Dihydrocodeine

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Hibee
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 6993
   Posted 10/8/2012 6:36 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi All

I have just been prescribed by the pain clinic the extended release Dihydrocodeine 60mg 2 in the morning and two at bedtime. I was taking Co Codomol 30/500 8 a day but they were not helping with my back pain, The specialist nurse wanted to change me to Duloxetine but couldn't as it interacted with the escitalopram I take.

Does any one have experience with this medication and did it work well for pain relief?

Hibee
I try not to worry about the future -- so I take each day just one anxiety attack at a time.

ANXIETY & PANIC FORUM MODERATOR

Diagnosed with:- Asperger's Syndrome, dyslexia, gad, sad, ocd, depression, reactive arthritis and Scheuermann's Disease (Adult)

Snowbunny21
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Date Joined Jan 2010
Total Posts : 3557
   Posted 10/8/2012 8:26 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi Hibee...

I haven't heard of this particular medication but it seems to be used a lot in it's other names as a cough medication.

It says it's "cousin" meds are Hydrocodone or Oxycodone..and seems to be a step up from your Co-Codamol.

I hope it works well for you...
SB (Snowbunny) and the pup that snores (my yellow lab:))

3, two-level, cervical fusions over the past 11 years. The last one was anterior and posterior with lots of fun titanium!
Still have active herniations along with knee problems and another Morton's neuroma in left foot.
I try to find joy in each day even with chronic pain:)

Matt-man&little-boy
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2012
Total Posts : 790
   Posted 10/8/2012 9:07 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi hibee, I also have never heard of this medication and had to look it up, so I now know its a C II, and is supposed to be 100 times more potent than codeine. What I found also says that this medication was developed over 100 years ago, but it didn't say why it has such limited use ( it must be pretty limited when CP people haven't heard of it, especially if SB hasn't heard of it lol).

Let us know how it works, good luck, and take care.
Matt
dx: just had L3-4 XLIF and ILIF, gotta see what happens. Disc bulge in T12-L1, ddd through rest of lumbar region. Gastric Bypass 2003, bleeding ulcer in pouch 2005, full small bowel obstruction 2011. Left shoulder has Bursitis, tendonitus, separated bicep muscle (I was told all the muscles look like string cheese lol, or a frayed rope), and arthritis of the Glenoid and humeral head.

Snowbunny21
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Date Joined Jan 2010
Total Posts : 3557
   Posted 10/8/2012 9:13 AM (GMT -6)   
LOL Matt...I think it's more because it's not used in the US very much at all and that's why a lot of us don't know the name..

And I love to learn:)

Since codeine itself is such a weak medication...it's not too difficult to have medications that are stronger...

I think we read the same information...and this medication is used for moderate to severe pain...

So I truly hope it works well for Hibee..
SB (Snowbunny) and the pup that snores (my yellow lab:))

3, two-level, cervical fusions over the past 11 years. The last one was anterior and posterior with lots of fun titanium!
Still have active herniations along with knee problems and another Morton's neuroma in left foot.
I try to find joy in each day even with chronic pain:)

ReactiveConstellationNE
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 256
   Posted 10/8/2012 3:23 PM (GMT -6)   
DHC is far superior to codeine, as it is converted to dihydromorphine (itself far superior to the morphine that codeine is converted to) and doesn't have the metabolic conversion limit of about 400mg/day that your body is able to make use of codeine before the enzymes run out and it can't make any more morphine for a while.

You are much better off with dihydrocodeine than with codeine, IMHO.
Conditions: Reactive Arthritis (AKA Reiter Syndrome), Severe Spinal Degeneration (Ankylosing Spondylitis, Pars Defect, Neural Foraminal Stenosis, 6mm gap@L5-S1, disc issues, etc), Chronic Pelvic Inflammatory Syndrome, Sacroiliitis, Costochondritis, Epididymitis, Prostatitis, Multiple Organ Issues, Unknown MS-Like Neuropathy, digestive issues, and a partridge in a pear tree.

Fusiongirl
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Date Joined Apr 2012
Total Posts : 608
   Posted 10/8/2012 3:24 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi there

Dihydrocodeine is used commonly in the UK, it is considered one of the weak opioids, not as strong as tramadol. I think the dose is fairly strong so should give a decent Result. Of course some pain meds work better for some than others. All I can say is if you don't get the level of pain relief you require make sure you return to the pain clinic and ask to try something else.

Strangely enough although I have heard of duloxetine being used for pain here on HW, in the UK it is used for depression and I have seldom heard of it being used for pain. However that may because I am not up to date, maybe it is one of these dual purpose meds.

Hope you have a good result with the dihydrocodeine.

Take care

Jane

Hibee
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 6993
   Posted 10/9/2012 7:28 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi

Thanks for all the responses to my post. I have done a bit of research myself now since posting yesterday and from what I can gather Dihydrocodeine is 2 x stronger than Codeine but not quite as strong as Morphine and used to treat moderate to severe pain.

It is not used very often now as doctors prefer to prescribe Tramadol as Dihydrocodeine is a highly sought after street drug due to its effects. It is mostly used by the medical profession to give to addicts who are withdrawing from Heroin.

Hi Jane I also live in the UK and was told by the pain clinic that Duloxetine is being used a lot more to treat chronic pain and is becoming the preferred option rather than opioids. The reason I could not go for that option was that it interacts with the Escitalopram that I take for depression/anxiety.

I will keep you posted on how things go with this med fingers crossed it will help reduce pain levels so I can focus more on my mindfulness.

Hibee
I try not to worry about the future -- so I take each day just one anxiety attack at a time.

ANXIETY & PANIC FORUM MODERATOR

Diagnosed with:- Asperger's Syndrome, dyslexia, gad, sad, ocd, depression, reactive arthritis and Scheuermann's Disease (Adult)

Fusiongirl
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2012
Total Posts : 608
   Posted 10/9/2012 7:51 AM (GMT -6)   
Hibee

Isn't it funny that we can tell where one another is from by the meds prescribed.

It's just come back to me that I was prescribed duloxetine for depression a few years back and I was told that it 'may' help with your pain. It just didn't agree with me at all and I was subsequently prescribed escitalopram. Now that has helped the depression but has made the tiredness worse. I thought it would improve with time. I blame the escitalopram but the fatigue could be down to multiple surgeries over a short time I guess. Have you had good results with the escitalopram, do you have any side effects with it.

Hope you have good results with the dihydrocodeine, I know it has been successful in treating many people. I guess you are in England as here in the north we don't seem to have many specialist nurses, I live near a largish city and I haven't heard of any up here.

Take care

Jane

Hibee
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 6993
   Posted 10/9/2012 8:56 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi Jane

I live in Edinburgh and have been lucky with the medical profession as managed to get a really good GP. I have been on a number of AD and have found escitalopram to be the best but yes I also struggle with fatigue but not sure if that is down to a side effect ore due to anxiety and chronic pain? I also take Pregabalin which has helped loads with the anxiety and it is also supposed to help with pain lol.

Hibee
I try not to worry about the future -- so I take each day just one anxiety attack at a time.

ANXIETY & PANIC FORUM MODERATOR

Diagnosed with:- Asperger's Syndrome, dyslexia, gad, sad, ocd, depression, reactive arthritis and Scheuermann's Disease (Adult)

Fusiongirl
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2012
Total Posts : 608
   Posted 10/9/2012 5:54 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Hibee

I live in Aberdeen, you are the first Scot I have met on here! I too have found the escitalopram to be a very good med, it took a while to find it but it has helped me enormously. I certainly have never had a nurse practitioner, I was aware of their existence but have never come across one. I suppose Edinburgh Royal is a big hospital, but so is Aberdeen Royal, I guess it just depends on your health board.

I too have been very lucky, I have a great GP and access to many as we have the largest surgery in Scotland, I think there are about eighteen doctors, some part time though. Gives you plenty of choice!!

Nice to meet you

Jane

getting_there
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2012
Total Posts : 34
   Posted 12/20/2012 6:34 PM (GMT -6)   
I'm been working with DHC now for a while and it made a noticeable difference from the codeine I was one before it but not to the point where I can function repetitively - I'm currently trying Fentanyl patches

Mine aren't extended release though, I hope they give you some relief they're basically the logical step up from Codeine - one word of warning they're a lot more constipating than Codeine so just monitor that the first few days I actually have to take a laxative to help with it

take care

meunier
New Member


Date Joined Mar 2014
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 3/7/2014 5:54 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi. I'm a new member here from the UK. I have a rather sorry cervical spine with severe foraminal stenosis scattered about. I had a bad patch about a year and a half ago ... but it has only just returned after a long period being asymptomatic. Three weeks ago I awoke with the proverbial headache - the pressure in the back of the head one. It has been rather constant since I fear. I have been given Dihydrocodeine (a 7 day supply, 30 mg, 4 x per day) to take to relieve the pain in the relevant foraminal nerve juncture and thereby hoping to eliminate the pressure in the brain -- and -- with any luck --- at the same time teach my body how it might like to keep that procedure on a more even keel for a bit. (Is this how it works??? I would be grateful to hear from anyone who has had practical experience in this regard.) I am a bit wary of taking a narcotic I must say ... but needs must I suppose.

One other question ... Does/can the cervical spine generated pressure/tension headache (which I am a relative newcomer to) alter your sleeping habits? Since the on-set of this pressure headache (for lack of a better phrase) I seem to wake up three and a half hours after going to sleep. (I don't have any problem falling asleep ... (at least that I'm aware of) ... It's staying to sleep I now seem to struggle with.) When I wake up - and I don't know if it is only my imagination - I always seem to have an impression that I'm feeling something behind my left eye. But then I never feel that again. Most strange. Does the cervical pressure in/on your head alter your sleeping clock? The doctor I spoke with said we all wake up in the middle of the night ... we just usually don't remember - and fall immediately back to sleep until we fully come to in a more conscious sense. Does this condition separate those units? Most disturbing if it does.

Much thanks for your kind advice. It is/will be truly appreciated. Bless you.
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