You will not believe what my nurse just did

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ivy6
Elite Member


Date Joined Sep 2005
Total Posts : 10404
   Posted 7/10/2008 5:40 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi all.

The district nurse comes each week to give my methotrexate injection, because the rules here are that I'm not allowed to do a cytotoxic injection myself.

The nurse uncapped the needle, put it down on the table, picked it up again and then injected me! And I'm immunosuppressed! nono Isn't that one of the first rules of needle hygiene: never put the needle down once it's uncapped?

I'm so tempted to ring up the central office and complain, but this is a small community and I know it would bounce against me.

I hate feeling helpless against so-called professional "care".

Ivy, indignant.
Co-Moderator Crohn's Forum.


sammies
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2008
Total Posts : 493
   Posted 7/10/2008 5:46 PM (GMT -7)   
my goodness! I think you should call. You could start with something like I do so like the nurse and thank you for everything BUT. . . I'm concerned. Good ness gracious! You deserve the best care--don't compromise!

(Sometimes, when I go into a doc's office, if the paper on the table looks wrinkled, I change it!)
23 years with moderate Crohn's/colitis; fistulizing crohn's; pentasa, just started humira


CrohnieToo
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2003
Total Posts : 9448
   Posted 7/10/2008 6:02 PM (GMT -7)   
I'd be inclined to wait until her next visit and see if she does it again. If she does IMMEDIATELY question the wisdom of her doing so. Then if she doesn't mend her ways .....

Look, the needle didn't touch anything by her laying the syringe on the table. Lets not go overboard. All it was exposed to was some air. Air in your own home in which you live every day.

I'm not real familiar w/methotrexate but my understanding of any of these biologics is NOT to suppress our immune systems to the point of excessive susceptability but rather to just tamp down an overactive "component" of the immune system, not the entire immune system.
Some people are like Slinkies... Not really good for anything, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.


ivy6
Elite Member


Date Joined Sep 2005
Total Posts : 10404
   Posted 7/10/2008 6:07 PM (GMT -7)   
I don't think it touched anything, C2; I'm just annoyed because she did it at all. When I was being taught to inject Humira, that was one thing the nurse stressed over and over again: *never* put the needle down once it's uncapped. It's just basic hygiene.

It should be second-nature to her by now. She's not new to nursing, though she is new to our community. If she's doing this, I wonder what else she's doing.
Co-Moderator Crohn's Forum.


jujub
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 10392
   Posted 7/10/2008 6:11 PM (GMT -7)   
Putting the syringe down doesn't contaminate the needle, because it doesn't touch anything. The real reason you're not supposed to do that is it increases the risk of needle sticks for the person giving the injection.
Judy
 
Moderate to severe left-sided UC (21 cm) diagnosed 2001.
Avascular necrosis in both shoulders is my "forever" gift from steroid therapy.
Colazal,  Remicade, Nature's Way Primadophilus Reuteri. In remission since April, 2006.
 
Co-Moderator UC Forum
Please remember to consult your health care provider when making health-related decisions.


CrohnieToo
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2003
Total Posts : 9448
   Posted 7/10/2008 6:11 PM (GMT -7)   
And that is why I said I'd let it go until she does it again and THEN address the situation. Ask her outright if she makes a habit of doing so. Taking the cap off a needle isn't that big a deal. Insist that she NOT decap it until ready to draw the med and inject it. Heck, it may well be her ONLY "bad habit".
Some people are like Slinkies... Not really good for anything, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.


ivy6
Elite Member


Date Joined Sep 2005
Total Posts : 10404
   Posted 7/10/2008 6:15 PM (GMT -7)   
Thanks, Judy and C2. I didn't know that the rule was to protect the injector, not the injectee.

If I'm lucky, I won't get her again. There are lots of nurses and they take turns.

I.
Co-Moderator Crohn's Forum.


CrohnieToo
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2003
Total Posts : 9448
   Posted 7/10/2008 6:20 PM (GMT -7)   
I'm not trying to protect the injector, Ivy. You said yourself you had some concern about repercussions to you if you "reported" her. So, the "easiest" way is to handle it just between you and her and if that doesn't work then ... do what you've gotta do.
Some people are like Slinkies... Not really good for anything, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.


SydneyJo
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 1354
   Posted 7/10/2008 7:25 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi Ivy,
I would have been worried too. I would do what C2 suggested, dont say anything unless it happens again, you maybe lucky enough not to get her again anyway. Jo

tsitodawg
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 845
   Posted 7/10/2008 11:13 PM (GMT -7)   

I would not get yourself all worked up about this.  For nearly 4 years, I was on a monthly dose of Remicade at the 10 dose, along with weekly methotrexate injections. It is very easy to scare yourself about getting an infection.  The truth is, you still have an immune system, but it has just been compromised to that of a normal person.  Yes, we are still able to get infections easier, but don't get to the point that you are worrying about everything. Stress is worse on your body. 

There are germs and bacteria everywhere.  We carry staph on our skin all of the time, but very few get it.  You are right in that you should still be conscious of your nurses technique and cleanliness, but just putting a needle on a table is no reason to report someone. Did she steralize the needle before or after?  Did she steralize your skin with an alcohol pad? 


Roni
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2003
Total Posts : 2480
   Posted 7/11/2008 7:19 AM (GMT -7)   
I completely disagree about the needle being okay to touch a table. A table is not sterile, unless it was wiped with alcohol or bleach. There a number of things on that table that contaminate the needle: fingerprints with bacteria or a virus, food crumbs, dirty skin cells, etc.

Bacteria and viruses are very very small and can live for days on surfaces.

A couple of times, when getting bloodwork, the person wiped my arm with alcohol, then touched my vein with their bare finger and put the needle in. Boy, was I mad!

Don't ever let someone compromise your health.
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