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crohnieonthego
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2007
Total Posts : 73
   Posted 4/20/2008 7:43 PM (GMT -7)   
I went in for a colonoscopy about 3 weeks ago with a new specialist. A year ago when i went in for just a partial exam with biopsies my doctor at the time said i had active disease in my large intestine and a granuloma in my stomach. He then went on to say that i more than likely had crohn's disease but never really went into detail. At the time i was thinking well how does something that just effects my large intestine (which led me to believe that it is ulcerative colitis) become crohn's.
 
So back to the new specialist, went over the results more or less same as last time but she went into more detail, said i have active disease in my large intestine ( saying also i have inflammatory crohn's with no stictures or fistulas and that most people fall into one of the 3 and if maintained may not go into the other catagories ) and that my small intestine seems normal but i have granulomas in my small intestine as well ( which is new because he never scoped the small one the last time). Another fun thing is that my biopsies show active disease but my blood work is normal eyes so i dont know how that works and she basically said it made it hard to follow. Her over all thing was that i was being diagnosed with crohns because of these granulomas being present in the small intestine and in my stomach and these are only present in Crohn's disease not UC.
 
So my questions are, anyone else have granulomas? can anyone give me an idea of what causes these.*did some research online but hard to find answers specific to crohn's*? And has anyone had normal blood work but acitve biopsies?
 
Thank you for taking the time to read!

Crohn'snme
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 734
   Posted 4/20/2008 7:50 PM (GMT -7)   
What are ganulomas? Sorry, hadn't hear of that one before. My Crohn's started in my small intestine and pretty much went into remission and now is in my large intestine. My biopsies showed active disease. Crohn's can be very hard to diagnose. One thing, I'm understanding is that more and more they are treating them somewhat similar. So, does it really matter? I'm not sure. How are you presently feeling?? What medication are you on. I went from many things, to lastly Remicade and now Humira, which is treating me pretty well. Let me know. Take care. OREGON!

crohnieonthego
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2007
Total Posts : 73
   Posted 4/20/2008 7:56 PM (GMT -7)   
From what i have read on the internet they are basically a collection of cells, most of the research i found was based on people who had TB and these granuloma were found in the lungs, i think i found one site last year that talked about a granuloma in the stomach but i can't fine it now and from what i can remember it just basically said a mass of cells...so i am still trying to figure it out.

I feel fine right now, until just prior to my doctor visit i was on Imuran and Salofalk i had issues with the Imuran so we decided that i would stop taking it and would up my dose of Salofalk to try to kick me into remission. And that is the other weird thing i feel fine occassional stomach pain but nothing bad so i thought i was in remission but biopsies say otherwise. So now i am taking 1000mg 4x a day of salofalk for amonth to see if that will put me into remission then go back down to 500mg 4x a day and see how it goes from there. Seems like my body just doesnt want to cooperate. Feel fine , blood work says i am fine biopsies say otherwise.

FallColors
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2007
Total Posts : 1220
   Posted 4/20/2008 8:12 PM (GMT -7)   
Hello Happy (what a long name you have!)

Granulomas refers to when tissue becomes inflammed in response to infection and/or injury. Granulomas are not specific to CD but occur in many parts of the body for many different reasons. So I think your Dr. is telling you that you have inflammation. By the way, they can't scope the small intestine. They use a small bowel follow-thorugh test where you drink a barium solution and they x-ray you repeatedly. As to what causes the inflammed areas -- your immune system is out of whack and is attacking places in your body! There is no absolute link to food, allergies, stress, infection, etc., although it may be a combination of things and your genetic pre-disposition for getting CD. No clear answer yet for that! Too bad becasue then maybe we could sure it!

Please don't hesitate to ask your Dr many questions! Ask until you understand! Dr.s always seem very busy and some try to rush you out of their offices. Sit tight until you get answers. This is what you are paying them for. It is your body -- you need to know what is happening so you can take care of it in the best way possible. A well educated patient is what evry Dr. should hope for! And of course keep asking questions on this forum. I think many of these folks know more than several Dr. I've met!

abl
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 30
   Posted 4/22/2008 6:57 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi! I'm new here. I was diagnosed in 2000 and my biopsy report came back with the results of granuloma cells and my dr. told me that the findings of granulomas along with the inflammation and sores associated with the disease meant that I 110% had Crohn's. It is actually very specific to CD.  I hope this helps!
 
~Anna

Post Edited (abl) : 4/22/2008 8:27:12 PM (GMT-6)


abl
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 30
   Posted 4/22/2008 7:00 PM (GMT -7)   
I also wanted to add that you do not have to have granuloma cells to be diagnosed with Crohn's. Lots of people have Crohn's without the presence of granulomas but it is the only proof-positive way of knowing for sure that it is in fact Crohn's.

~Anna

Post Edited (abl) : 4/22/2008 8:26:44 PM (GMT-6)


abl
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 30
   Posted 4/22/2008 7:13 PM (GMT -7)   
This info was taken from the Mayo Clinic website:

Some people have clusters of inflammatory cells called granulomas, which confirm the diagnosis of Crohn's disease because granulomas don't occur with ulcerative colitis. In the majority of people with Crohn's, granulomas aren't present and diagnosis is made through biopsy and the location of the disease. Risks of this procedure include perforation of the colon wall and bleeding.
 
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