low gluten diet?

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pix
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Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 134
   Posted 6/9/2008 5:13 PM (GMT -7)   
Has anyone had any luck with a low gluten diet?  I have been reading about celiac disease, which may also be autoimmune, and how people with Crohn's may also have undiagnosed celiac disease.  Has it helped with the crohn's symptoms?  I don't want to restrict my eating if I don't have to, but if it helps, I might give it a try.

CrazyHarry
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Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 1034
   Posted 6/9/2008 5:59 PM (GMT -7)   
i have found that it helps. i know others who do it too and they also swear by it. i find that minimizing my grain intake (this includes sugar too) has made a great difference in my health. it is hard at first, but once you get the hang of it it is easy. i believe that there is a tremendous link between this disease and diet, however our docs and big pharma make their money by keeping us on pills and not telling us about how dietary changes can have a profound effect cos then they'd lose money (sorry for being a cynic).

instead of rice use quinoa. use buckwheat or amaranth grains. you can even use grains from nuts (almond flour). i suggest using gluten grains sparingly. use whole wheat (must have whole in front of the wheat part) if you do use wheat. most health food stores have gluten free labeled food. it is easier to find these products than you might suspect. and you get to have fun shopping and trying new food!

just remember to give it a couple of weeks to see if helps you. and all of us are different, so there is a chance that it may not have any beneficial effect for you at all (just wanted you to be aware of that).
Crazy Harry

---------------------------------------------
Crohn's since 1993 (17 yrs old then)
surgery in July '05 - removal of 2 inches at ileum and 8 inches of sigmoid colon (had fistula into bladder)
Nov '05 developed colonic inertia; July '06 told i needed ostomy surgery
began maker's diet in August '06 - now feeling the best ever with no symptoms of colonic inertia and i kept my colon
med free as of 10/31/07


sjkly
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Date Joined Dec 2007
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   Posted 6/9/2008 6:05 PM (GMT -7)   
Remember if you truely have celiac disease only a gluten free diet will be of much use. For those with mild sensitivities a low gluten diet may be helpful.
Sj

Osprey101
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Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 227
   Posted 6/12/2008 5:54 PM (GMT -7)   
There are a few papers- mainly from the 1980s- on how a low carbohydrate diet (which would include the exclusion of wheat and, therefore, wheat gluten) can benefit those with Crohn's. I can come up with those references if anyone wants them; I'm on a different computer than I normally use.

In fact, this was largely ignored until Atkins (whose diets I do not agree with), who discovered that some 85% of patients with Crohn's did substantially better on a low-carb diet- from what I have been told. My problem consisted of gaining weight, not losing it!

What I found really helped was the Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD). Google up some links, and then buy the book by Elaine Gottschall, "Breaking the Vicious Cycle." I'm off all my meds, and have had no bleeding since February. Note: My results are definitely not typical. I think I got started (oddly enough) on a celiac diet very early- followed up by the SCD 6 months later. In effect, I started it soon after I was overtly ill.

Others are correct when they say this should not help if Crohn's is an autoimmune disease. Frankly, given my sensitivity to certain foods (those containing oligosaccharides- complex carbohydrates like starch, for example), I can't see how this is autoimmune. I can control all aspects of my disease through diet. The crackpots who think this is an infectious disease- caused by MAP (which causes a disease that is *remarkably* similar to Crohn's called Johne's disease in cattle)- may not be such crackpots after all. The longer the carbohydrate chain, the "further" it goes into the gut prior to digestion and absorption. If they go too far- they feed bacteria that proliferate within the gut, shutting down absorption (causing diarrhea, weight loss, and nutrient deficiencies), and- in the case of MAP- ulceration and bleeding.

I don't know about y'all, but when I got ill, I lost weight as muscle. In cattle with Johne's, we call that protein losing enteropathy (PLE). It's not starvation- I wasn't losing weight as fat, I was losing it as muscle. I seriously think Crohn's is an infectious disease, at least in some patients diagnosed with the disorder. The SCD seems to "starve out" the bacteria.

After starting the SCD, I gained back 20 badly needed pounds in just 14 weeks. I don't know if that's normal or not for people in remission from Crohn's, but I attribute it to the diet.

Illini
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2007
Total Posts : 298
   Posted 6/12/2008 7:37 PM (GMT -7)   
I'm interested to see the references when you get the chance.

My sister-in-law tried the gluten-free diet briefly. It helped her GI issues and joint pain, but she didn't stick with it.


July 2007 Drug-Induced Liver Injury
January 2008 Crohn's Ileitis
Currently trying...
Enteral Nutrition, Omega-3 (Flax Oil and Fish Oil), VSL#3, Vitamin E


yogaprof
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Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 1665
   Posted 6/12/2008 7:55 PM (GMT -7)   
I am a poster-child for going gluten-free. I was very ill for two years, two surgeries, all the meds, lost a lot of weight, and nothing helped--not remicade, humira, nothing. I tested negative for celiac, but my naturapath's tests showed a gluten intolerance. I stopped it totally. the first 3 weeks nothing was different, and now I am completely fine. I have gained weight, can eat salads and all the things that caused me pain before, and I feel great. there is really nothing to lose in trying it, but give it a month, be really careful and see what happens. I wouldn't go back!
48 y/o woman.  Diagnosed 4/06 after colonscopy, SBFT, CT-scan all showed crohns. 3 months later, after pred and remicade, all tests showed no crohns. December '06 had adhesions cut through a laparoscopy. Now taking Glycolax, Ultra Fiber Plus, Florastor, and DHEA. Have become gluten-free diet per naturopath's tests.


Rider Fan
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Date Joined May 2008
Total Posts : 1445
   Posted 6/12/2008 8:21 PM (GMT -7)   
I am going to go gluten free for a month and see how it goes. This constant bloating and gas is driving me up the wall.
Dx'ed in 1999. No surgeries.

Current meds: 75 mg 6MP. 20mg prednisone.


Rider Fan
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Date Joined May 2008
Total Posts : 1445
   Posted 6/12/2008 9:02 PM (GMT -7)   
Can someone recommend a good website that would help me avoid gluten foods. Maybe one with a list of all legal and illegal foods on it?
Dx'ed in 1999. No surgeries.

Current meds: 75 mg 6MP. 20mg prednisone.


yogaprof
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 1665
   Posted 6/12/2008 9:37 PM (GMT -7)   
http://forums.glutenfree.com/
is where I hang out when I am not here :)
48 y/o woman.  Diagnosed 4/06 after colonscopy, SBFT, CT-scan all showed crohns. 3 months later, after pred and remicade, all tests showed no crohns. December '06 had adhesions cut through a laparoscopy. Now taking Glycolax, Ultra Fiber Plus, Florastor, and DHEA. Have become gluten-free diet per naturopath's tests.


Osprey101
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 227
   Posted 6/13/2008 1:52 AM (GMT -7)   
A little note- it's not the gluten you should be concerned about, unless you have celiac disease. Folks with celiac sprue need to worry about gluten in the sub-milligram range; it's an allergy, in effect. With Crohn's, you're trying to evade the wheat, not just the gluten. Unfortunately, gluten substitutes- rice, potato starch, etc.- will do just as good a job at feeding the gut bacteria as wheat (or BROW- barley, rye, oats, and wheat), resulting in diarrhea, pain, and discomfort. So- if gluten-free doesn't do it for you, take it a step further and look at the Specific Carbohydrate Diet.

Illini quite bravely asked for the references. As follows, in chronological order:


Br Med J. 1979 Sep 29;2(6193):764-6. Links=20
Treatment of Crohn's disease with an unrefined-carbohydrate, fibre-rich diet.
Heaton KW, Emmett PM.

Thirty-two patients with Crohn's disease were treated with a fibre-rich, unrefined-carbohydrate diet in addition to conventional management and followed for a mean of four years and four months. Their clinical course was compared retrospectively with that of 32 matched patients who had received no dietary instruction. Hospital admissions were significantly fewer and shorter in the diet-treated patients, who spent a total of 111 days in hospital compared with 533 days in the non-diet-treated control group. Whereas five of the controls required intestinal operation, only one diet-treated patient needed surgery. This is in strong contrast to general experience with this disease. Treatment with a fibre-rich, unrefined-carbohydrate diet appears to have a favourable effect on the course of Crohn's disease and does not lead to intestinal obstruction.


Z Gastroenterol. 1981 Jan;19(1):1-12.Links=20
[Sugar free diet: a new perspective in the treatment of Crohn disease? Randomized, control study]
[Article in German]
Brandes JW, Lorenz-Meyer H.

Since several studies have shown that patients with Crohn's disease have an increased consumption of refined carbohydrates, the influence of a diet excluding refined sugar on the course of the disease was examined. In a randomised control trial, 20 patients (10 patients in each group) with Crohn's disease were treated for an average of 18 months with two different diets. The patients used in the study had a low or middle activity of the disease. Drug treatment was omitted 14 days before commencement of the study. The first group was treated with a low carbohydrate diet (refined sugar excluded), the second group received a high carbohydrate diet (refined sugar-rich). In patients with higher activities of the disease (activity index 100-200 points), the diet which restricted refined sugar was superior to the sugar-rich diet; in 4 out of 5 patients the disease activity decreased and remained so throughout the study-period. In contrast to this 4 patients treated with the sugar-rich diet had to be taken off the treatment because of increasing activities of the disease. In patients with quiescent disease (activity index less than 100 points), neither of the diets showed detrimental effects. The statistical analysis of clinical and laboratory dates noted during the study period resulted in no significant differences between the two groups.


Hum Nutr Appl Nutr. 1984 Dec;38(6):469-73.Links=20
Diet in the management of Crohn's disease.
Workman EM, Alun Jones V, Wilson AJ, Hunter JO.

Thirty-three patients with Crohn's Disease were studied to see if their symptoms were related to food intolerances. Initial treatment to produce remission of symptoms was total parenteral nutrition (20), elemental diet (2) or elimination diet (11). Twenty-nine patients reported specific food intolerances, and 21 of these remained in remission on diet alone, the mean length of remission being 15.2 months. The most important foods provoking symptoms were wheat and dairy products.


Lancet. 1985 Jul 27;2(8448):177-80. Links=20
Crohn's disease: maintenance of remission by diet.
Jones VA, Dickinson RJ, Workman E, Wilson AJ, Freeman AH, Hunter JO.

20 patients with Crohn's disease took part in a controlled trial in which remission was maintained by either an unrefined carbohydrate fibre rich diet or a diet which excluded specific foods to which a patient was intolerant. 7 out of the 10 patients on the exclusion diet remained in remission for 6 months compared with none out of the 10 on an unrefined carbohydrate fibre rich diet (p less than 0.05, Fisher's exact test). In an uncontrolled study an exclusion diet allowed 51 out of 77 patients to remain well on the diet alone for periods of up to 51 months, and with an average annual relapse rate of less than 10%.


My commentary: Now- if Crohn's disease is autoimmune, how can the four studies cited above claim that an elimination diet can substantially ameliorate the symptoms of the disease? I could understand it if they were quickie studies running 6-12 months, but the Lancet article ran patients out to as long as 51 months (!) with an "average annual relapse rate of <10%." Holy cow!

Razzle
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Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 4392
   Posted 6/13/2008 5:19 AM (GMT -7)   
Osprey,

FYI, Celiac Disease is an autoimmune disease that is only triggered in the presence of gluten. Milk has been implicated in causing some cases of Type I Diabetes. And many foods that are thought to promote inflammation in the body (nightshades, wheat, dairy, trans fats, sugar, red meats, etc.) might contribute to inflammation in those with an autoimmune disease. So it is possible for foods to trigger or contribute to autoimmunity.

Take care,
-Razzle
Gluten & Sulfite Sensitivity, Many Food/Inhalant/Medication Allergies & Intolerances, Asthma, Gut issues (dysmotility, non-specific inflammation), UCTD (Lupus?), Osteoporosis, Anemia, T- & B-Cell Lymphopenia, malabsorption/malnutrition, Lyme Disease (Igenex Lab IgM WesternBlot positive/CDC negative), etc.
Meds:  Pulmicort, Injectable Vitamin B12, Herbs, Nutritional Supplements, Homeopathy.


EMom
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Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 990
   Posted 6/13/2008 5:43 AM (GMT -7)   
Have you seen the studies implicating MAP in Type 1 Diabetes? (I guess that could explain milk as a possible cause.) Just as in Crohn's, there are a number of doctors/scientists who now believe T1 Diabetes to have an infectious origin, and that it is *not* an autoimmune disease.

Also, I've now had three GIs (out of a team of 6--I haven't met the other 3!) at one of the top children's hospitals in the nation tell me they no longer believe Crohn's to be autoimmune. The last one I spoke with was three weeks ago. He talked at length with me explaining that it IS infectious. He said something like, "yes, and everyone has their theory about what the infectious agent is, but it could just be something that is normally there, but out of balance. A massive gut flora imbalance, if you will...we just don't know."

MAP, candida, clostridium, E. coli, take your pick... Maybe it's all of the above. That's why I believe diet and probiotics are the way to go. I ditto what Osprey says about the Specific Carb. Diet!
Mom to 16 year old boy diagnosed in June, 2007.
Omega 3s, digestive enzymes, probiotics, iron, vit. C, calcium w/D3, a good multivitamin, SCD legal yogurt, weaning off Asacol.
Started The Maker's Diet in Sept. '07. Gradually learning/using more SCD recipes, too! (cooking challenged)


Crohn's 4 ever
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2008
Total Posts : 207
   Posted 6/13/2008 7:05 AM (GMT -7)   
Yes sure have been on a strict gluten free, no dairy, no underground grown veggies, and although I was on methotrexate at the time, I was feeling pretty good. Wheat can be an irritant to anyone, and of course Milk or dairy (except old cheddar cheese and yogurt) usually causes havoc. I have been on other drugs, and latest is Humira, now mostly can eat everything. I still avoid wheat. Makes my bowels bloat. Been avoiding bread and no bloating for a month, cant beat that feeling.

Rider Fan
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Date Joined May 2008
Total Posts : 1445
   Posted 6/13/2008 8:15 AM (GMT -7)   
That's the feeling I want Crohn's 4 ever, no bloating. So you are ok with potatoes and rice, just not wheat and dairy?
Dx'ed in 1999. No surgeries.

Current meds: 75 mg 6MP. 20mg prednisone.


yogaprof
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 1665
   Posted 6/13/2008 8:26 AM (GMT -7)   
me, too, I have no bloating anymore and look great. potatoes and rice are fine for me and I eat lots of them.

Crohn's 4 ever
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2008
Total Posts : 207
   Posted 6/13/2008 10:35 AM (GMT -7)   
I am better now, I eat everything now, potatoes and carrots but I steam all my veggies except potatoes I boil those.  I still drink Rice milk because not risking the bloating from dairy.  Because I am on Cipro and flagyl I eat yogurt to help with the unbalanced bacteria.  As a general rule they say gluten or wheat is a cheap filler and not many people can tolerate it.  You have to keep a diary and when you pay, you know what to avoid.  I am lucky I can eat tomatoes and sauce.  My worst thing is salads, even with  Caesar salads, the rare times I do I have a digestive enzyme with it.  I have had my ups and downs the last 10 years, but when you think something works, it can go awry. Been on Humira, and had a scope a couple of months ago, no narrowing thank God.

pix
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 134
   Posted 6/13/2008 11:53 AM (GMT -7)   
Thanks for all the information, and I'm glad that others are interested in my post topic. It is interesting how little is actually known about the causes and cures for disease. I have had an eating disorder before I got crohns and autoimmune hepatitis, and I am "allergic" to telling myself that I "can't have" certain foods. I am willing to try to help myself, especially with my hepatitis, but I am wary of messing myself up with one diet after another. If I knew what would help, I would do it, I'm just scared. Help!

Osprey101
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 227
   Posted 6/13/2008 12:02 PM (GMT -7)   
Razzle: I'm quite familiar with celiac disease; I had convinced myself that's what I had, early on in my disease. I felt relief when I ate as if I had celiac sprue, but it wasn't complete. I eliminated every trace of the BROW proteins, and felt about 80% better. It was when I underwent endoscopy and biopsy that I was diagnosed with Crohn's disease; taking it from the celiac diet to the SCD was what completed my recovery. Still today, there are compounds with no trace of BROW glutens that can cause me discomfort, and unless one can tie together these compounds on the basis of something other than allergy, it's not a specific protein sensitivity. Moreover, if I have a tiny bit of wheat, etc., it does not cause me the great discomfort that a few mouthfuls will- very much unlike celiac sprue, which takes very tiny amounts to cause the reaction.

C4E brings up yogurt- and that is core to the SCD. However, it must be "properly" prepared. The junk we find at the store is frequently loaded with sugar or (god help us) high fructose corn syrup. Gottschall suggests avoiding L. bifidus; for the longest time, I wondered why. I still wonder why this is, but I've found some reports that bifidus is less desirable as gut flora; one study tied it closely to cancerous polyps, but I've only seen that in one study.

Anyway- the idea is to start with good cultures; I use Fage from "Trader Joes" as it contains only SCD-safe cultures (finding yogurt without bifidus is tricky). I start by simmering a gallon of milk, and allowing it to cool. Then add starter cultures; I turn a couple of tablespoons of starter yogurt into a very thin liquid by adding some of the simmered milk, and stirring it in. Incubate at 100-110F, which is easy enough if your oven has a pilot light; if not, turn on the oven light (electric), and see what temperature the oven equilibrates at. Store the cultures at this temperature for at LEAST 24 hours. At this point it is safe to eat.

Biochemically, this makes sense; the bacteria consume all the lactose, which is a disaccharide that feeds gut bacteria as many people lack the enzymes to break it down- hence the discomfort experienced by a substantial portion of the population.

The other reason is much more subtle; a couple of studies have indicated that live yogurt cultures may downregulate tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) production in the gut (Borrueal et al, 2002: Gut. Increased tumor necrosis
factor alpha production in Crohn's disease can be downregulated ex vitro by probiotic bacteria). Of course, we can do the same thing in the human body by injecting ourselves with Humira or Remicade- except, of course, that's a systemic shot of TNF alpha inhibitors that clearly has nasty side-effects like causing tumors. That's the side-effect of shutting down the signal system for the appearance of some types of tumor- not entirely unexpected.

Lastly, I have recently found peppermint oil to be of some help; if I am to consume a meal that may be marginally acceptable on the SCD for whatever reason, I take a pill of enteric-coated peppermint oil (ECPO). I'd have to dig up the paper, but someone did a study on ECPO and relief from ulcerative colitis or something similar, and found that it provided some degree of relief to 85% of the people using it. It isn't the easiest thing on the gut, but I suspect it has a bacteriostatic effect on the critters growing in the intestines. Ergo, rather than have pains from the bacteria going nutso when their favorite foods pass by, the peppermint oil beats them into submission- and I experience less pain and discomfort with the meal than I normally would.

Razzle
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 4392
   Posted 6/13/2008 4:54 PM (GMT -7)   
Osprey101 said...
Razzle: I'm quite familiar with celiac disease; I had convinced myself that's what I had, early on in my disease. I felt relief when I ate as if I had celiac sprue, but it wasn't complete. I eliminated every trace of the BROW proteins, and felt about 80% better. It was when I underwent endoscopy and biopsy that I was diagnosed with Crohn's disease; taking it from the celiac diet to the SCD was what completed my recovery. Still today, there are compounds with no trace of BROW glutens that can cause me discomfort, and unless one can tie together these compounds on the basis of something other than allergy, it's not a specific protein sensitivity. Moreover, if I have a tiny bit of wheat, etc., it does not cause me the great discomfort that a few mouthfuls will- very much unlike celiac sprue, which takes very tiny amounts to cause the reaction.

<snip>

Lastly, I have recently found peppermint oil to be of some help; if I am to consume a meal that may be marginally acceptable on the SCD for whatever reason, I take a pill of enteric-coated peppermint oil (ECPO). I'd have to dig up the paper, but someone did a study on ECPO and relief from ulcerative colitis or something similar, and found that it provided some degree of relief to 85% of the people using it. It isn't the easiest thing on the gut, but I suspect it has a bacteriostatic effect on the critters growing in the intestines. Ergo, rather than have pains from the bacteria going nutso when their favorite foods pass by, the peppermint oil beats them into submission- and I experience less pain and discomfort with the meal than I normally would.
Great - I'm glad you found relief with the SCD.  Some people don't do well with certain carbohydrates in general, because of an enzyme deficiency, bacterial imbalance, or something else.  I think the SCD addresses most of these causes.  But there are also some people who need to avoid oxalates, some need to avoid sulfur/sulfites, etc. - again because of enzyme deficiencies, metabolic anomalies, allergies, etc.  There are some genetic tests that can help define these conditions but research is ongoing.  Incidentally, not just proteins can trigger allergic responses.  There are other substances that can bind to mast cells and initiate the allergic cascade.  Sulfites are one such substance.  Also, if a non-protein food particle binds to a protein in the body, thereby creating a hapten, the hapten can then trigger an allergic response.  Unfortunately, no allergy test I know of will detect these reactions.
Peppermint oil has antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral properties.  It also soothes the enteric nerves, reduces nausea, reduces cramps/spasms in the gut, and helps normalize colonic motility (thus is great for IBS).  Fantastic supplement if one can handle it.  One gotcha with it is that it can promote acid reflux because it relaxes the lower esophageal sphincter.  I'm guessing the enteric coated version has less of an effect on the LES than a non-enteric coated version, but don't have any personal experience with this.  I discovered the benefits of peppermint oil when I was in 8th grade and so nauseated that I couldn't stand the smell of food.  My Grandmother had a bottle of peppermint oil in the cupboard and I would walk around the house holding the open bottle under my nose to keep from getting sick from the food smells.  That peppermint was a Godsend at the time because the doctors I saw about the problem were stumped as to the cause.  I was later diagnosed with Gastroparesis, and this was likely the cause of the severe nausea.
 
Take care,
-Razzle
Gluten & Sulfite Sensitivity, Many Food/Inhalant/Medication Allergies & Intolerances, Asthma, Gut issues (dysmotility, non-specific inflammation), UCTD (Lupus?), Osteoporosis, Anemia, T- & B-Cell Lymphopenia, malabsorption/malnutrition, Lyme Disease (Igenex Lab IgM WesternBlot positive/CDC negative), etc.
Meds:  Pulmicort, Injectable Vitamin B12, Herbs, Nutritional Supplements, Homeopathy.


Rider Fan
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Date Joined May 2008
Total Posts : 1445
   Posted 6/13/2008 6:51 PM (GMT -7)   
I bought some gluten free bread today. I think it's made from brown rice. I'm surprised how much it looks like bread, I expected it to be flatter for some reason. Anyway, it's delicious!
Dx'ed in 1999. No surgeries.

Current meds: 75 mg 6MP. 20mg prednisone.


yogaprof
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Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 1665
   Posted 6/13/2008 9:55 PM (GMT -7)   
I am glad you like it. I have given up on bread, cuz the rice bread I have had isn't worth eating. I make fabulous muffins and cookies, but bread just doesn't work for me. some cities have fresh bakeries that are good but the packaged stuff has a shelf-life of a year, which kinda gives me the creeps
48 y/o woman.  Diagnosed 4/06 after colonscopy, SBFT, CT-scan all showed crohns. 3 months later, after pred and remicade, all tests showed no crohns. December '06 had adhesions cut through a laparoscopy. Now taking Glycolax, Ultra Fiber Plus, Florastor, and DHEA. Have become gluten-free diet per naturopath's tests.


Rider Fan
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2008
Total Posts : 1445
   Posted 6/14/2008 8:57 AM (GMT -7)   
Ya there is a bakery with a guy who makes it himself right next to me. He says it only keeps unfrozen for 3 days b/c he uses no preservatives. It's really good. Guess I'm lucky.
Dx'ed in 1999. No surgeries.

Current meds: 75 mg 6MP. 20mg prednisone.


yogaprof
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 1665
   Posted 6/14/2008 1:49 PM (GMT -7)   
yes, you are lucky. a bakery is supposed be starting in my town, but for now, when my sister visits from 400 miles away, she brings it to me from Portland.
48 y/o woman.  Diagnosed 4/06 after colonscopy, SBFT, CT-scan all showed crohns. 3 months later, after pred and remicade, all tests showed no crohns. December '06 had adhesions cut through a laparoscopy. Now taking Glycolax, Ultra Fiber Plus, Florastor, and DHEA. Have become gluten-free diet per naturopath's tests.


gachrons
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Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 4527
   Posted 6/14/2008 4:42 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi Pix I know the feeling whether it's meds or diet there is always some anxiety. I cain't recommend anything .I do try to follow low residue diet it takes the guess work out of eating for me. I have mostly eaten this way since DX. I figure when I seen the dietician that it made sense to me easy to chew easy to digest. So I try to go with that. I am very thankful I don't have the bowel pain now. Just keep reading and maybe you"ll find something that jumps out at you. Have you talked to a dietician about what is the best diet for you? lol gail

Sugarmarie
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Date Joined Jul 2003
Total Posts : 1205
   Posted 6/15/2008 8:14 AM (GMT -7)   
CrazyHarry said...
i have found that it helps. i know others who do it too and they also swear by it. i find that minimizing my grain intake (this includes sugar too) has made a great difference in my health. it is hard at first, but once you get the hang of it it is easy. i believe that there is a tremendous link between this disease and diet, however our docs and big pharma make their money by keeping us on pills and not telling us about how dietary changes can have a profound effect cos then they'd lose money (sorry for being a cynic).

instead of rice use quinoa. use buckwheat or amaranth grains. you can even use grains from nuts (almond flour). i suggest using gluten grains sparingly. use whole wheat (must have whole in front of the wheat part) if you do use wheat. most health food stores have gluten free labeled food. it is easier to find these products than you might suspect. and you get to have fun shopping and trying new food!

just remember to give it a couple of weeks to see if helps you. and all of us are different, so there is a chance that it may not have any beneficial effect for you at all (just wanted you to be aware of that).


ALL Rice has no gluten you can have that with no problems.
Confucius say : He who goes to bed with itchy butt wakes up with stinky finger.

Words of wisdom: Never trust a fart

:) Sugarmarie A.K.A. Poopy Pants :)

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