First time seeing a pain management doctor, some advice needed.

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DilutedReform
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2010
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 11/3/2010 3:10 AM (GMT -7)   
Hello,

*** Note: Sorry, this is quite drawn out, but I felt I should give a full background. The Too-Long-Didn't-Read version pertaining to the pain management doctor questions is in the 6th paragraph. ***

I am a 23 year old male who was diagnosed with Chronic Ulcerative Colitis and Irritable Bowel Syndrome going on 8 years now. I had been experiencing symptoms for probably 5 years prior to that, but my general practitioner assumed I was faking it to try and get out of school. Well, 8 years ago, I ended up in the hospital in excrutiating pain as well as pretty much pure blood and mucus in my stool. Further testing revealed the CUC, and through the course of the next year, IBS was diagnosed in addition to it. I have tried every drug out there know to man. Asacol, Asacol HD, Bentanyl, Omeprazole, 6MP, and pretty much any other pill they could throw my way. I was also on doses of Prednisone up to 120mg for months at a time, would get weaned off, and then put back on right away.

It didn't stop there, after all that was found not to work, even at their maximum doses, I started Remicade, the miracle drug. It worked amazingly for about 2-3 years, and then I developed an allergic reaction to it. It was a very hard time for me, I was living a near normal life. After 3 infusions in a row of me having chest pains, flushing, fainting, and them having to load me up with 200-300mg of Benadryl via IV, they discontinued it due to the risks involved. The next step was Cimzia. This didn't work one bit, and was a huge waste of time, effort, and hard earned money. Up next, Humira, which I was told not to be hopeful of from the beginning due to its similarity with Cimzia. I wasn't hopeful, which turned out to be a good thing, it didn't work either. I have literally tried everything out there, from these high tech pills, to high dose probiotics, to herbal remedies. My doctor refused all this time to prescribe me any sort of pain medication, which I figured was normal.

Then to add to it, I went into an emotional 'breakdown' of sorts. I started to get severely depressed, and had been diagnosed with social anxiety disorder. So to add to the cocktail of 40-something pills a day I take, I also started taking anti-depressants, in the form of Wellbutrin, Zoloft, and Cymbalta, as well as anti-anxiety pills, in the form of Klonopin, Xanax and Cymbalta (Serves a dual purpose). I had to quit my job or risk being fired, it was too difficult to go. I had to withdraw from college, even though I was a 4.0 student, I just couldn't handle the stresses and pressures of being around people. The thought of being called on in class really got me worked up. On top of this, I have had other issues develop, including multiple cases of Acute Pancreatitis and Duodenitis, which are both extremely painful and I tend to have a recurring case of it once or twice a year for the last few.

Then I met a few people on campus who have a similar story, though quite mild compared to mine. They are currently on mid-level doses of Vicodin or Percocet as well as one on a low dose OxyContin 2-3x a day (I want to say 10 or 20mg). This of course includes occasional Prednisone use, and Cimzia or Humira, but that's it. They said that they were extremely surprised I wasn't on any pain management of any form. This sparked an interest in me to contact my gastroenterologist again and bring this up. He shot me down again. Extremely frustrated, I contacted my new general practitioner. He gave me a script for 3 5/500 Vicodin a day. I can't even describe the relief this brought me. It was like I was given a second chance. My mood improved greatly within a few days, I was able to function again, not at full force, but probably 70%, which was like a gift from God himself.

So I followed his script to the T for the first month. I noticed near the end of the month though that I was started to feel a bit worse again, I assume was due to a tolerance forming. I went back near the end of the script and talked to him again about this. He upped the dose from 3 5/500's to 4 5/500's a day, with explicit permission to use more on certain days if I found I needed to do so, though due to the acetaminophen in the pills, he said maximum 8/day, and I could not go over my 120/month. Well, once again, I was feeling great for a few weeks, taking two in the morning, and two an hour or two before bed. My problem has always been forming a tolerance to most medications relatively quickly, happened with the Klonopin and Xanax as well. So after about two weeks, I started the downward slope again, despite trying to be as positive about it.

I called him back again, but didn't want to seem like I'm a drug seeker, I truly just want to live a normal life again. I said I had done some research, and that there were 7.5mg and 10mg variants of the Vicodin available, with less acetaminophen, so less risk of that causing a problem. He said he was uncomfortable prescribing those sorts of doses and referred me to a pain management clinic. I called and made an appointment with them, for 2 months later. No big deal I guess, been 8+ years of pain, what's another 2 months. So the appointment is coming up next week. I was hoping I could get some insight into having a successful treatment at this place.

I know about what I need, but don't want to come straight out and ask for it. Some of the things I tried were iffy on the legal side of things. Old pills from past surgeries of mine, higher than prescribed doses, etc. Though I did have permission to use more than 4 5/500's a day, I feel I shouldn't mention this, or should I? I was taking 8/day, and 2 days I took 10. I don't want them to think I'm abusing them, these were just the levels at which I was able to feel some pain relief for once. I also had some 5mg Percocet from a surgery a year ago or so, and was taking 3-4 of those on occasion. I don't know the legality of discussing this on these forums, but these were all prescribed to me, personally, and not purchased on the street or anything shady like that.

Long story short, I want to be completely truthful with this doctor, mainly because I'm an honest person who just wants the help he needs. Not to mention, I feel as if I don't share this information, she'll just put me on something very slightly stronger, and I'll be in the same boat in 2 weeks. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. I understand if anyone is skeptical, but I truly just want to get back to living a normal, happy life, and being able to get through the rest of my college career and start a career and a family eventually. Even tips on how to act around the doctor, things to avoid doing/saying, things that may benefit me by doing/saying them etc. Due to my social anxiety, I a extremely nervous about this whole appointment, and any tips will greatly help me out.

Again sorry for the extremely long story, but I felt I'd get more help/information if I were completely honest and gave as much information as I could off the top of my head. Thanks for reading and I look forward to your replies.

Jim1969
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2009
Total Posts : 2042
   Posted 11/3/2010 4:00 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi and welcome to the Chronic Pain Forum, and sorry that you find a need to be here.

The first thing I would do is sit down and write up some kind of summary of all that you have been through. Try to make it as accurate as possible and go in chronological order. It doesn't have to be an essay. A simple "log" of what you have been diagnosed with, medications given, their effects, etc. Then at the same time you should start a current pain log. Write down your pain levels, date and time, when they change and any relevant info like what you did, ate, medication taken, etc and the effect. This can help you and/or your doctor detect patterns, triggers, etc and allow for better customization to your treatment. (When doing your summary as well as current log be sure to include any vitamins, herbs, and other natural or OTC meds you have tried)

While it is important to be honest, I would avoid talking about taking old pain meds or using medications in any way that was not prescribed by a doctor. I would avoid asking for any pain medication by name but by all means ask any and all questions, talk about your concerns with medications, etc.

As far as your issue with developing a tolerance to pain meds there could be a psychological component to this. I am not saying that there is not a physical issue too or that it is not completely physical only suggesting that you do not totally rule out a psychological complication. What I am talking about is that when you go on a new drug therapy, regardless if it is a new med or a new dose of a med, people tend to get a bit upbeat and hopeful but because of everything they have gone through and are going through skepticism tends to assert or re-assert itself and can sabotage things.

The battle with chronic pain is really an all out war. To "successfully" fight it requires using every weapon in the arsenal. Medication, mind, spirit, and so forth. It is not easy and often times victories have be measured in small wins or even in stalemates.
2 confirmed herniated lumbar discs. Spinal Arthritis. Spinal Stenosis, diabetic peripheral nueropathy.

krw135
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2010
Total Posts : 183
   Posted 11/3/2010 8:21 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi there!
 
Your story really touched me... I feel like we have a lot in common.  I finally gave in and went to a pain management dr about 2 months ago.  I am so glad I did.  While my PCP was great at "trying" to help control my pain... her just was not willing to take it to the next level.  And by that I mean give me anything more then Norco.  The PM doc has put me on Morphine and I still take the norco for breakthru pain.  This has been working out really well so far.  Also an added bonues that you will probably like too is the pain meds help slow down my bowels a little.  woohoo!
Anyways, like you I was very nervous to see a PM doc... but with the great people on this forum they helped calm me down some.  I took all my medical records with me- just so they have the "proof" that I do have Crohns and I have had tons of abdominal surgeries and I was not just some junkie trying to get drugs.  They will make you sign a contract that says you won't take other rx's of pain meds from others docs, use illegal drugs, use others rx's and stuff like that.  If you have to go the er for fluids and pain control that is ok.  honestly, I am very glad i decided to go with a PM, they have a lot more insight on chronic pain the your average PCP does.  I hope it goes well for you!
I am a 29 yo female, Dx with UC in 97, hospital stays monthly, tons of blood transfusion, bowel rest on TPN, prednisone, asacol, sulfa, imuran, VSP
99- multiple failed remicade treatments, more hospital stays
finally in 2001 had enough and had total colectomy (j-pouch) surgery, 1st step was good, then the reversal was not such a breeze, got peritinitis which was awful!!
the rest of 2001-2006 were amazing!
now having problems again- they are thinking Crohns.- have been on Humira with no luck

ReactiveConstellationNE
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 256
   Posted 11/4/2010 12:57 AM (GMT -7)   
I'm going to be very blunt here. I hope it doesn't put me at odds with any forum policies -- mods, let me know and feel free to edit/delete my post if need be. I'm a forum administrator for many sites myself, and totally understand that you've got to do what you've got to do....though I hope I can put this in such a delicate way that it doesn't run afoul of any such policies.

So: here's my simple message to you.

DO NOT TELL YOUR DOCTOR ANYTHING THAT YOU DON'T ABSOLUTELY HAVE TO.

"Being honest" with your doctor is highly overrated. Even the best docs, and the best patients who haven't abused a darn thing in their lives and want nothing except to function and be a productive member of society, take care of their families, etc....couldn't give a rats rear about "getting high".....run into trouble with the current political environment, and the pressures that doctors are under these days. Financial and peer pressures chief among them.

Remember, docs sell compassion but for even the best of them, this is their JOB. They have their own families to think about, and their own massive school debts, staggering costs to run even a small medical office, etc.....they'd like to help you, but they have limited time and limited patience for even the slightest perception of you being a "problem patient" in any way, shape or form.

So.....I don't see what either you or the doctor gains from you getting into detail about how many "extra" pills you took on certain days, even with your doctor's say-so. Your doctor may have said that, but he also may feel nervous admitting that to the pain doctors. These words will bring you nothing but trouble....the word "extra" or anything similar is like literally wearing a big red flag on your forehead.

In private, docs know that we do what we have to do to cope with the horrors of our illnesses, and that sometimes entails following the spirit of a prescription or doctor's order rather than necessarily the exact letter. We each find ourselves facing those decisions on a daily basis, and the vast majority of us do our best to do right by all concerned, to take proper care of ourselves and do nothing wrong. But once you are the sort of person who goes around talking about every such detail during doctor's appointments, we become "problem patients."

You can summarize the information that the pain clinic doc(s) will really use down to this: "the current prescription is not even close to enough, particularly on the bad days.

I've been in your shoes, though you're many years behind me on the curve it sounds like. It's easy to be tempted to obsess over every word that you could say to a perfectly compassionate, selfless doctor with a heart of gold in order to get the closest possible thing to the full help you need and deserve. But after a few years of over-sharing with your doctors, giving them information that either confused them, they simply ignored, or was downright counterproductive.....you learn to keep it as dead simple as possible.

They will ask questions if they really want to know things. Give them the absolute SHORTEST possible monologue updating them on your history and current situation, which even for an insanely complicated case can usually be stripped down to a few sentences or paragraphs at most. The barest possible minimum, be brutal in your self-editing. You'll be glad you did.

It's easy to second-guess yourself after a relatively successful appointment, thinking maybe you could have gotten more help, stronger pain meds, mentioned something you left out....but usually, with the tiny amount of time they are really willing to dedicate to your care.....your doctor wouldn't even remember most of that stuff five minutes after you left the office. They're looking for the headlines and the low-hanging fruit of things that they can help with, without giving out a single "abusable" or otherwise politically unattractive medication that they don't have to, or in a dose higher than they absolutely have to.

Focus on the important things in your life that your pain is robbing you of....the ability to get exercise, to keep a decent home, to take care of people you love, to be productive at work (or work at all), to have a tolerable quality of life in general. Talk about how much the pain meds helped after the many years you suffered without them not realizing how much they would help.....it helps show that even in pain, your mind wasn't "focused on drugs."

Most clinics will do everything they can to discourage you from using pain meds at all because in the long run, there are issues with sustainability. If you never get better, or at least not better enough to not need help with the pain.....eventually the opiates will become a problem unto themselves, because your need will exceed the doses any doctor you can find will prescribe. I've been there. Theoretically I could have safely escalated to considerably higher doses, but no doctor I have found was willing to be responsible for that or to take the scrutiny from the pharmacists, the DEA, their peers, office staff, etc.

So, express interest right away in cutting-edge methods for managing opiate tolerance. Express an interest in Low Dose Naltrexone, which actually uses a fine-tuned dose of opiate antagonist ("blocker") to convince your own system to make more of its natural endorphins/endomorphins/enkephalins which not only work as well or better than exogenous opioids for pain....they also can have the benefit of modulating the immune system to reduce symptoms of a vast range of diseases. There is also *Ultra* Low Dose Naltrexone (ULDN), which employs microgram doses of antagonist rather than the 1-5mg of LDN, and can be administered alongside an opiate agonist painkiller medication to help prevent or even reverse tolerance, make the opiate last longer, as well as reduce side effects like constipation.

I myself currently use 100-500mcg (micrograms) of Naltrexone per day, diluting 50mg tablets in large bottles of water under my doctor's direction, to keep my tolerance far lower than it was years ago without the benefit of ULDN. It's not perfect, and I wish that I had started using ULDN from the first day when I went back on opiates rather than waiting 6+ months to start, when my tolerance was already back up to 60mg+ of morphine (or equivalent) per day.

Expressing this interest in ULDN and perhaps down the road, LDN alone, has helped my doctor recognize that I really don't care about the opiates themselves or getting as much of them as I can; I'd be much happier to preserve my "naive" tolerance and to be free of dependency entirely, to be able to start and stop taking opiates at will. Dependency really is a big issue, and it can make your burden quite a bit worse than just with the pain alone.

There are other avenues of managing tolerance that you should look into either way, but you may also want to mention to your new pain doctor as things you're interested in. An emphasis on some kind of long-term plan other than just "more and more of the same" is also very important for helping your doctor feel confident in you as a "good patient."

Even if your new doc isn't interested in any of these things, such as NDMA Antagonists (dextromethorphan, the main ingredient in OTC cough medication, is one of these and can prevent/reverse opiate tolerance; magnesium is also a little-known NDMA Antagonist. Low levels of magnesium have been implicated in people's tolerance to opiates rising faster than in other people with normal Mg levels), do look into them on your own. The time to start using them is now, while your tolerance is still quite close to zero.

Your brain will become more and more prone to rapidly forming a heavy tolerance, the longer you use opiates even if you never abuse them. Your neurons will attempt to compensate by amping up their activity levels, boosting the pain "signal" and also making it harder to sleep, among other things. This can make you prone to being more anxious or just feeling things more intensely in general. The sooner you add other tools to your arsenal that will prevent these changes in your neurons from ever happening, the better of you will be. If you can find docs that will help, so much the better, but you can do many of these things on your own if need be.

Good luck, keep us updated! Feel free to ask further questions, I'll try to answer them as best I can and I know the whole community is behind you on this as well. You deserve better, and hopefully you are on your way to finding it. Just remember not to over-share! Don't say a single thing or add any details that aren't absolutely necessary! Odds are the doctor will have decided what they are and are not willing to prescribe for you before you even walk in the door. Unfortunately it's like religion with them.....they read a bunch of poorly developed pain science in their medical textbooks, and to them it's like the Holy Word. Almost no amount of real world experience will convince them otherwise, and few have much of that to begin with. Alas.

Exit I did edit one small word out due to the age of our readers we have to watch it. Great post.

Post Edited By Moderator (straydog) : 11/4/2010 2:00:31 PM (GMT-6)


ReactiveConstellationNE
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 256
   Posted 11/4/2010 12:58 AM (GMT -7)   
....and you thought that your original post was long and drawn out, eh? ;-)

Don't worry, it's par for the course with people in our position. We have a lot on our plates, our minds, and our hearts!
Conditions: Reactive Arthritis (AKA Reiter Syndrome), Crohn's Disease, Chronic Pelvic Inflammatory Syndrome, Sacroiliitis, Costochondritis, As Yet Unknown MS-Like Relapsing/Remitting Neuropathy, and a partridge in a pear tree.

Medications: Currently not that many are taken daily, but there are many at my disposal for part-time use. Low dose pain medication, after years at high doses. Working on innovative ways of taking lesser-known pharmaceuticals and non-prescription supplements to maximum benefit.

straydog
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2003
Total Posts : 11525
   Posted 11/4/2010 1:58 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi Diluted and I too would like to welcome you to Healing Well's chronic pain forum. I am sorry that you have to be here, but very glad that you have found the forum. I can relate to many things you speak of dealing with UC. I have crohns disease and a few years later had the dx of UC tacked on too, so I do understand what you are talking about. I would not wish either disease on my worst enemy either, I don't care how much I may dislike someone, I would not want then to deal with either.

Jim and Exit both gave you the very best opinions on how to handle this upcoming appt so I have nothing further to offer up or add. Only thing, is never ask for a specific medication and forget about adding you took this or that because it was for something left over from another day. That will get you booted quicker than anything. Having a list of what has been taken in the past and how its worked is the quickest and best way for the dr to see where you have been before and helps avoid getting put back on something you have already tried that didn't work. I have always asked the dr what they can do to help me get the pain down enough to function and have some quality life. No matter what any of us is stricken with, we are always entitled to quality life no matter what. Your biggest obstacle is your age and many drs will not rx anything including PM drs because of you being so young. Their theory is if they start you are strong pain medications now you will become tolerant to them and end up with nothing else to give. Unfortunately, pain does not have an age limit, it strikes at any age. Recent studies show we do not become addicted to our meds we build up tolerances. This is the only problem you may run into with this PM dr, so don't be surprised if this happens. If it does, then try another PM dr that is all you can do.

Again, welcome aboard and please let us know how the appt goes.
Moderator Chronic Pain Forum

ReactiveConstellationNE
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 256
   Posted 11/4/2010 6:28 PM (GMT -7)   
Straydog: thanks for the edit. I obviously got more than a little passionate there, pushed the limit with some of my phrasing and all the detail, tried to give every last bit of advice I could on the subject.

BTW, good forum mods are rare gems. HealingWell is very fortunate to have you--as are all of us who come here. :-)

I wasn't much older than Diluted when my own problems started. So I can sympathize with the age issues, though I didn't really start taking the more serious pain meds (I spent almost three years without them just trying to cope with the pain on my own) until after my wife and I got married and started having kids....I was/am trying to function better for them, which at least some of my docs fortunately understand. Just trying to get a decent quality of life without all those other reasons can be a difficult sell to many docs, unfortunately.
Conditions: Reactive Arthritis (AKA Reiter Syndrome), Crohn's Disease, Chronic Pelvic Inflammatory Syndrome, Sacroiliitis, Costochondritis, As Yet Unknown MS-Like Relapsing/Remitting Neuropathy, and a partridge in a pear tree.

Medications: Currently not that many are taken daily, but there are many at my disposal for part-time use. Low dose pain medication, after years at high doses. Working on innovative ways of taking lesser-known pharmaceuticals and non-prescription supplements to maximum benefit.

Mrs. Dani
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2009
Total Posts : 2787
   Posted 11/5/2010 8:32 AM (GMT -7)   

 

   Dear Exitwound,

   Please see / read

~~> http://www.healingwell.com/community/default.aspx?f=16&m=1946802

Thank you,

 Dani Henson



TWO roads diverged in a yellow wood
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood

Chronic Pain Moderator
Mail

ReactiveConstellationNE
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 256
   Posted 11/6/2010 9:38 PM (GMT -7)   
Done. Thanks!
Conditions: Reactive Arthritis (AKA Reiter Syndrome), Crohn's Disease, Chronic Pelvic Inflammatory Syndrome, Sacroiliitis, Costochondritis, As Yet Unknown MS-Like Relapsing/Remitting Neuropathy, and a partridge in a pear tree.

Medications: Currently not that many are taken daily, but there are many at my disposal for part-time use. Low dose pain medication, after years at high doses. Working on innovative ways of taking lesser-known pharmaceuticals and non-prescription supplements to maximum benefit.

spinal soldier
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2009
Total Posts : 628
   Posted 11/12/2010 10:43 PM (GMT -7)   
with the low dose of opiate your using per day this pain clinic may think is so low they may try to talk you into more without you asking.
L4,L5,S1 bilateral Laminectomies, Foraminotomies 2002
L4-S1 PLIF with instumentation 2008,

current Rx: morphine sulfate ER 10OMg q8 , roxicodone 30-60mg prn,vistaril50mg prn nausea, Lyrica 150mg 2x,Adderall 20mgs 1x A.M. 10mg PM prn, Soma 350 mg 3X, Relafen 1000mg 1x, alprazolam o.5 mg, Supplements: CO-Q10 100mg, Vitamin D 2000IU, Fish-Oil1000mg EFA, B-Complex50 3x/day, GABA 750mg,

ReactiveConstellationNE
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 256
   Posted 11/13/2010 6:37 PM (GMT -7)   
spinal soldier said...
with the low dose of opiate your using per day this pain clinic may think is so low they may try to talk you into more without you asking.
\

Precisely why my (admittedly verbose, when first posted above in detail) advice boils down to "be minimalist" in what you say to your pain managing doctor whether that's at a clinic, one of your specialists, or your primary physician. Particularly if the first time you meet them. A first impression can be very important. That's not to say you want to artificially look better than you are....live the truth of what you're going through, but don't offer up any details or information that aren't absolutely necessary. What's necessary is often much less than we think....and this goes for me most of all. I often find myself giving a lot of detail at doctor's appointments that end up not even being noted or remembered by anyone at the next visit and which may have actually gotten in the way of me making the most of the current one.

spinal soldier
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2009
Total Posts : 628
   Posted 11/14/2010 8:43 PM (GMT -7)   
i disagree with exitwound respectively; i believe you should be honest/hounorable and speak to them like a real person.
L4,L5,S1 bilateral Laminectomies, Foraminotomies 2002
L4-S1 PLIF with instumentation 2008,

current Rx: morphine sulfate ER 10OMg q8 , roxicodone 30-60mg prn,vistaril50mg prn nausea, Lyrica 150mg 2x,Adderall 20mgs 1x A.M. 10mg PM prn, Soma 350 mg 3X, Relafen 1000mg 1x, alprazolam o.5 mg, Supplements: CO-Q10 100mg, Vitamin D 2000IU, Fish-Oil1000mg EFA, B-Complex50 3x/day, GABA 750mg,

ReactiveConstellationNE
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 256
   Posted 11/16/2010 4:20 AM (GMT -7)   
spinal soldier said...
i disagree with exitwound respectively; i believe you should be honest/hounorable and speak to them like a real person.


Well, really, I agree....the last thing I'm trying to suggest is that the original poster or anyone else be dishonest or dishonorable in their dealings with their doctors. Honor is a word and an ideal that I take very seriously, that I consider a vital part of living a good and worthwhile life. I just think that when dealing with the average doctor that many of us are forced to accept because we don't have any better alternative at the present time for whatever role they're playing in our health care....it's wise to be minimalist because in my experience, it's all too easy to get in one's own way by expecting too much from the doctor.

If I could go back 10 years when this all started for me, and give myself one piece of advice about dealing with doctors, it would be to set my expectations a bit lower and to focus on the headlines of what the doc needs to know as well as what you need from them because even the "good" docs rarely have the time or desire to pay attention beyond the "headlines" anyway.

In a perfect world "speaking to them like a real person" would be the right approach, but I've learned the hard way that dealing with doctors is a minefield and the smaller your "footprint," the better. Minimalist doesn't have to be dishonest, it's just cautious and efficient. If you asked a really candid and really great doc for their advice (as I have a few times when I've been lucky enough to know one), it often ends up boiling down to the same thing. Few people are as cynical about dealing with doctors as they often are.

straydog
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2003
Total Posts : 11525
   Posted 11/16/2010 1:27 PM (GMT -7)   
I have to add something here about the drs thing. I was talking with my PM dr last month when I was there for a pump refill. We were talking about some of my experiences with my prior PM dr and I told her that I was upset with myself for letting my health get totally out control because I relied on what that dr told me and unfortunately I believed him. I am not someone that believes much of what any dr says and I am always skeptical of them. She looked me straight in the eye and told me that I should not believe everything a dr tells me and I should always be skeptical of them, lol. I was quite surprised at her sharing that with me.

I do not think Exit was telling Diluted to be dishonest one bit with this new dr. He simply stated it may be best not to offer up that he had taken some pain meds he had left over from something else. Granted it may not be the thing to do taking something but most have done it in the past. We all know how paranoid PM drs are these days, so I agreed and said I simply would leave that part out.

Regardless I think we need to let this thread go, Diluted has not been back to the forum since the initial post so lets let this thread slip away to to the cyberworld.
Moderator Chronic Pain Forum
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