Trigger point injections

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cogito
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Date Joined Oct 2010
Total Posts : 785
   Posted 10/24/2011 4:04 PM (GMT -6)   
I just came back from getting some trigger point injections in my back... left trapezius and rhomboid.

I immediately felt relief in the rhomboid (one place normally stabs and burns). The other injections didn't do anything...at least so far. My left trap is usually in severe spasm due to the scoliosis and I've not felt any change. It also didn't do anything for my burning arm pain, but I didn't expect it to.

When I got home, I had something to eat, which meant leaning forward over the table. While eating, the typical pain in my rhomboid that stabs and burns returned to its painful state, but quickly got better. So, at least at this point, a major improvement with that one painful spot, but so far, no where else. Maybe the doctor only hit one spot dead on?

I'm wondering whether others have experienced major and/or long term relief from trigger point injections.
C4-T4 Scoliosis (disk degeneration, stenosis, narrowed neuroforamen, bone spurs), RT hip and SI joint damage from car accident. Also, pectus excavatum, supraventricular tacycardia and mitral valve prolapse syndrome.
Current meds: Ultram ER 300mg daily, breakthrough - hydrocodone 10-15mg, or oxycodone 5-7.5mg. .25-.5mg ativan as needed for sleep, Verapamil 240mg SR (for tachycardia). [/gray

Monty's Mom
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Date Joined Aug 2010
Total Posts : 664
   Posted 10/24/2011 5:38 PM (GMT -6)   
Cogito,
I get short term pain relief from trigger point injections in my SI joints, and in hip muscles and groin muscles, but forgive me I can't remember their names right now. Mine don't last longer than three to four weeks at most.

I hope that you get more relief from yours, and that what you get lasts a while. I get mine every 2 months.

Mindy
The worst sin towards our fellow creatures is not to hate them, but to be indifferent to them. That's the essence of inhumanity. George Bernard Shaw
Pelvic adhesive disease, IBS, SI pain, arthritis, kidney stones, depression, 10 pelvic surgeries for pain, ovarian cysts, adhesions, endometriosis, adenomyosis, and possible ovarian remnant syndrome. Unexpectedly growing ovary #3 on right side.

Chutz
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2005
Total Posts : 9090
   Posted 10/25/2011 1:08 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi~

I had injections 3 times in the lower spine area. First one did nothing, second one didn't do much but as I was walking out to the car it's a good thing I had my husband's arm. My left knee collapsed and my leg went with it. They really mean it when they require you to have a driver. The 3rd set of injections didn't do much more and I had hit my limit so had to quit.

I seem to recall them telling me that it might even get a bit worse before it gets better so give it a few days and hopefully you'll find more pain relief.

Love the good news part!
Chutz
Moderator on the Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain forums
~*~*~*~*~*~*~
Fibromyalgia, Insulin Dependent Diabetes. Ulcerative Colitis, Rare form of Dermatitis, Collapsed Disk, Osteoarthritis in Neck/Hands/and slowly meandering around other places....and other maladies as discovered.
~~~~~
It's kind of fun to do the impossible.
Walt Disney

bsjaguar
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2009
Total Posts : 974
   Posted 10/25/2011 6:23 AM (GMT -6)   
I've gotten trigger point injections before by my PCP in her office. I used to get severe muscle spasms in the sides of my back that just wouldn't let loose and hurt like heck. I'd actually feel around until I found the really sore spot then I'd mark myself with a pen before heading to the doctors office. This would save alot of time finding the correct spot for the doctor to inject the cortizone. I've had alot of success with these injections if they hit the right spot but sometimes finding that spot can be hard.

A trigger point injection doesn't require anesthesia. It is just a quick cortizone shot into a sore area or muscle.
---Jag---


DDD, osteoarthritis, facet syndrome, fusion surgeries C-5/7 & L-4/5 both in 2006, torn meniscus surgeries left knee 2000 & 2002, buldging disc L-2/3 & L-3/4, fibromyalgia, polymyalgia rheumatica

cogito
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2010
Total Posts : 785
   Posted 10/25/2011 9:42 AM (GMT -6)   
So far, so good with one spot.

A location between my shoulder blade and spine, around the size of a dollar coin would come to feel like a burning spear was jabbed into it. That one was easy to locate and the doctor injected it dead on. So far, the pain there is gone (or at least not as persistent).

Much of the remainder of the pain continues and last night was atypically worse. I laid on an ice pack for a half an hour and that helped quite a bit.

It is much harder to direct the injection for the rest of the upper back pain for it spans pretty much the whole left trapezius. Should I, next time, have the doctor just put a bunch of injections in through the whole muscle?
C4-T4 Scoliosis (disk degeneration, stenosis, narrowed neuroforamen, bone spurs), RT hip and SI joint damage from car accident. Also, pectus excavatum, supraventricular tacycardia and mitral valve prolapse syndrome.
Current meds: Ultram ER 300mg daily, breakthrough - hydrocodone 10-15mg, or oxycodone 5-7.5mg. .25-.5mg ativan as needed for sleep, Verapamil 240mg SR (for tachycardia). [/gray

swaye
New Member


Date Joined Oct 2011
Total Posts : 17
   Posted 10/25/2011 12:24 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Cogito - I am new to the forum but saw your post and thought I would reply.

I have been getting trigger point injections for the last 6 months in the upper and lower back. I started with 6 rounds of prolotherapy to help with lower back and SI joint pain. The injections irritate the area forcing the body to try to heal itself. They can get rather expensive and I had minimal improvement. At the same time I was starting to have upper back muscular pain and was diagnoised with fibro by a pain management doctor. She started doing trigger point injections with lidocaine and an anti-irritant solution to help resolve them. Most doctors don't use cortisone for trigger point injections or else it would break down the muscle tissue. I am told that trigger points need to be injected sometimes up to 10 times before the pain/trigger point actual resolves itself. They never go away but they can go dormate. For some people, they need to stop doing whatever it is that caused the trigger point in the first place. For me, it was using my laptop on the couch and it started with hand pain that eventually moved up in to my back. I have now resolved the hand pain by setting up an ergonomic workspace. I still struggle with the upper trap pain probably because of stress and other things that continue to irritate that area. I have also been seeing an acupuncture MD who does dry needling and I have been getting that done in-between the trigger point injections. It is very painful and not easy to find qualified people who know how to do this. Acupuncture needles are inserted in the knots and the needle is moved around until the muscle stops twitching. I do have to say after at least 10+ treatments between the two that I am getting much better although I am not quite there yet.

My trigger point pain is very specific. I can go over my body and push on each individual one that causes pain or is a knot. To help the doctor, I usually make a small 'X' with a pen on each one so when I go to the appointment they know exactly where to inject. Just a helpful suggestion. If anyone has questions on prolo or trigger point injections let me know. I am a long time pain patient and have tried almost all that is medically or alternatively available out there.
Successful L4/L5 laminectomy 2000. Tore L5/S1 in 2007 after accident. Chronic nerve pain which I have been trying to solve for 4 years. Recently diagnoised with fibro due to upper back pain with tender trigger points. Tried every type of doctor and every type of treatment available with minimal success.

cogito
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2010
Total Posts : 785
   Posted 10/25/2011 12:57 PM (GMT -6)   
I really like the idea of marking the pain spots prior to going in to see the doctor.

The rhomboid location still is doing well today. But I'll be more prepared for where to get the trap injections next time.

Thanks for all the input.
C4-T4 Scoliosis (disk degeneration, stenosis, narrowed neuroforamen, bone spurs), RT hip and SI joint damage from car accident. Also, pectus excavatum, supraventricular tacycardia and mitral valve prolapse syndrome.
Current meds: Ultram ER 300mg daily, breakthrough - hydrocodone 10-15mg, or oxycodone 5-7.5mg. .25-.5mg ativan as needed for sleep, Verapamil 240mg SR (for tachycardia). [/gray

cogito
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2010
Total Posts : 785
   Posted 10/27/2011 9:47 AM (GMT -6)   
It is now 3 days since I've had injections and I'm pleased. Overall, the pain has been reduced.

One injection worked right away, the others (in the tense trapezius) may have done less, but I've not needed any BT meds since the injection and thus far, just ice and NSAIDs have taken care of the pain.
Situations that typically lead to pain around 5-7 have been brought down to 2-4.

Today, though, is going to be a big test as it is rainy outside and I have taken care of some chores so that I can devote the day to writing...nothing (hopefully) to distract me for the next 7hrs, until my wife returns from work.
C4-T4 Scoliosis (disk degeneration, stenosis, narrowed neuroforamen, bone spurs), RT hip and SI joint damage from car accident. Also, pectus excavatum, supraventricular tacycardia and mitral valve prolapse syndrome.
Current meds: Ultram ER 300mg daily, breakthrough - hydrocodone 10-15mg, or oxycodone 5-7.5mg. .25-.5mg ativan as needed for sleep, Verapamil 240mg SR (for tachycardia). [/gray

dpfan
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2012
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 1/25/2012 11:38 PM (GMT -6)   
I once had so many trigger point injections at once that I couldn't move, felt nauseous and had to call someone to drive me home. After that I could only get 3 or 4 at a time. I have Fibromyalgia and get many trigger point spots. I have tried the tens unit, biofreeze, icy hot. The only thing I have found to help, besides stretching in a pool, is Voltaren Gel. I use Donna Finando's book Trigger Point Self-Care Manual to help me locate the trigger point according to the site of pain. Voltaren gel is a prescription for joint inflammation but I rubbed it onto the trigger point spots and I find relief, it might take several times of rubbing it on but have not had to use it more than 2 days before the pain goes away. I use it when I get trigger point pain on my head, knees, hips, shoulders, neck, wrist, even for pain with my thumb or the outside of my hand.
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