant pain so they think that I can control it without the medications.

anyway....I'm rambling

Hugs
Scarred
What doesn't kill us only makes us fight back harder! :P


Pamela Neckpain
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2008
Total Posts : 1821
   Posted 2/22/2009 11:54 AM (GMT -7)   
Just lately when I get to feeling really bad or sad, I go to the puter and
play White Stripes version of "I think were gunna be friends." (It's also
Conan Obrian's faborite song.

It was the theme song from Napolean Dynamite which is a "feel good" movie
for sure.

fatherjohn, my friend's mother was BEST friends with Huey Lewis's mother.
They were neighbors on the 17-Mile Drive at Carmel-By-The-Sea.
Lewis does some song I really like ... uh ... I can't remember what 'tis!

Pamela Neckpain
MEDICAL CONDITIONS

Osteoarthritis all levels of spine right down to Coccyx,Spondilytis,Myofascial Pain
Fibromyalgia,Bulging Discs,Spinal Stenosis,Scoliosis,Osteopenia,Chronic Constipation
Carpel Tunel Syndrome, Attention Deficit Disorder,
Depression & Anxiety

Methadone for Pain, Xanax for Anxiety, and more, of course.


griffin
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2009
Total Posts : 56
   Posted 2/22/2009 12:17 PM (GMT -7)   
i write it down. on my bad days when it hurts just to blink i get a pen and write everything down that i am thinking and feeling. and when i am done i read it it seems just to get it off my chest helps. good luck and smile... becareful of writers cramps though
I smile through fibro


Tirzah
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2008
Total Posts : 2280
   Posted 2/22/2009 1:27 PM (GMT -7)   
I'm with Char about the "how are you question". I studied linguistics in college & they said that in modern America that "how are you" should be classified as a greeting, not as an interrogatory (i.e., question). So that's how I handle that particular question.

As far as any more depth, I really learned a lot from a good friend of mine who lost her 5 year battle with cancer a few years ago. I always hear people say that those who have cancer are shown more compassion, but that just wasn't the case with my friend. Sure, when she was first diagnosed, everyone wanted to help -- bringing meals, signing up to give rides, calling every night -- but after that they were just as callous about her dx as mine. People would say dumb things to her & her husband (who worked at the same company as her) like "it can't be that bad if you can come into work" or "you haven't lost your hair so it must not be very aggressive or you would have been given radiation" or "yeah. i had a cancer spot removed once. it was horrible. (as if a spot on the skin was the same as metastasized cancer and multiple organ failure)" They would just be really dumb & cruel. She was an amazing young woman who handled it all with more grace than could possibly be expected, and I learned a lot from her b/c of that.

So, if I really need to tell someone my medical issues (though I'm pretty private, so I keep them to myself as much as possible), I have a few explanations prepared ahead of time. I have a slightly longer initial explanation (gen. 3-5 min) where I tell them that I have a birth defect & as a result need to have multiple surgeries & am in quite a bit of pain on a regular basis as a result. Then I have the shorter explanation (about 30-60 sec. tops) where I just remind them that I have a lot of pain due to a birth defect & therefore need them to _______ so that I can participate.

I think people like to feel in control of their lives & the environment around them. If you just say that you are in pain & can't do as much as before, it leaves them feeling helpless. Some of the more empathetic individuals may try to figure out how to help, but if they can't they may feel frustrated or angry or resentful, none of which helps either of us. So I give them a specific suggestion. A few friends have parted ways with me over the years, but most of them have stuck by my side. When I am in really bad shape & need to go to the hospital, they are right there by my side & bring me goodies and cards and flowers (just like the cancer patients :) but otherwise, we try to keep the relationship as "normal" as possible. We try to talk about happier things b/c in general, imho, that makes for better relationships anyways.

I don't hide my disability from friends, family or co-workers, but I try to make it as unobtrusive as possible. I can't walk very fast & can't make it long distances. I can't sit for long periods of time. I need to take pain medication & use my stimulator remote. But other than dealing with those few things that people can see, I try to convince myself that there's really no benefit to me to take my hidden disability & try to force it out in the open. That doesn't ever seem to help in any way. So I have this HW group to talk about struggles with -- you guys are the best -- & a couple close friends who understand and are willing to have a two-way conversation talking about our struggles, but mostly I figure this is my own burden to bear. It's between me & god & sometimes a counselor to sort out all my thoughts, feelings & fears about having the chronic pain. I do what I can & then if I can think of some practical way that someone can help me, I say so. That practical help may be "I need someone to help brainstorm with me how I can ______ (get along with my PM, cope with pain, convince my boss to modify my workspace)" but I try to keep it short & specific.

For me, that's the difference between talking about pain & complaining about it. Complaining about it has no end-goal in sight. Talking about it has an identified purpose. Please don't think that I expect others to share my view, but that has worked pretty well for me most of the time so that is what I stick with.

GB,
frances

fatherjohn
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 999
   Posted 2/22/2009 2:59 PM (GMT -7)   
I really appreciate the responses. I think that most of us do not like to complain but we need people to talk to about our CP. At times even those closest to us have a hard time understanding. I have found that when people don't understand and go furthjer to the point that they don't care, even if we try to talk to them they think we are complaining. I too am a private person in may respects. I can talk about many things that have happened in my life and how they affected me but when it comes to the pain issue, the effects of the pain on me physically and mentally, as well as the side effects of the meds, I don't share much on a personal level. Sometimes I pick up on the attitude like some of you stated, get over it or get it taken care of like there is a simple pill or exercise that will remove it all. My superiors are starting to wonder if I can continue doing my job. As you may well know,Iare in the drug/alcohol recovery services business and with me on some of the meds that our students (clients) misused, there is suspicion about me becoming addicted to the drugs, and thus I would need to quit the drugs or quit the job. Thus, I can't complain and they don't want to talk about it because the don't see CP as a real ongoing problem. I will quit here as I did not intend to vent, which I know is alright in this forum but which I don't want to do right now.

fatherjohn
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 999
   Posted 2/22/2009 3:02 PM (GMT -7)   
As I reread my rsponse I saw I did a poor job on spelling. Forgive me. I have had a whole week of sleepless nights and have increased my meds to help and the mind is not working all that well.

Momcares
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 16
   Posted 2/22/2009 3:24 PM (GMT -7)   
My daughter doesn't complain that much and that worries me-she will talk to me, but when other people ask her "how are you doing" question she says, " fine". She is afraid people will think she is putting it on or it's all in her head!
Of course, I'm off the deep end most of the time, especially with doctors, lawyers and worker's comp that don't want to or just don't understand what she is and has been going through. Sorry I have no answer for you but I feel chronic pain patients need advocates to bring out to "the world" what they are going through! Don't worry about how much you complain, if people ask how you are doing, tell them the truth and you are trying to cope with it the best you can. That's all you can do.
My daughter has been in chronic pain for seven yrs after a work related injury that caused neuropathy pain in her thoracic vertebrae area. She has tried physical therapy, she has had 3 failed neural stimulators surgeries 2 which were implanted directly into her spine, morphine pain pump that was infected during implant -caused her to go septic and needed to be remove-took a year to heal.On Bipap w/ oyxgen. Doc has tried neurotin, lyrica, hydrocondone,methadone, percocet, etc. all with serious side effects, now on MS Contin 30mg 4x daily for pain and morphine 15mg for break through pain and proxac 40mg for depression, worker's comp wants her to try Suboxone-been through too much,not sure it won't cause severe adverse reactions and pain doc doesn't think it is a good idea. Tired of fighting it all. Momcares.


PAlady
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2007
Total Posts : 6795
   Posted 2/22/2009 3:32 PM (GMT -7)   
Fatherjohn,
First off - don't worry about spelling and such here! We all redesign the language from time to time (i used to be such a precise writer and prided myself on it....oh, well). FYI, if needed you can edit your own post by clicking on the pencil icon. But you don't need to do that for us!

I had wondered about the issue you mentioned re: your work as I know precisely what you're talking about. Before I was laid off from my pt. time, I helped occasionally with the D&A IOP program. This was before I was on as much medication as I'm on now. Add to that if I was still working there, I would have to now be using the hospital pharmacy. I also knew my mind was not as crisp as before, and I did strain to make sure I covered the important basis with each person I saw (life & death issues, etc.) but knew I missed other things. And paperwork took me extra time.

It's so unfair that you are/may be put in this Catch 22. Periodically we have someone come on here who is stuggling with both CP and addiction and it is a challenge. There is much that D&A needs to learn about that. Lives get ruined by undertreated pain, too. I don't know what the balance is.

You've also started a great post here. Skeye's comment about sometimes people's responses actually make it worse is ringing with me. Somehow I've known that, but maybe it's accepting that telling certain people actually will hurt me more than help. Uh-oh, I'm rambling again!

PaLady
Mom - Hugs to you!!

Tirzah
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2008
Total Posts : 2280
   Posted 2/22/2009 5:13 PM (GMT -7)   
John,
I'm really sorry if I said something that hurt you. That wasn't my intention. I'm sure it is tough with your job.

I can't recall whether I've mentioned this before, but maybe you could try Provigil to see if that helps your mind speed back up. I know my boss said I seemed much more alert & together once I started on it. She figured I must have cut back on my pain meds & I didn't bother to correct her. As long as you don't need do to drug tests for your job, maybe that would do the trick.

I think PA is right to say that few people make a distinction. If it's not all positive -- rainbows & puppy dogs -- then it's probably going to be labeled as complaining. I remember how I used to always be bothered that it seemed like I was always there for other people but when I needed help, or just a shoulder to cry on, they wanted nothing to do with me. So I had a choice: adjust my expectations, or be angry & bitter at a whole lot of people all the time. I look at the "heroes" praised by our society & consider the value we place on people who stay positive, press ahead & seem unaffected by their illnesses (one example, and a great story, is "The Last Lecture"). In short, they are resilient. And people in the U.S. value that very much. I saw a study, don't remember where right now, about societal roles & how people are not allowed to stay in the "sick" role for long periods of time or they end up being relabeled into the "outcast" role. For whatever reason, society rejects the notion of chronic illness. It may not be fair, it might not even be just, but it is the way it is.

So, here in Healing-Well-Land, I can be in that "sick" role & face reality, get support & trade ideas. But in the real world, I think that society expects its members to fuel the delusion that all is right with the world & that even in the face of adversity that we will all press on as if no such adversity exists. So I try to act accordingly. lol wink

Becoming undone
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2007
Total Posts : 927
   Posted 2/22/2009 6:11 PM (GMT -7)   
okay...so how do you all respond to "are you feeling better today?". There are times, when in dire straits, that I imagine pulling the face off that person and then screaming "fine". Too angry? I usually smile and say "I'm doing okay." Heck the the "how are you?" question can drive me nuts. Do you really want me to answer ANY of these questions truthfully...
Just wish we had better greeting systems sometime...not that I'm complaining....
"The earth laughs in flowers"


fatherjohn
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 999
   Posted 2/22/2009 6:15 PM (GMT -7)   
Frances, there was nothing you said that was hurtful. I appreciate your input. Thanks for replying. Your view on societies response to chronic illness is well taken. It ancient times (BC) people who had leprocy were required to yell ot to people who got close, "unclean, unclean". I hope we never get to that stage.

straydog
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2003
Total Posts : 13455
   Posted 2/22/2009 6:43 PM (GMT -7)   
I think we have talked before how we just don't about our pain to anyone much except out drs. Mainly, because we are sick of being in pain and know most around us are sick of us bring in pain too. They get tired of hearing it all and we get tired of hearing it all. So, when I had insurance coverage for mental health I saw a psychologist that was awesome. I quit complaining years ago cause no one wanted to hear it. They just could not understand it. I always compare chronic pain to this; if I am cutting a tomato with a sharp knife and cut my hand I am going to bleed and this is going to hurt. So, if hubby saw me do this then he understands why it hurts, he can see why it would hurt. Pain is invisible they cannot see it therefore, they do not understand it. The only people that truly understand chronic pain is another person with chronic pain.
 
If someone other than the dr asks me how I am doing, I say fine. Its easier to say fine than to say anything else.  
 
Susie                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               


Tirzah
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2008
Total Posts : 2280
   Posted 2/22/2009 8:42 PM (GMT -7)   
Becoming,
You make a good point, but I guess it's the same as if you're having a terrible morning & someone says "Good Morning" to you. Some people
will snipe back "It's not a good morning! It's a terrible morning!" but most of us would just pleasantly parrot back "Good Morning". I think it's
the same way with asking "How are you?" Just reply back "I'm fine. How are you?" You're not really fine & chances are you don't really have
the time or energy to hear how they're doing (if they were even willing to tell you), but it's considered polite to respond so we do.

I try not to think about it too much, but I do believe it is kind of a sad place we have come to in society that individualism is so glorified that we
don't dare turn to others for strength during our dark times unless we are paying them to listen. I am glad that counselors exist, but wish that we
could just be more connected to one another. Maybe in another lifetime. :)

John,
I think we're too pc to just come out with it like that. If people had to shout "unclean" it would force society to face the cruelty & injustice
of shunning people with chronic illnesses. Tragically, by shoving it under the rug it may take far longer to bring about change b/c those
not immediately affected can pretend that no problem exists.

skeye
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 2976
   Posted 2/22/2009 10:01 PM (GMT -7)   
Oh, how I hate that "how are you" question! I too always just answer "fine" or "okay."
It is much simpler than actually explaining how I am. Besides, most people could care less.
Like Frances said, the "how are you" question is more of a greeting than an inquisition.

Skeye

edt
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 773
   Posted 2/24/2009 6:35 AM (GMT -7)   
What I find interesting is some of my family, although they know my situation will say to me whats your problem today?
That remark cuts like a knife, I want to scream....what the $%#@! do you think is wrong? I usually calmly say I'm having
a bad day!
2 weeks ago I went to my old boss who does alternative medicine for injections (he does neural therapy which are trigger points but
instead of using Cortisone he uses Homeopathics and Procaine/B12) He said what did you do to yourself, you look awful....(it was while working for him
that the neck ruptured from repetitive motion) I thought to myself are you serious? I tried to smile and said just another day in my world of chronic pain
just give me the injections. I could not believe that I had to explain why I was there!
My best friend is my SAFE person to talk to, she never judges and understands when I am having a "bad day" (bad day means I can't tolerate the pain today)
I journal daily and always start my day by mentally listing things that I am grateful for, it does make a difference in how the day goes! Right after that I come to this
site for words of wisdom, all the posts let me know I'm not alone and that definitely makes life alot easier. My situation has made me more empathetic
to other peoples situations, I figure if when my feet hit the floor, if I am able to walk then it has to be a GREAT DAY!
edt

fatherjohn
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 999
   Posted 2/24/2009 11:03 PM (GMT -7)   
After reading these posts, I have come to a realization. If we have a hard time understanding Cp
and struggle with its effects, it is no surprise that others who don't have CP can't grasp it. It would
be great if we all could accept others and show compassion when needed. I just came through a
very difficult 3 days and got to the point that I wanted to scream its not fair, I did not ask for this.
Now I am back focusing on reality and settling in for the ride. As I stated earlier, I try not to complain
but the fact is I probably will from time to time. Oh if I were just stronger. If I were not so needy at
times. If I did not get depressed. If the side effects of my meds and the pain were not so difficult to
handle. Opps. I don't want to complain, but if I did this would be the right place. I will keep talking to
others and if they don't understand, they will have to bear that burden themselves.

skeye
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 2976
   Posted 2/25/2009 12:00 AM (GMT -7)   
Fatherjohn,

If you do feel the need to complain some more, you are more than welcome to complain to all of us!
We'll lend you an ear, and then complain right back to you about our own problems!
I'm sorry you've had such a rough couple of days! I hope your feeling somewhat better now!

Skeye

straydog
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2003
Total Posts : 13455
   Posted 2/26/2009 9:49 AM (GMT -7)   
John one thing I have learned is CP people are some of the strongest people walking on tis earth. Not everyone can endure what we do on a daily basis. So, therefore you are not weak by a long shot, you are a very strong person. Susie


Pete trips again!
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 1899
   Posted 2/26/2009 11:52 AM (GMT -7)   
GEEZE!!! You guys are so smart! I think I'm over my head hanging with you folks! This sounds like a philosophy class I had in college long ago, I was in over my head back then too!
I was going to write but maybe it will be better if I just hang and listen to the fart smellers> smart fellows> dag nabit Father John, you thought you were a bad smeller> speller? I'm the worst here by far!
I win da prize! Da, I'm in construction, der ain't no complainin or whinin in construction! I'm sick of hearing what a ***** I am so I just don't say anymore about "da pain"! I just cring & squint alot. I
love this place because EVERYONE GETS IT!!!!! Where else can you go and be w/ friends who know EXACTLY what you are going through?? No where!
Love Yuze Gize!!!
Little Petie wnet we-we-we-all the way home!!
Frances, you are SO Smart!!! You're my Hero!
56 years old, Surgury, Radical Prostatectomy 8/20/03, PSA 6.6, Gleason 3 + 3 = 6, Adenocarcinoma extent (moderate) Stage & Margin:T2NOMX, No Metastases, Organ Confined, bone scan: Neg. 3 1/2 years of depression after surgery prior to Hypogonadizm DX, Testosterone Theropy> new 2/6/09> 400mg injections every 2weeks . 56 and so glad to still be here to see my two sons grow up to be fine young men. They are both serving in the US Navy, one on an aircraft carrier heading for Hong Kong and the other on a Gator Freighter stationed in Norfolk, Va. I am one proud PaPa! 

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