unsure if I want to risk the complications pain pump can cause

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floridalady
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2010
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 2/28/2010 3:46 PM (GMT -7)   
I went through the morphine pain pump trial and it worked beautifully except that shortly after the catheter was placed in my spine I developed cramping in my lower buttocks. I complained of this when I was discharged the following morning and the doctor said it could be from the morphine. Later that night I had severe spasms in both legs and my lower buttocks and had to go to the emergency room. I was given a strong muscle relaxer injection and a shot for pain and put on muscle relaxer pills, 800mg advil and prednisone for 5 days. I only took the advil a day and a half and wound up with severe abdominal and esophogus pain and had to stop taking it. I also stopped the prednisone. The doctor said the pump worked well for me  and suggested I have it implanted. Currently I am reading all of the problems it can cause including death if it fails or the leads disconnect and I would like to hear from those that have the pump and have or have not had problems and how long they have it. I have osteoarthritis pain in my neck radiating into my arms and head caused by bulging discs and degenerative disc disease that causes severe burning in my lower back into my buttocks, along with chronic pancreatitis. The only med I take currently is 5mg of oxyir to sleep as I don't want to get hooked on it. At times I have to take two pills as I can't tolerate the pain.

Blessedx8
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2008
Total Posts : 3193
   Posted 2/28/2010 4:01 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi Floridalady...

I, too, went through the pain pump trial (only with Dilaudid instead of morphine); like you, I had complications after what was a fairly successful trial... I got meningitis and spent 30 days in the hospital. That was about 18 months ago. Since then, my health hasn't been stable enough to try again... but since then, my oral meds seem to be holding me better than they did before.

There's several people here on the board that have pumps, and that are quite happy with them. The key seems to be finding the right doctor.
As with anything, there are risks involved... but after all the research I've done, for me, the risks aren't so worrisome.

Just curious about one thing... have you tried all of the oral medications? 5mg of OxyIR (at bedtime) is such a small dose of medication... just wondering if you've exhausted all the meds/dosages available. Hope you don't mind me asking you this :)

The reason I'll probably ultimately end up with the pain pump is because I'm 36 and already quite tolerant to all of the oral medications. I really can't go up too much higher...dosage wise... on the oral meds. But I've tried just about everything, in just about every strength. So, for me, the pain pump is basically a "last resort" option.

Anyway, I hope others will share there experience with the pain pump; and that you ultimately make the right decision for you.

Good luck, Tina
Main Health Problems: Dysautonomia/POTS; CFS/Fibromyalgia; Severe Hypertension; Hypothyroidism; Hypoadrenalism; Mixed (Obstructive/Central) Sleep Apnea - on Auto BiPap; Depression/Anxiety; Severe Vitamin D Deficiency

Pain Issues: Cervical/Thoracic back pain; migraines; carpal tunnel syndrome; widespread joint/muscle pain, nerve pain in hands/arms/feet; Future Plans: Intrathecal Pain Pump; already completed trial (Sept, 2008); awaiting my decision for implantation

Meds: MS Contin; Dilaudid; Actiq; Soma ; Neurontin; Atenolol; Midodrine; Phenergan/Zofran/Reglan; Effexor(depression)/Ativan(anxiety); Synthroid; Prednisone; and on the list goes...


bsjaguar
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2009
Total Posts : 974
   Posted 3/1/2010 3:59 AM (GMT -7)   
Welcome, Florida Lady! Has your doctor tried any injections for the bulging disc in your cervical spine or lumbar spine? I would think, this is my opinion, that there are other options to try before jumping to the pump. I also have arthritis & ddd in my lumbar spine which I am in the process of having diagnostic injections to see if I'm a candidate for radio frequency abalation, which is where they heat the nerve to deaden it so it won't send pain signals to the brain. Also, like Tina said the amount of meds you are taking orally could be changed to an extended release med to help with pain control.

Hope this helps but maybe you've already tried other methods of pain control. Have you had physical therapy?
---Jag---
 
DDD, osteoarthritis, facet syndrome, fusion surgeries C-5/7 & L-4/5 both in 2006, torn meniscus surgeries left knee 2000 & 2002, buldging disc L-2/3


floridalady
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2010
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 3/1/2010 5:52 AM (GMT -7)   
I truly appreciate your responses and I have tried other oral meds but I am extremely sensitive to them and unable to tolerate them and or allergic to them. I have had epidural injections without success, botox injected into my cervical spine caused pain much worse than anyone could ever imagine. Basically I was unable to move any of my joints, bend, sit stand or lie down, it seems the dose given me was too high for me to tolerate and the pain specialist said it was the suggested dose for all patients as this lasted for three months and my husband even had to do the cooking as when I moved my arms or bent my head down the pain was excruciating.  It seems logical to think that since he knew my history and problems with oral medications and cannot tolerate aniti inflammatory drugs that he would have tried a smaller dose at first. I did not return to him as the next procedure he wanted to do was the radio treatments on my lumbar spine and I lost all faith in him and would never go back to him.
 
Physical therapy and accupuncture did not help at all and my new doctor said my MRI revealed a crack in the bone in my lumbar spine which is causing the severe burning in my buttocks when I sit down along with the usual degenerative disk disease which I have had since 1987. I am 68 years old.
 
The reason the pain pump was suggested by my current pain specialist who was highly reccommended is because I also have chronic pancreatitis due to scar tissue from two major pancrease surgeries that were necessary due to a pancreatic divisim which caused a severe stenosis of my pancreas ducts and about a year and a half ago oral antibiotics that were given to me while undergoing two pain pump trials agrivated my pancrease so badly that my enzymes shot up to 2,500. I was hospitalized for a month and finally had to have a celiac nerve block to stop the pancreatic pain. The doctor feels the pain pump will help alleviate the pain from all of these conditions with less side effects than the ones that are caused by oral pain medications.
 
I only take the pain med at night and am able to deal with the pain during the day, at times it is difficult but I manage. If it gets really bad again along with an attack of pancreatitis I don't think I will hesitate in going for the pain pump.
 
Good luck to each of you that responded, I am so greatful to have had your replies so quickly.  As I mentioned I don't want to become addicted to pain meds as I have met and spoken with others that have the pump and it seems they were all on very high doses of pain medications prior to having the pump installed and went into withdrawal prior to having the pump surgically implanted.  I guess I am lucky so far!

straydog
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2003
Total Posts : 13481
   Posted 3/1/2010 12:08 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi FloridaLady,
 
I hope you see my post here on pumps, I have one and have had it since June of 05. I see your dr is saying it will help pain in multiple areas and I do not believe this is correct. My pump is in because of severe low back pain. The catheter is positioned in one certain area in my spine. There are no leads with a pain pump. You have one catheter and one only. It does not affect pain in my neck, upper back, no where but in my lower back. If you only need medication at night time, then no I would not have a pump put in. I ended up with the pump because of not being able to tolerate medications of any kind well.
 
The pump can be a wonderful thing for someone with CP, but it comes with it's own set of problems and drawbacks. The drs don't tell you it is next to impossible to ever switch PM drs and finding someone else willing to take you on because you have a pump. It is like anything else it does have its drawbacks. I urge you to do a search here at the forum on pain pumps. You should be able to pull up a lot of info pumps. Pumps are for people in severe pain 24/7, not sporadic or anything like that.
 
I did not have to go off my pain meds either when my pump was put in.  Finding a dr that is very educated and trained in pumps and the compounds that go in them is a must. Otherwise, you will end up being in severe pain and a dr too stupid to admit a pump patient is over his head, this happened to me. My PM dr that had me have the pump put in talked a good story to me, that is all it was, talk. All that wonderful time he told me about being pain free was a bunch of bull, he was over his head and had no clue and I suffered because of his ignorance. Finally, in 2008, he went back into anesthesiology and referred his pump patients to a retired neurosurgeon who was taking care of pumo patients only. This new dr had over a decade of experience with pumps and is the top pump dr in the state of Texas. Oh, if she had been my dr in the beginning with this pump my life would have been so much better off.
 
If I can answer any questions let me know and please do a search here at the forum you will find a lot of info there.
 

crohns disease dx 2002 & small bowel resection, still looking for remission whatever that is, chronic pain 22 yrs, added ulcerative colitis 6-05 to the mix, high blood pressure 28 yrs, aortic heart valve insuffiency, depression, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis lumbar spine, scoliosis lumbar spine, peripheral neuropathy hands & feet, COPD & on oxygen therapy, lupus & psoriasis and psoratic arthritis. Several other health issues just not enough room to list it all. Too many surgeries to list and too many medications to list. Currently on 17 different daily medications. Intrathecal pain pump implanted June 05.


floridalady
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2010
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 3/1/2010 5:51 PM (GMT -7)   
When I had the pain pump trial in the hospital it did relieve the pain in neck, head and lower back. I am puzzled as to why it didn't work for you. My pain in my lower back is constant but I refuse to take anything during the day and there are days when it is very difficult for me and I give in and take the pill. I take a minimal dose because of the side effects and I too am unable to tolerate pain meds and medicines in general as I am very sensitive.

Thank you for your advice and I definitely will continue to check this out in the forum. The lady that I spoke to originally from pumpsters has had it for three years and loves it. I too tried to get on pumpsters and signed up with no response. I wonder if medtronics tries to keep people from getting in touch regarding their pump. She also said that it is very difficult to find another doctor that will treat you after the pump is installed. I am leary of doctors as I know what is involved and truly wish you well and thank you for your reply.

Be well
Florida Lady

straydog
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2003
Total Posts : 13481
   Posted 3/1/2010 6:21 PM (GMT -7)   
FloridaLady, you are the first person I know of that the pump helped with pain in multiple places, wow. I am impressed. I wonder where the dr would place the catheter permanently in you. When I had my trial I thought I had died and gone to heaven, I was pain free for the first time in a very long time, too short lived. That is the beauty of this forum we learn new things from each other and I am so glad you posted here and hope you will continue to do so.
 
It took a year before my dr got my pump titrated up to where it needed to be.  When that dose  stopped working the increases were so minimal that the pain was never under control even with the weak BT meds. My dr was just under educated and way over his head. My new dr that he referred me to was shocked when she saw me. I could not stand up straight even walking with a cane. My medical records reflected a constant 9 on pain level for two years prior. My current dr said no patient should have a pain level that high for that long. My new dr is wonderful and she has given me a new life and I am so thankful for her. But the other one robbed me of two years of my life that I can never get back. My dr said the dosage in my pump when she saw me the first time is what you start people out on, if that tells you anything. That is why I warn anyone about pumps, make sure you dr knows everything about a pump that there is to know and they must also know medications that are used on the pumps. Your dr can make your pump either a success or a failure.
 
I joined Pumpsters too and it took several weeks before I was notified I could be one of their members. You may want to send them an email and ask what the holdup is. I know who ever is in charge of that site does a check to make sure the person is really who they say they are, lol. Why, I have no idea. He had trouble verifying me because of a phone number given did not match what was on record with what he was searching on me, lol. Medtronics could care less about a place like Pumpsters. I know sometimes if the guy is away or sick it delays anyone wanting to join their group.
 
Take care.
 

crohns disease dx 2002 & small bowel resection, still looking for remission whatever that is, chronic pain 22 yrs, added ulcerative colitis 6-05 to the mix, high blood pressure 28 yrs, aortic heart valve insuffiency, depression, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis lumbar spine, scoliosis lumbar spine, peripheral neuropathy hands & feet, COPD & on oxygen therapy, lupus & psoriasis and psoratic arthritis. Several other health issues just not enough room to list it all. Too many surgeries to list and too many medications to list. Currently on 17 different daily medications. Intrathecal pain pump implanted June 05.


Stella Marie
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2005
Total Posts : 601
   Posted 3/2/2010 4:52 PM (GMT -7)   
Welcome Florida!
 
Like Straydog Suzie, I also have a Medtronic pump.  I love it - love it - loveit!  It totally changed my life.   However, all of her warning and advice are excellant.  I had mine implanted by one teaching institution, but the pain doctor lacked in pump technology.  It took me about 18 months of h*ll to find my current doctor.  You are married to the doctor that implants your pump.  My current doctor is fabulous.  He knows compounding and doses like no tomorrow.
 
My pump was a last resort.  I had maxed out on one of the meds in my pump (Baclofen) and was at very high pain medication doses.  My pump gave me back my life.  Suzie is so right when she says that you need to investigate the doctor and his pump training.
 
Good luck.

Stella Marie

Moderator for Chronic Pain

Rare neurodegenerative /movement disorder called “Multiple System Atrophy”.  Mobility issues,, neuropathic pain,  spasticity, myoclonus, central apnea, collagenous colitis, joint and body pain, swallowing and respitory  involvement,  Implants: intrathecal pump & neurostimulator.  Extra features: O2 & wheelchair.

 

 


BobinmidMO
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2010
Total Posts : 39
   Posted 3/3/2010 3:21 PM (GMT -7)   
My Intrathecal Morphine Pump has given be back my life, and I'm now on my 2nd one.  I got my first around 6 years ago, and then the battery died so last year I got a new one installed.  I don't know how, but trust me, for some these little suckers are just great!  They do mess up the way your pants will fit, and it's not always easy to bend over, but when it comes to evening out the pain levels, pumps can really help.  But beware, they don't get rid of the pain all the time all the way.  Instead if you're like me, they'll use it with oral medications as well.  Is there risk, or course, but if the pain is bad enough, I'm sorry to say that's when we'll do anything to just get the pain to ease up - and that's when people like you and me need a pump the most.  Good luck, and don't let fear stop you from getting help you really need.  Bob.
After an accident in  1997 crushed the nerves in my pelvis, halfway down the calf and at the fibular head (knee), my left leg slowly started to turn color from the foot up, along with swelling and temp change.  Within 2 weeks I was diagnosed with RSD.  Within 6 months, I had purple, red and some black area's almost to the knee area.  By 1999 I landed in a wheelchair and started a life taking narcotics all the time.
 
In 2004 I got an Intrathecal morphine pump, and I just got it replaced around a year ago, so now I'm on my 2nd model.
 
5 years ago the RSD spread to my right leg and has done around 80% of the damage it did to my left leg in half the time.
 
1 1/2 years ago I went septic, and the infection did go body-wide.  After 2 days in the hospital I then had a clot in my lungs.  Both should have killed me, but this time I got lucky.  Meanwhile I've been battling blood clots for the last 4 years.
 
Last fall the doctor's decided I needed to have both legs amputated above the knee's, but I decided I could only handle one at a time, so I went with the left leg since that one is a little worse off.  The right leg is now black all the way to the knee.
 
I haven't slept in a bed for over 12 years and have instead accepting the fact that I can only sleep in a chair upright.  Since I'm in RSD Phase III, it's still progressing, but I refuse to go on a pity party because those who do, party alone.  Thanks to a wife of 27 years and great family and friend support, I'm only half nuts half the time.
 
Guess that about say's it all.  Bob.


BobinmidMO
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2010
Total Posts : 39
   Posted 3/7/2010 2:54 PM (GMT -7)   
With the meds you're currently taking, I'm a bit shocked that any doctor would consider a pump as your next step. Trust me, morphine pumps are used when the patient is at the end of his rope, but not in situations where there are many options still out there, such as your situation.

I'd first look into more oral narcotics. I know that you're scared to death that you'll get hooked. Well did you know that less than 3% of those who take narcotic who live with chronic pain ever get addicted? That's right, because your body simply eats the narcotics up, and so you never get hooked. I've been on OxyContin and OxyIR for over 11 years now, and I could stop taking them anytime I want without going out of my mind with withdrawls. I sort of know, when I accidently mess up on my medications and miss one of the dosages for 12 hours at a pop. Did I hurt more, of course I did, but I never have bounced off the walls, or thought I was going to die just because I missed a dosage. It's only because of the little bowl I put my meds that I found out I messed up on them at all.

I wouldn't go with a pump till after you've really worked through the wonders of oral narcotics such as OxyContin. A 10mg or 20 mg twice a day would probably be more than enough, and yet you'd be so much more comfortable, you could really enjoy more of life again.

While a morphone pump gave me back my life, I'm at high limits of Oxycontin and OxyIR, so we didn't have anywhere else to go, but in your case you still do. Pumps are a pain in the side, because they are a hockey puck device but when you have no other choice, their a godsend. From what you said, it sounds like you still have other options, so I'd look at those a lot more carefully first. But please don't worry you'll be on the next Intervention Show because you're taking OxyContin. With chronic pain, you need never worry about becoming a drug head. Take care, Bob.
After an accident in  1997 crushed the nerves in my pelvis, halfway down the calf and at the fibular head (knee), my left leg slowly started to turn color from the foot up, along with swelling and temp change.  Within 2 weeks I was diagnosed with RSD.  Within 6 months, I had purple, red and some black area's almost to the knee area.  By 1999 I landed in a wheelchair and started a life taking narcotics all the time.
 
In 2004 I got an Intrathecal morphine pump, and I just got it replaced around a year ago, so now I'm on my 2nd model.
 
5 years ago the RSD spread to my right leg and has done around 80% of the damage it did to my left leg in half the time.
 
1 1/2 years ago I went septic, and the infection did go body-wide.  After 2 days in the hospital I then had a clot in my lungs.  Both should have killed me, but this time I got lucky.  Meanwhile I've been battling blood clots for the last 4 years.
 
Last fall the doctor's decided I needed to have both legs amputated above the knee's, but I decided I could only handle one at a time, so I went with the left leg since that one is a little worse off.  The right leg is now black all the way to the knee.
 
I haven't slept in a bed for over 12 years and have instead accepting the fact that I can only sleep in a chair upright.  Since I'm in RSD Phase III, it's still progressing, but I refuse to go on a pity party because those who do, party alone.  Thanks to a wife of 27 years and great family and friend support, I'm only half nuts half the time.
 
Guess that about say's it all.  Bob.


2010tlo
New Member


Date Joined Jun 2010
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 6/28/2010 11:03 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi, I hope someone is still checking these posts.  I am in need of help.  My mother suffers from failed back syndrome.  She has had 3 surgeries at her L4-L5 area and now as a result of an automobile accident has herniations in her thorasic spine and cervical spine.  Surgery isn't an option at this time for the thorasic or cervical due to the high probability of death.  This is what surgeons have said and won't operate.  As a result of the compounded issues and immense pain, she decided to have a morphine pump installed.  She went in March 2009 for the trial, which was only overnight and I have read in many different forums that people have trials for 5 days.  Is 5 days the proper trial period or is it to each his own?  The trial was great!  She felt amazing, she could walk without having terrible pains shooting down her legs and feet.  The only pain she had was muscle pain from all the years of that pain being masked by the other problems.  She went back in July 2009 to have the pump installed and it's been a nightmare ever since.  Pretty much since the day she had it installed, she has not been able to stand up straight.  She is very hunched over and looking at the floor.  Also, the pain has not gone away and now her spine is poking out at the installation site.  Her Dr put her on oral morphine as well and we had no idea, but she is allergic to oral morphine, which we found out about 3 months ago.  It makes her sick to her stomach and she can't eat, she lost about 20lbs.  Also, she was very unsteady all the time and had fallen many times.  Once in Nov she fell outside and landed on her face and now has a permanent scar from the patch of skin on her cheek that was scraped off.  But like I said the Dr finally took her off the oral morphine about 3 months ago when I went with her to see him and told him all the things that were happening to her and how they weren't acceptable.  He then mentioned that it could be because of the oral morphine. Since she has been off the oral morphine, she hasn't fallen and has actually been eating.  Thank god.  So, my problem now is, I can't find ANYONE who will even look at her to give a second opinion on her pump installation.  Her current Dr says everything is fine, but why wouldn't he say that, he's doesn't want to get slammed with a lawsuit.  But honestly she would just like the opportunity to have it removed if it is in fact causing the additional problems (not standing up straight and her spine is poking thru at the installation site) she is having.  I have called the Cleveland Clinic and they have one specialist there that deals with these things, however he won't work with anyone who has had a pump installed by anyone else.  I have called the Mayo Clinic but was informed that 2 Drs had just left them and they were rescheduling all their appts and nothing was available until the end of Nov 2010, but they weren't accepting any new patients anyways.  Can anyone help me or give some advice on who to contact.  My mother is only 52 and I've just applied to get her a hoveround chair because she is having such trouble standing up straight and walking.  We are in Florida as well.    PLEASE HELP  confused

BobinmidMO
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2010
Total Posts : 39
   Posted 6/28/2010 11:57 AM (GMT -7)   
Wow talk about being between the rock and the hard place - I know of any more perfect example.
 
First you have to accept that we're not talking about cheap technology here.  My first pump 6 1/2 years ago was 20 grand.  When they installed my 2nd one last year it was 30 grand, not to mention the cost of maintaining the thing so there is a financial component to this problem.  Clearly with the complications that include such suffering you really don't have a choice but remove the thing, but this might be an uphill battle.  Because of there being this many complications it's not hard to understand why other doctors are avoiding this situation like the plague since why would someone else want to add their names to a medical chart that's already in medical jeopardy.
 
Best of luck, but I have a feeling that only your tenacity and fortitude is going to get you through this most sad situation.  My heart really goes out to you, Bob.
After an accident in  1997 crushed the nerves in my pelvis, halfway down the calf and at the fibular head (knee), my left leg slowly started to turn color from the foot up, along with swelling and temp change.  Within 2 weeks I was diagnosed with RSD.  By 1999 I landed in a wheelchair and started a life taking narcotics all the time. In 2004 I got an Intrathecal morphine pump &5 years ago the RSD spread to my right leg and has done around 80% of the damage it did to my left leg in half the time. 1 1/2 years ago I went septic, and the infection did go body-wide.  After 2 days in the hospital I then had a clot in my lungs.  Both should have killed me, but this time I got lucky.  Meanwhile I've been battling blood clots for the last 4 years.  A year ago my left leg was ampuated above the knee after ging septic.  Guess that about say's it all.  Bob.


straydog
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2003
Total Posts : 13481
   Posted 6/28/2010 12:58 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi 2010,
 
Welcome to Healing Well's chronic pain forum.  I am glad that you found us but very sorry to hear what all is going on with your Mom. I have a pump too and I can understand your situation very well.
 
I will tell you it is very, very, very difficult to get another dr to look at a patient that has an intrathecal pain pump. Why, I have no idea, I found this out the hard way when my dr decided to quit pain mgt. He did refer all of his patients to another dr, but when I asked if one of the other drs in the clinic could take over my care that is when he dropped the bomb that other drs will not see you with an existing pump. My gut feeling is it is a liability type thing the drs do not want to get involved in, or they may think the patient really did not need the pump in the first place. 
 
My mother was terminal with cancer and her dr put her on oral morphine and she could not tolerate it. She started vomiting and ended up in the hospital dehydrated and lost 3 pounds in two days, it was awful so I know what you are talking about. The dr told me well most people don't tolerate oral morphine, I am like then why did you give it to her knowing this, I was livid. His stupidity cost her five days in the hospital and she was very ill. Once the morphine got out of her system she was much better and on a different pain medication too.
 
Has your mom's dr tried any other pain medications in her pump? Many of us have combinations of medications in their pumps. I have Dilaudid, Clonidine, Bupivicaine and Sufentanil. This combination has worked very well for me. My first dr was not educated enough in pain pumps or the medications used in them so the last two years I was under his care I was in horrible pain and was bent over and could not stand up straight. When he quit practicing and the new dr saw me that he referred me too, she was shocked at the condition I was in. I still cannot stand up straight and probably never will, walking bent over for two years ruined my posture. My pain is under much, much better control with my new dr, I have quality life now.  I do walk with a cane. If not being able to stand straight and having trouble walking sounds like more from her surgeries than what a pump would cause, but I am not a dr either. My pump does stick out in the front somewhat and more so since I have lost some weight.
 
I am not sure I am understanding what you are saying out your mom's spine sticking out. Usually pumps are implanted in the stomach, sort of to the side above the beltline. Now they do make an incision in your lower back and they feed the catheter from the spine around to the front where the pump is, of course all of this is done on the inside.
 
I do wish you luck in your search and hope that you can find someone willing to look at your mom. Please let us know what you find out. If you don't mind would you start your own post and not be on another person's post. That way everyone can see your post and reply. All you have to do is go to the top and where it says  new post and type new member with questions on pain pumps or something like that. Posting on an older thread most of the time is not seen by that many. If possible please bring your mom to the forum and have her introduce herself too. Take care.
 

crohns disease dx 2002 & small bowel resection, still looking for remission whatever that is, chronic pain 22 yrs, added ulcerative colitis 6-05 to the mix, high blood pressure 28 yrs, aortic heart valve insuffiency, depression, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis lumbar spine, scoliosis lumbar spine, peripheral neuropathy hands & feet, COPD & on oxygen therapy, lupus & psoriasis and psoratic arthritis. Several other health issues just not enough room to list it all. Too many surgeries to list and too many medications to list. Currently on 17 different daily medications. Intrathecal pain pump implanted June 05.

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