Anyone here with Psuedomonis in the sinuses?

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JEllen246
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Date Joined Mar 2017
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 3/25/2017 7:48 AM (GMT -6)   
Many years of infections. Diagnosed w this horrible bug a few years back. Considering surgery. Curious about living w this on a daily basis at home and at work. Thanks.

(Seashell)
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Date Joined Dec 2012
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   Posted 3/25/2017 8:25 AM (GMT -6)   
JEllen:
Your post brought back memories of my horror with a virulent strain of MRSA that colonized in my sinuses. It was a nightmare.

I picked up the strain of MRSA working in a hospital and doing wound care on an elderly woman with venous stasis ulcers with cultured MRSA infection. The first inkling was a pimple-like sore that appeared on my face. The infection quickly took hold in the soft tissues of my face, resulting in a dense cellulitis. The next pit-stop was my nasal sinuses.

It took over a year of IV vancomyocin and regular anti-bacterial solution lavage of my nasal sinuses to clear the infection. The infection would ease, only to later find that residual bacteria would once again flourish and I would suffer through another acute flare.

The sinuses are a warm, moist and inviting home for pseudomonis - just as it was for the strain of MRSA that made a home in my nasal passageways.

The concern, always, is that the sinuses are in close proximity to the brain and to the meninges.

I would think that you would benefit from a pairing of both an infectious disease physician and ear-nose-and-through (ENT) physician. Keep a watchful eye on your situation and keep on the defensive. Sinus based bacterial and fungal infections can be difficult to reign in.
- K -
Pituitary failure, wide-spread endocrine dysfunction
Addison's disease
Mixed connective tissue disorder
Extensive intestinal perforation with sepsis, permanent ileostomy
Avascular necrosis of both hips and jaw
Receiving Palliative Care (care and comfort)

Alcie
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Date Joined Oct 2009
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   Posted 3/25/2017 2:07 PM (GMT -6)   
Having had the surgery which only made my recurrent infections worse, I would recommend trying everything else first.

Pseudomonas isn't the worst thing to get rid of, unless it's resistant.

rocckyd
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   Posted 3/25/2017 2:31 PM (GMT -6)   
I've had pseudomonas pneumonia 2x, both requiring hospital transfers, and one icu stay.
I'm also immunocompromised, which is why I couldn't fight the bug.

An infectious disease specialist was involved.

I guess my question is why do your Drs think you can't kick this, and who have you seen?
Single mom to my little man 11yrs old
39yrs old. JRA since a kid. Chronic Uveitis, pleurisy, pericarditis, intersticial lung disease, sjorgrens syndrome, Cushing's Syndrome, gastroparisis
Bilateral TMJ replacements due to bone fusion, port-a-cath, g/j feeding tube, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome(my blood fights itself) epilepsy, MCTD, dysphagia(unable to swallow correctly)

JEllen246
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Date Joined Mar 2017
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 3/25/2017 4:01 PM (GMT -6)   
Wow, thx for your replies. Please read all my stuff, I just had some individual questions. So appreciate that you are all here.

Seashell, any problems after the IV drug? My culture says the only ones I can take are Levequin, Cipro or Bactrum. I can't tale the Sulfa drugs. My allergist did IGE immunity testing. All my numbers then were good except for Subclass 3. If you did around on the net, that's the sinuses. I have had chronic sinus infections for many years w loads of antibiotics.

Alcie, curious as to why you feel the surgery made your infections worse? Doc wants to try a treatment after surgery where he puts a gel of Levequin on sinuses weekly. I then would have a nasal nebulizer with liquid Levequin. He said he's had 85% cure rate.


Rocckyd I've had 2 balloon procedures. This Second one was successful in a sense that I am more opened up. I've seen 2 ENTs. This doc is the head ENT at Sinai Hospital and Union Memorial here in Balt. Area. I also have sleep apnea. I have worked out to get tubing every month vs 3 months. I also was thinking of making an appt. with the University of Maryland Infectious Disease docs. I'm a bit freaked out about entering a hospital!

I'm also curious. With this infection, would you use a different face cloth each day? I was using one for about 5 days before changing out, how long does Psudemonis live on a counter or object you touch?

Alcie
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Date Joined Oct 2009
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   Posted 3/25/2017 5:06 PM (GMT -6)   
Doc didn't know why my infections became more frequent after surgery. One factor could have been that my septum wasn't straightened and still blocked the medial sinus on one side. Frankly, I don't think the infections were ever "cured" from day 1, ... for years. I started getting infections after a bad accident in which my nose was broken by the airbag. I got no treatment except antibiotics for the infections for a couple of years.

Then my ENT did the sinus balloon thing and my infections didn't go away but needed antibiotics more often. I finally got rid of the infections when I was hospitalized for an bowel infection which was treated IV.

As far as I can find from reading scientific studies, we get bacterial plaques in the sinuses that are not easily cured. One doctor told me that only the sulfa drugs get to the sinuses well, because there isn't much circulation there. I don't tolerate sulfa in the amount it takes to do the job.

I would think it should be possible to get into the sinuses from inside the nose. I don't know why we don't get antibiotic put in there before going to surgery.

My treatment was several years ago, so maybe newer treatments are available today.

Now I keep my sinuses washed (Neil Med squeeze bottle of saline) if they seem the least bit clogged. That may not work as well if your passages are not opened, but the surgery is h...

JEllen246
New Member


Date Joined Mar 2017
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 3/25/2017 5:29 PM (GMT -6)   
I use Neil Med two times a day. I have a deviated septum too. The gel treatment is new and may be experimental.

JEllen246
New Member


Date Joined Mar 2017
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 3/25/2017 5:32 PM (GMT -6)   
Seashell, what was the antibacterial nasal rinse? Something the doc ordered?

(Seashell)
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Date Joined Dec 2012
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   Posted 3/25/2017 11:47 PM (GMT -6)   
JEllen:
The antibacterial lavage was a physician prescription solution. I do know that we cycled through several antibiotics. There was no one single shot gun approach. As I mentioned, it was a year in the making to get the bacterial count down on a consistent level with IV vancomycin and a PICC line.

I just recall the ordeal as pure he**. I began to experience severe anxiety as a new lesion would appear on my face, signaling that the bacterial count as on the rise.

I used Hibiclens judiciously as a shower and facial wash.

I would encourage you to puchase a stack of facial wash cloths. Use a wash cloth only one time before laundering. Launder your bath towels frequently - I laundered my bath towels every day.

I used only small wash rags for the cleaning of kitchen dishes and cutlery. I did not keep a kitchen sponge that might collect bacteria.

I used paper towels, Bounty Select a Size, abundantly. Single use, throw away. I treated myself as my own isolation patient being very mindful not to re-infect myself.

Limit touching your face and nose. You really have to monitor constantly re-infecting yourself. My greatest source of reinfection was my own self. Touching my nose/face, blowing my nose and then touching my face . . I had to be very mindful not to touch my face and reinfect myself. It is amazing how often in the course of a day our hands drift up to our faces, as if on auto-pilot.

Wash your hands frequently, frequently and thoroughly, thoroughly throughout the day with warm water and soap. Make sure that you point your hands and forearms downward into the sink, making sure that water does not run down your forearm toward your elbow.

Dispose of any Kleenex or facial tissue promptly in a plastic lined trash bag. Empty your trash frequently to the outside bin or dumpster.

I changed my bedding sheets, especially my pillow case, each morning and aired my pillows in a hot dryer each morning.

I would be cautious of surgery. You are opening up a fresh wound bed to the fungus.

Do you have a compromised immune system? I do have known auto-immune disorder and this left me more open to not having a robust immune system that might have more easily attacked the MRSA.
- Karen -
Pituitary failure, wide-spread endocrine dysfunction
Addison's disease
Mixed connective tissue disorder
Extensive intestinal perforation with sepsis, permanent ileostomy
Avascular necrosis of both hips and jaw
Receiving Palliative Care (care and comfort)

JEllen246
New Member


Date Joined Mar 2017
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 3/26/2017 6:42 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi. Is Pseudomonas airborne? How long does it live on an object? I'm in a school till June as a teacher when I retire. What about people who come here to visit? I'm not sharing my situation. My son and his GF come for dinner once a week. They obviously know.

My allergist did IGE immunity testing. All my numbers then were good except for Subclass 3. That was about 4 months ago. She said I did not have an immunity issue. If you did around on the net, subclass 3 of IGG testing relates to the sinuses. I am just sucepticle to sinus infectious I guess. She told me that I should forget about the subclass as no one looks at that. I really think I am going to talk to an infectious disease doc.

Thank you for all your suggestions. I can't find the answers to how long this bacteria lasts on objects on the internet

straydog
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Date Joined Feb 2003
Total Posts : 15006
   Posted 3/26/2017 9:06 AM (GMT -6)   
I am with Karen on this one. My sister battled this for years & about 20 years ago she had surgery. Her description of the surgery was barbaric. She was desperate enough at that time. She did pretty good for many years, however it has returned. Although, surgery was an option once again, she declined. Her drs have reassured her that this surgery has been greatly improved since then. What she did do was find the best infectious disease dr in her area & she is currently under his care. And no, she has never had a compromised immune system.

I would urge you to see an infectious disease dr for this. From what I have read on the net it is everywhere, it can survive in water, plants, one article said it is in the air. The key is determining the strain of the bacteria & finding the antibiotic to treat it.

Take care.
Susie
Moderator in Chronic Pain & Psoriasis Forums

(Seashell)
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Date Joined Dec 2012
Total Posts : 665
   Posted 3/26/2017 9:25 AM (GMT -6)   
If you are not seeing an infectious disease physician, by all means consult and meet with an infectious disease physician before agreeing to surgery.

Purchase Hibiclens (antibacterial soap) and use this when washing your face and in the shower. This should begin to decrease the fungus load.

Keep your hands away from your face. Be mindful of not touching your nose and your eyes during the day - it is second nature that we reach up and touch our scalp, fuss with our hair, touch our nose. Keeping your hands away from your face, nose, and eyes will be more helpful than you may think.

Keep hand sanitizer available. Wash your hands frequently throughtout the day - be thorough, spend at least 1 minute lathering with running soap and water. Be careful not to let water drip down your forearm and elbow after washing your hands - that runs the possibility of bacterial and fungus running down your forearm to the elbow. Grab a paper towel and dry your hands/arms after hand washing.

Wash your pillow cases every day or every other day.

Start using paper towels judiciously. Use them in the kitchen and bathroom. Toss away after a single use. I am a big user of paper towels since my MRSA infection.

Toss away your kitchen sponge and use a small washable kitchen cloth when cleaning dish ware. Wash towels with increased frequency. Fugus and bacteria linger on towels and sponges.

I do not think that your fungal infection is contagious in the sense that you can directly pass it to someone else. You are not inherently contagious. We all have MRSA and fungus and bacteria in your sinuses and intestinal tracts. For whatever reason, fungal inhabitants have over-populated and your body is not able to rally with an effective counter-offensive. Your fungal problem is more a problem with your body's lack of sufficient immune response and less a problem of being contagious.

That I acquired the virulent MRSA was owing more that I was already immunosuppressed. An otherwise health person would not have been as overwhelmed by the exposure as I was.

Bottom Line: Do get a referral to a competent infectious disease physician. Looking into your body's immune response will be essential in clearing this assault.

I can understand your fatigue with an ongoing infection. The MRSA infection was a low period of my life. I would look in the mirror in the morning, frozen in fear and anxiety of finding another lesion on my
face. It was a long year. With the help of a good infectious disease MD, I made it through.

The good news is that once my body was able to assault the MRSA and get the bacterial load down, I was on my way to wellbeing. I have not experienced a recurrence although I know that I have residual MRSA and always will. I am very mindful of supporting my immune system, especially since I am on life-long corticosteroids.

My sense is that you need a physician who can look at the totality of the pseudomonois colonization and your body's immune response. Surgery will not give you a long-term solution until the underlying reason for the colonization is identified.
- Karen -
Pituitary failure, wide-spread endocrine dysfunction
Addison's disease
Mixed connective tissue disorder
Extensive intestinal perforation with sepsis, permanent ileostomy
Avascular necrosis of both hips and jaw
Receiving Palliative Care (care and comfort)

Post Edited ((Seashell)) : 3/26/2017 9:33:16 AM (GMT-6)


JEllen246
New Member


Date Joined Mar 2017
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 3/26/2017 9:53 AM (GMT -6)   
Thank you Susie and Karen,
I actually have Hibiclens here. I will begin using that on my face. I know you can't use it near the eyes though. I am going out today to buy more wash cloths. I have been using Bona Floor cleaner on my floors and just checked. It's not sanitizing. I have someone that cleans my home once a month. I will have her use some vinegar and water. I would love your opinion about visitors in my home. I was thinking that I could just tell them that I just got over a sinus infection and to please wash your hands coming in and when you leave. I will have my son and his girlfriend do that too.

I use one of those scouring pads in my sink and one sponge. I have been putting it in the dishwasher every other day. You guys are giving me more hope. It can be quite the downer. I have not scheduled this surgery but signed the papers. I think I will tell them I am going to wait till I see the infectious disease person at the University. It's a teaching hospital so I will be in good hands.

I am also a true asthmatic and use a cpap machine. I have a "So Clean machine" that cleans my machine daily. I use baby shampoo in the hose once a week. Once I retire in June, I may do it more. I use inhalers twice a day and also use nose sprays. I will not be cleaning the tops with antibacterial wipes rather than just water. I am turning into quite the germaphobe, but all in my favor.

Ellen

(Seashell)
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Date Joined Dec 2012
Total Posts : 665
   Posted 3/26/2017 10:16 AM (GMT -6)   
Ellen:
Sharing that you are asthmatic and using inhalers regularly adds important information. Your inhalers likely have a corticosteroid component. Corticosteorids suppress the immune system.

I have been on corticosteorids for Addison's disease and mixed connective tissue disorder for 25 + years. That is a lot of exposure to corticosteroids. But I have no option. I rely on corticosteorids to survive.

But recognize that corticosterids come with a steep price.

You may want to include an endocrinologist as part of your medical team owing to your long-term relationship with coritcosteorids. Pituitary suppression often accompanies steroid use. Low pituitary hormones play havoc on the body in subtle and less than subtle ways.

Bottom Line: While you may not feel that you are immunosuppressed, you likely are immunosuppressed simply due to the corticosteroids that you depend upon to keep your asthma in check.

Given you long-term history of corticosteroids, your pseudomonis colonization begins to make sense. You are not contagious to other people. The colonization is beyond what your body can mobilize defenses against . . . corticosteorids are likely at the center of the long-standing inability of your body's to keep the pseudomonis in check.

Being aware of keeping your environment clean and your hands/face clean will help you in the fight.

I am purposefully a "minimalist." I keep a clean living space without clutter. I have hard wood flooring instead of extensive carpeting that retains allergens. I have mite-proof cases on my mattress and pillows. I use paper towels judiciously. All in an effort to keep allergens and retained bacteria/fungus to a minimum so that I am healthier. My health is fragile enough as it is.

I think you are on a better pathway already in the few postings on this thread. You have my sincere best wishes,
- Karen -

JEllen246
New Member


Date Joined Mar 2017
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 3/26/2017 10:31 AM (GMT -6)   
Awe, thanks Karen. Yes, been on inhalers twice daily since 1980. As a child always was told I have Allergist Rhinitis. I take Dulera in AM and pulmacort at night and still wake up w a deep wheeze. Once I take Dulera I am fine. I take the pulmacort at night as Dulera keeps me up. I have takes zertec and singular for years. I have recent testing and the only thing that showed up was mold. Put me in a moldy room or musty, I react almost immediately. I used to take shots and was allergic to dust and jute. I only have carpet in bedroom. I have the cleaning person due to my asthma. She is a life saver.

I have all the allergic type pillow cases and pillows and mattress covers. I am a social person and need to keep this in check for outings and people coming in. That still bothers me. What do you do when family and friends come over?

Ellen

(Seashell)
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Date Joined Dec 2012
Total Posts : 665
   Posted 3/26/2017 5:09 PM (GMT -6)   
Ellen:
What are you referring to when you ask me "What do you do when friends and family come over?"

Again . . . you are not contagious. You will not give anyone a pseudomonis colonization. Everyone has fungus, bacteria, yeast in their nasal passageways and sinus. Everyone even has MRSA in their nasal passageways and sinuses.

The difference between you and someone else is that your immune system is suppressed from the years of corticosteroids. An otherwise healthy person is able to keep the natural flora of bacteria, yeast, et. al in check without falling ill to an overabundant colonization.

You are actually continually reinfecting yourself. That is the culprit that you are facing, just as I was facing with my MRSA colonization. Once I had been exposed and the MRSA took home in my warm nasal passageways, the bacteria were free to reproduce without any limit due to my compromised immune system. My immune system, like yours, was suppressed due to long-term corticosteroid use.

Self-reinfection is why I am advocating that you have a ready stack of wash cloths and use a wash cloth on yourself one time . . and then toss the wash cloth into the laundry and wash. You will want to wash your towels and bedding with hot/warm setting on the washing machine (do not use the cold wash cycle). You can add bleach to your all-white linens.

Self-reinfetion is why I am advocating that you use paper towels with abundance. You decrease the likelihood that in washing or drying your face that fungus is lingering on the toweling - fungus that would then re-enter through your nose and mouth when you next use the towel.

You are needing to limit reinfection from yourself.

Keeping your hands away from your face. Touching your nose and then rubbing your eyes, for example. Portals of entry into your body are your nose, your mouth, and especially your eyes.

In using the Hibiclens soap, I did use it on my face with care not to get any of the soap suds into my eyes. I also used the Hibiclens to gently clean the easily accessible areas of my nasal passageways. Ex. I would take a sudsy Kleenex and clean the readily accessible nasal passageways and end by blowing my nose into a fresh Kleenex to flush the moisture out. Bag up any used Kleenex and tie with a twist-em.

You have little risk of infecting anyone because everyone in the general public has the same microorganisms in their noses, sinuses, mouths.

Your problem has evolved because your immune system is unable to regulate a normal flora population. Steroids are the cause.

That you have been on corticosterorids as long as you have is also troubling from an endocrinology standpoint. Your pituitary gland is likely suppressed to varying degrees. It would be wise for you to have a consultation with an endocrinologist to vet and discuss your long-term dosing of corticosteroids. I would definitely place this on your "To Do" list. Take this advice to heart from someone (me) who has broad endocrine failure.

I think all things will work out for you once you are in the hands of an infectious disease MD. Partnering an infectious disease MD with an endocrinologist would be ideal. Corticosteroids are both beneficial and detrimental. The effects of corticosteroids on the endocrine system are complex and complicated and need the focused knowledge of an endocrinologist. It is best if you seek an endocrinologist who practice is specific to the pituitary gland. You do NOT want an endocrinologist who practice is centered on diabetic care and treatment (which is often the bread and butter of endocrinology group practices). Take your time to research the scope of practice of the endocrinologist - you want an endocrinologist with pituitary expertise.
- Karen -
Pituitary failure, wide-spread endocrine dysfunction
Addison's disease
Mixed connective tissue disorder
Extensive intestinal perforation with sepsis, permanent ileostomy
Avascular necrosis of both hips and jaw
Receiving Palliative Care (care and comfort)
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