Anyone ever used Biofeedback or a Shrink for Pain Mgmt?

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LakeMurray
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2007
Total Posts : 65
   Posted 10/27/2009 6:48 AM (GMT -7)   
I've been in severe chronic pain for over 10 years.  I'm sure much of it is psychosematic at this point, where it's all my brain/synapses/body knows how to act.  Therefore, when I really shouldn't be in much pain--my body thinks it is.  In other words, maybe my pain tolerance in my shoulders and lats is just far too sensitive.
 
I've heard/read a bit about psychiatrists and biofeedback before, but have never tried them.  Any thoughts?  Voodo "witch doctors" or not?  At this point, though, I'm not against trying voodoo.

skeye
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 2976
   Posted 10/27/2009 9:48 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi LakeMurray,

I tried biofeedback a year or two ago. My neurologist recommended it & sent me to a psychologist that specializes in biofeedback for chronic headaches (my pain isn't a headache, but it is facial). I met with him several times over a period of a month or two & he used a bunch of gadgets to teach me biofeedback (how to control muscle tension/relaxation, etc). Then it was up to me to practice those techniques on my own. I really did try, but I wasn't very good at it & nothing ever came of it, but that's not to say it won't work for you. It works very well for some people. I think it's worth trying. You haven't got anything to lose & have a lot to gain.

Skeye

PAlady
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2007
Total Posts : 6795
   Posted 10/27/2009 11:20 AM (GMT -7)   
LakeMurray,
It's definitely not voodoo. It sounds like you've read some about the brain and what happens with pain, and one of the ways to help break the pain feedback loop. It takes a lot of practice, and willingness to incorporate some form of biofeedback or deep relaxation/meditation into your daily life, but there is evidence that the brain is more amenable to change than we may now think.

Someone trained in dealing with pain would be the best teacher. Biofeedback is useful for many things, including lowering blood pressure, managing stress, etc. so it can't ever hurt to learn it. It may not cure the pain, but should be able to help moderate it. I think there are other factors with each case, like how much actual nerve damage has been done, among other things.

It definitely can't hurt. And a good pain psychologist likely can teach it to you.

PaLady

LakeMurray
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2007
Total Posts : 65
   Posted 10/27/2009 3:59 PM (GMT -7)   
Thanks a bunch.. Now if I can just find someone who does Biofeedback in or around Columbia, SC.  Not happening so far.

Mrs. Dani
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2009
Total Posts : 2787
   Posted 10/27/2009 4:21 PM (GMT -7)   
 
   Dear Murry,
 
     Good evening. My name is Dani. It is a pleasure to meet you. *hugg*
 
      I saw a pain psychologist for a very long time. I didnt understand pain, nor was I able to effectivly communicate how I was feeling. I would say "I don't feel so hot". Instead of "There is a deep pressure at the base of my spine that stings and the pain spikes, when too severe, cause me to vomit or pass out".  Big difference.
 
     So, I was taught everything about pain. The mechanics of pain ~~> the effects of long term pain ~~~> How to effectivly communicate what I felt.  Recoganizing the "warning signs" and reacting to them (calling for help).....  Then cognitive behavioural therapy.
 
      Then it was off to bio feedback. I spent months learning bio feedback which is extremly useful for pain management. I still enjoy it on a daily basis. Also, much later the same techniques would be used to help calm me during "out patient surgicals" & while in "twilight state" (same key phrases) IE steroid injections, surgeries, extensive / painful tests.
 
       I guess each person has their own needs and wants from their doctors. I had a very hard time understanding that the pain was never decreasing... it was my body adapting to the new levels. So... by the time I asked for help... I had allowed things to progress for far too long.
 
       One thing I can say with certianty is that I wouldnt be the "me" I am today without the help of my pain psychologist. No voodoo needed.  :-)   Hope that helped a little. It was a very long spring / summer journey for me, but was needed, in my case, no doubt about it. Was well worth it, for me, my family and most of all my doctors.
 
*hugg*
   dani

 

 

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood

 

 


Chartreux
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 9622
   Posted 10/27/2009 6:24 PM (GMT -7)   
I see a pain management psychologist and it helps along with pain management doctors, physical therapies, recently started traction...
all these working together helps..that's my opinion...
hope you can get a low pain day...
**********************************************
* Asthma, Allergies, Osteoarthritis, Spinal Stenosis, Degenative Disc (Lower Lumbar S1-L3 and Cervical C5,C6, C8 and T1), Fibromyalgia, Gerd,
Enlarged Pituitary Gland, Sjogren's, Ocular Migraines, mild carpel tunnel, ect.... "Would be nice if we could use the edit button in real life"...

********>^..^<********>^..^<********>^..^<********


PAlady
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2007
Total Posts : 6795
   Posted 10/27/2009 7:49 PM (GMT -7)   
LakeMurray,
You can first ask your PM doctor if he/she knows of or works with any pain psychologists/therapists. If not, you can ask your insurance company if they have anyone listed with that specialty. And you can get a list of names of therapists from your insurance company and start calling them and asking if they know someone in the area who specializes in work with CPPs. Often the therapists in a location know the specialties of others.

In the meantime, you can start learning some deep relaxation using guided imagery all by yourself. The only thing biofeedback adds are monitors that let you know (a beep, a light, some signal) when you've lowered you heart rate or blood pressure to a certain stage. There are other aspects that can be added, but learning to relax your body and mind is a great start.

Some excellent resources are made by Belleruth Naparstek, who is a licensed therapist who started her work with the Cleveland Clinic, and now trains a lot of people on a national level. I have no financial connection whatsoever (other than that I buy and use her materials, and recommend them), so I think it's ok to give her website. It's
www.healthjourneys.com.

Her material is used in a lot of research studies because she makes sure the music and the imagery are all based on accurate science.

Good luck!

PaLady

Mrs. Dani
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2009
Total Posts : 2787
   Posted 10/28/2009 7:22 AM (GMT -7)   
...when coupled with therapy...  if it is possible, and you can do it (there are some risks) It is a wonderful tool.
 

Biofeedback defined

Biofeedback is a type of complementary and alternative medicine called mind-body therapy. It's designed to enable you — in mind-over-matter fashion — to use your thoughts and will to control your body. Biofeedback is based on the idea, confirmed by scientific studies, that people have the innate potential to influence with their minds many of the automatic, involuntary functions of their bodies.

To help you develop this ability, a biofeedback specialist uses signals from special monitoring equipment to teach you to control certain body functions and their responses, such as:

  • Brain activity
  • Blood pressure
  • Muscle tension
  • Heart rate
  • Skin temperature
  • Sweat gland activity

You can use biofeedback to help treat many physical and mental health problems when you've learned to recognize and control these functions and responses.

 

*huggs*

   dani


 

 

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood

 

 


LakeMurray
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2007
Total Posts : 65
   Posted 10/28/2009 8:03 AM (GMT -7)   

Wow. Thanks for all the info.  Y'all are the best.

Mark


Scarred_for_life
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2008
Total Posts : 1559
   Posted 10/28/2009 10:39 AM (GMT -7)   
Hiya LakeMurry! I'd like to welcome you aboard our little crazy train. I do wish that you weren't in pain, but alike to you I was in a place where I didn't think anything would work to bring my pain down. Now with that said.....I have been seeing a pain psychologist for the past 6 months. Talk about a wonderful experience!!! I have now learned what signals to watch for that increase my pain and how to communicate my bad days (and good) to everyone around me. Although I still cannot stand for any more then two min. my pain is now much better as I have now gone from a 10 to a 6. Each day is a blessing when the pain is down and when its up I use every technique that I have in my arsenal to try to combat it or distract myself enough to bring the pain down.

Funny how a person can go from "gee will this really work?" to "Dang your good doc!" My stress level has been lowered by learning to deal with my family and its just so wonderful to actually be able to do things, (its the little things that feel like amazing accomplishments) and be able to have a semi normal life (somewhat LOL)

Anyway this probably doesn't make any sense, but try it...it just might work. :-)


Hugssssssss

Scarred
What doesn't kill us only makes us fight back harder! :P

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