Severe nerve damage; coping with

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Defolot
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2017
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 8/7/2017 3:01 PM (GMT -6)   
So this might be the wrong place, and I apologize if it is. I have a friend with extensive nerve damage. He can't feel a thing on many parts of his body, like being cut on the hand. This mostly doesn't bug him much, except for one place. His genitals are completely numb, and feel nothing, not even pressure, even when attempting sex. He doesn't know how he'll ever have a sexual relationship and it's depressing him. Anyone have any suggestions or tips?

straydog
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2003
Total Posts : 15004
   Posted 8/7/2017 5:16 PM (GMT -6)   
Hello & welcome to Healing Well. So sorry to read about your friend & its great that you are looking out for him. What does the drs tell him about this nerve damage & what type of treatment is he receiving. Nerve damage can be caused by numerous things so it is really difficult to make suggestions without really knowing more information about him.

Take care.
Susie
Moderator in Chronic Pain & Psoriasis Forums

Defolot
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2017
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 8/7/2017 5:39 PM (GMT -6)   
It's pretty much the permanent kind, so cause doesn't matter much. But, the possible causes are his super premature birth or more likely, a lactose intolerance that went undiagnosed for ages. Or maybe something else.

Regardless, I don't think it can be treated. There must be someone out there who has ways of coping with this!

straydog
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2003
Total Posts : 15004
   Posted 8/7/2017 6:16 PM (GMT -6)   
Here at Healing Well, we have members that have various types of nerve pain & they are being treated with medications that treat nerve pain. This is why I asked the questions that I did. None of them found anything OTC to help. If your friend has not seen a dr for this, he really should.
Susie
Moderator in Chronic Pain & Psoriasis Forums

(Seashell)
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2012
Total Posts : 665
   Posted 8/8/2017 8:36 AM (GMT -6)   
Defolot:
Maybe you are posting with concerns about yourself under the pretense of a friend? No need to be shy here. This forum is a safe harbor to ask questions and seek insights from the personal experiences of others.

It would be important for your friend to work with a physician to have a baseline understanding of the sensory loss in order to see what may be available in terms of supportive treatment.

I will be honest. Lactose intolerance is not something that is generally associated with sensory loss or impairment. Premature birth would not normally be associated with fragmented or scattered sensory loss.

Has your friend had scattered sensory loss of recent onset or is tris pattern of sensory loss long-standing?

Poorly controlled blood glucose levels (type 1 or type 2 diabetes) would be a suspect in scattered sensory loss as you are describing. High blood glucose has the effect where the glucose seeps into surrounding soft tissue, impacting both sensory and motor nerve transmission. Diabetics with difficult to stabilize glucose levels are more likely to have sensory and motor nerve damage. The distal extremities (hands and feet) are first affected. Urogential sensation impairment is also an early causality. Erectile dysfunction in males is linked to diabetes that is difficult to regulate.

As far as intimacy, sexual intercourse is but one aspect. A solid relationship with a life partner is much deeper than sexual intercourse. A life partner will be open to finding ways to meet needs for intimacy that do not require the physical act of sex.

I encourage your friend to partner with a physician to better understand why he has sensory loss and to identify the type of sensory loss (ex small fiber vs large fiber nerve involvement; central nervous system or peripheral nervous system paresis).
Karen
Pituitary failure, wide-spread endocrine dysfunction
Addison's disease
Mixed connective tissue disorder
Extensive intestinal perforation with sepsis, permanent ileostomy
Avascular necrosis of both hips and jaw
Receiving Palliative Care (care and comfort)

pitmom
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Date Joined Jan 2015
Total Posts : 2116
   Posted 8/8/2017 9:04 AM (GMT -6)   
Since prostate issues can be a cause of erectile dysfunction, you may want to post in that forum as well.

Seashell is right about 'intimacy'. It can be defined so many ways.

If the concern includes procreation, there are ways to deal with that as well.

A urologist that deals with fertility issues may be the type of doctor your friend should consult.
multiple surgeries for rotator cuff both shoulders with residual chronic impingement syndrome, ulnar nerve transposition, carpal tunnel release, wrist ganglionectomies/denervectomies/tenolysis, multiple herniated discs, tarlov cyst, whiplash, bursitis of hips, tendonitis, torus, 3rd degree shoulder separation, torn labrum, ovarian cysts, fibroid tumors of the uterus

Defolot
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2017
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 8/11/2017 8:17 PM (GMT -6)   
I don't know much about nervous issues, I confess. That's sorta why I'm here. Thank you for the information.

I believe it is long-standing. I'm unsure.

And it's not erectile dysfunction. He um, can get it up if the mental part is there. He just has zero feeling in it whatsoever...

To quote him, "I didn't even know it was in until [they] started making noises..."

What kinds of treatments could be possible for him? I know it depends on the cause, but does he stand any chance of regaining nerve sensation?

I really appreciate your feedback! I tried anything I could think of to console him and your responses help a lot. ^^

Post Edited (Defolot) : 8/11/2017 8:23:25 PM (GMT-6)


pitmom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2015
Total Posts : 2116
   Posted 8/12/2017 4:19 PM (GMT -6)   
Has your friend consulted with more than one neurologist? Second opinions are invaluable.

I once dated a man that had severe spina bifida. He discovered that while certain parts did not respond to stimulation, other parts did. Focusing on the pleasurable stimulation of the parts that could feel became a sufficient substitute for him. (This is an open forum, so we must use tact. You can e-mail me if you can't 'fill in the blanks' on your own.)

Something else to consider...those that have undergone sex reassignment surgery have been successful in gaining/regaining the ability to experience sensation. Perhaps a consult with this type of surgeon might prove enlightening.
multiple surgeries for rotator cuff both shoulders with residual chronic impingement syndrome, ulnar nerve transposition, carpal tunnel release, wrist ganglionectomies/denervectomies/tenolysis, multiple herniated discs, tarlov cyst, whiplash, bursitis of hips, tendonitis, torus, 3rd degree shoulder separation, torn labrum, ovarian cysts, fibroid tumors of the uterus
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