OT: Disaster preparedness for crohns peeps

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randynoguts
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   Posted 9/18/2008 3:00 AM (GMT -7)   
 maybe i should keep my mouth shut , but hey ive never been one to keep quiet....  with so many of us in disater zones, whether it be hurricanes, volcano's earthquakes , tornados etc... we all have to be prepared to survive on our own ...now i know this is possible cause people do it all the time ..
 
    i will start and then you guys can add to the list of low cost easy to do things to help us all out and not have to depend on the "guvment" for everything..
 
 
    first find some sort of large contanier to keep things in.
 
    1. clean drinking water is the most important thing to have
    2. shelter is number 2  a tarp or small tent is good
    3. food that will not spoil is a good thing to have, canned goods, dry food etc...plus most canned goods have liquid in them decreasing the need for water.
    4. of course a supply of needed medicines will be needed. if you cant afford to purchase a whole prescription extra for emergencies, try taking 1 or 2 pills from each one for a few months and pu them in your stash. most are good for a couple years. this way you will just renew a couple days early and no real jump in cost. byt he time your done you can have a couple weeks worth .
     5. sanitation is next or you can put it higher on the list, a 5 gallon bucket and some garbage bags, a shovel , and wiping material.
      6. some anti bacterial wipes, lotion, soap. the less water you use the more for drinking.
      7. of course a first aid kit, a fire starting kit (magnesium) so you can light cooking fires and for heat. in a disaster there will be plenty of wood to burn so dont worry about having fuel.
      8. a couple of cutting tools, knives, hatchet, saw etc... you never know what you will need them for.
       9. a small sewing kit, for more than you think, repairing your shelter, stitching an open wound, fishing, etc...
      10.  a couple books, sounds funny but you will be bored and you can use the paper for fires, tp. writing mesages on etc...
       11. and finally for my list is a means of defending your self against the ones who are not prepared, for if the situation persists, hungry thisty people WILL take what you have for your family by any means they can...
 
 
   ok so what ya got?   btw all of this stuff can fit in a container from wally world in the auto motive section are some good quality black and gray ones. by shopping around i bet you can get most or all of this for under 100 bucks.  think thrift stores, garage sales, flea markets etc...  in fact next time i make one for someone i will keep track of what it costs..
randynoguts 



     http://www.geocities.com/randynogutsweb/


lamb61
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Date Joined Jan 2005
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   Posted 9/18/2008 3:27 AM (GMT -7)   
Great topic Randy! Having spent 2 days with no electricity I have one more for your list.

12. A source of light, be it flashlights with extra batteries or lanterns. Or even an old fashioned kerosene lamp, the kind with a wick -- I was very glad to have one on Monday night.

Oh can't forget the generator if you can afford one, we just decided this is our next large purchase.

Lamb61
 


LMills
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Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 1753
   Posted 9/18/2008 5:12 AM (GMT -7)   
I know you put the cutting tools on there, but from experience, a can opener on a keychain is pretty important...I always seem to forget that and up taking a lot longer to open my meal...
20 years old, Diagnosed with severe Crohn's and colitis in May of 2008.
Currently taking:
Prednisone, pentasa, alinia, bentyl, prilosec, tandem plus, and the occasional ultracet
Surgery for ectopic pregnancy(very possibly due to Crohn's inflammation) in July of 2008.
Due to start Imuran September 17 depending on blood results.


Zanne
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Date Joined Apr 2005
Total Posts : 3763
   Posted 9/18/2008 6:22 AM (GMT -7)   
Except for the drinking water, I can just go to my attic and take out my camping stuff, and then raid my pantry. My husband has always accused me of keeping our bank account in the pantry cause I stock up whenever anything is on sale. So off to buy water!
Suzanne

CD 19 years offically, 29 unofficially. 3 resections '93, '95 '97
Symptoms constantly but all tests show only minor ulcerations. Currently having multiple episodes of gastritis with no known cause.


Prednisone, 6MP,Prevacid, B12 shots, Bentyl, Xifaxan.....


Zanne
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2005
Total Posts : 3763
   Posted 9/18/2008 6:23 AM (GMT -7)   
Oh and I forgot, I even have a port a potty in the camping stuff, so I'm really good to go!!!!
Suzanne

CD 19 years offically, 29 unofficially. 3 resections '93, '95 '97
Symptoms constantly but all tests show only minor ulcerations. Currently having multiple episodes of gastritis with no known cause.


Prednisone, 6MP,Prevacid, B12 shots, Bentyl, Xifaxan.....


Stef17
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2003
Total Posts : 1811
   Posted 9/18/2008 8:51 AM (GMT -7)   
During Hurricane Wilma in 2005 we had no electricity for 4 days - none of our neighbors were prepared at all. We were the only ones with a small grill and charcoal. So, everyone came over to make their coffee or what have you. We even cooked a pot of hamburger helper on the grill. So, I say, if you don't have a small propane burner, at least make sure you have one of those tiny grills and some charcoal and lighter fluid.

Also with the meds - just like Randy said, a lot of insurance companies will let you refill a few days early. Mine will let me refill almost a week ahead. So, I've been refilling early and saving a week's worth of medicine - after a few months you can easily have 1 month's worth to spare and it doesn't cost you a thing!

FitzyK23
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Date Joined May 2005
Total Posts : 4219
   Posted 9/18/2008 9:01 AM (GMT -7)   
I also use mail order so I usually have months of medicine on hand.

I recommend keeping a list of you VIP most important things. The govt recommends you have a ready evacuation bag but if you are in an area that doesn't have disasters much you probably won't have one. Plus your VIP items are probably things you use daily.

One day I had just got home from school... was relaxing, and there was a knock at my door. It was a gas guy saying "oops, there is a big leak on the property behind your house, we are evacuating the neighborhood." I had no idea what to grab. They were basically telling me to get out now! I grabbed my dog, my laptop, and my glasses, my meds, and cell phone. I didn't grab the cat because he HATES the car and I really didn't think the neighborhood was going to blow.

But I should have asked if the gas was toxic, and grabbed him. I didn't have a carrier ready. I didn't take dog food with me. Or her water bowl. I didn't bring a change of clothes.

Obviously I could have just gone to a friends house but it gave me a preview of how not prepared I was. We were allowed back in that night.

In the winter we always have canned goods we can cook on our wood stove if we lose power, a couple jugs of drinking water, and some fire wood.
26 Year old married female law student (last year!!). Diagnosed w/ CD 4 years ago, IBS for over 10 years before that, which was probably the CD. I am sort of lactose intollerant too but can handle anything cultured and do well w/ lactose pills and lactaid. For crohns I am currently on Pentasa 4 pills/4x day and hysociamine prn. I also have bad acid reflux and have been on PPI's since age 13. I have been through prilosec, prevacid, and nexium. Currently I am on Protonix in the morning and Zantac at night. I also take a birth control pill to allow some fun in my life.


d2parrotperson
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2008
Total Posts : 320
   Posted 9/18/2008 9:02 AM (GMT -7)   
Excellent topic! Batteries or a shake or wind up flashlight, battery or wind up radio, propane tanks (full) if you have a sm. grill, forks, spoons, knives (plastic or metal), enamelware cups (won't break) plates & or bowls, MRE's are perfect from a commissary, salt (in case you sweat excessively), a "bug out bag" in case you need to hike somewhere.
150mg Azathioprine, Lomotil, Iron, Nexium 2/day, Fentanyl patch, Oxycodone, Baclofin
Crohn's, Fibromyalgia, Several bulging discs, Bone spurs, Osteoarthritis, Osteopenia, Reflux, Stenosis, Strictures, Dengenerating facet joints
2 resections
 
Stephanie
When I am weak, then am I strong


Zanne
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2005
Total Posts : 3763
   Posted 9/18/2008 9:54 AM (GMT -7)   
This is a good post. I have everything except water and thought I was all set. But I never thought of saving up meds and filling scripts a few days early. That is just plain brilliant. My insurance is a wicked pain so I can only fill a day in advance, but I'm going to start this time and hopefully I should be all set before the dead of winter in the Northeast.
Suzanne

CD 19 years offically, 29 unofficially. 3 resections '93, '95 '97
Symptoms constantly but all tests show only minor ulcerations. Currently having multiple episodes of gastritis with no known cause.


Prednisone, 6MP,Prevacid, B12 shots, Bentyl, Xifaxan.....


gachrons
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 4527
   Posted 9/18/2008 10:24 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi I think that they should make underground vaults,doesn't have to be huge, that can be buried and water safe for to store things it ,if a person had some kind of safe place to store things then they could put things in it that they could access after things blow over. Knowing that some things are safe would be a big help to people. Personal and needed things. Of course we could all use Snipers knowledge as well . Great thread Randy. lol gail
Hallarious woman over 50 ,CD ,IBS 27 years--resection,fistula's,obstructions,and still alive.lol gail


FitzyK23
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2005
Total Posts : 4219
   Posted 9/18/2008 1:00 PM (GMT -7)   
Randy - I think some of the reason a lot of people need help from the Govt is that the stuff that they did have to live on was destroyed in the disaster. In a snow storm for me thats not likely to happen. But in a hurricane when your house blows down and you are up to your waist in water, all those supplies you bought probably aren't going to help much.
26 Year old married female law student (last year!!). Diagnosed w/ CD 4 years ago, IBS for over 10 years before that, which was probably the CD. I am sort of lactose intollerant too but can handle anything cultured and do well w/ lactose pills and lactaid. For crohns I am currently on Pentasa 4 pills/4x day and hysociamine prn. I also have bad acid reflux and have been on PPI's since age 13. I have been through prilosec, prevacid, and nexium. Currently I am on Protonix in the morning and Zantac at night. I also take a birth control pill to allow some fun in my life.


Zanne
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2005
Total Posts : 3763
   Posted 9/18/2008 2:06 PM (GMT -7)   
When my Parents house was being built the foundation was poured in the wrong place. So when they fixed it we ended up with a "tunnel" that was big enough for shelves and a walkway the length of the house. This was in the late '50s early '60s. It was always called "the bomb shelter" and my Mom kept all the emergency supplies there. So if the house ever flew away, we were all set. Of course if a bomb ever went off, I'm not so sure it would have been too good. Then again, the chance of the house blowing away in New England, not so big. The chance that the floor would flood, happened more than once!!!!
Suzanne

CD 19 years offically, 29 unofficially. 3 resections '93, '95 '97
Symptoms constantly but all tests show only minor ulcerations. Currently having multiple episodes of gastritis with no known cause.


Prednisone, 6MP,Prevacid, B12 shots, Bentyl, Xifaxan.....


justjenjen
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2003
Total Posts : 518
   Posted 9/18/2008 2:15 PM (GMT -7)   
Gloves--to protect your hands when moving debris
Wrench--to turn your gas off at the meter (common knowledge in 'earthquake country')
Medical supplies--some of us have ostomies!!
Did anyone mention a change of clothes??
Boots--broken glass and debris is not much match for tennis shoes

Good thread!

ivy6
Elite Member


Date Joined Sep 2005
Total Posts : 10404
   Posted 9/18/2008 3:05 PM (GMT -7)   
Pads, dressings etc for fistulas.

Randy, how big does the storage container for this stuff need to be? Is it a cubic foot, or what?

I.
Co-Moderator Crohn's Forum.


ivy6
Elite Member


Date Joined Sep 2005
Total Posts : 10404
   Posted 9/18/2008 3:06 PM (GMT -7)   
And if you're on Humira, an ice pack and freezer bag to keep your injection safe.
Co-Moderator Crohn's Forum.


Ides
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2003
Total Posts : 7077
   Posted 9/18/2008 3:30 PM (GMT -7)   
My late husband worked in emergency preparedness. All of our emergency gear is stored in two large garbage cans on wheels in an area that will withstand collapse in an earthquake [our most likely event]. Every year, I change out the water, batteries, food, etc. If any family member has had a significant change in weight, I change out the clothing.

Also, everyone should keep emergency gear in their auto trunk or storage area. Coveralls are great and work well for both genders. A small first-aid kit, short collapsible shovel, gloves, flashlight, and length of rope were some of the things my husband kept in his trunk. After our Inagural Day Wind Storm, he added a saw because many of the roads between his work and our home were impassable.
Moderator Crohn's Disease Forum
CD, Ankylosing Spondylitis, lupus, small fiber peripheral neuropathy, avascular necrosis, peripheral artery disease, degenerative disc disease, and a host of other medical problems.
 


HabsHockeyFan
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2006
Total Posts : 3130
   Posted 9/18/2008 3:35 PM (GMT -7)   
I have my snow/ice storm box all ready. It is also the plastic tub we take camping. It now has 3 packs of baby wipes in it after this years camping trip.

my emergency tote is bright orange so I can always find it even if the basement gets dark. And it's plastic to keep everything dry (mostly because I worry about the sump pump dying and not a natural disaster
Dx'd '90 (emergency rupture), symptoms ignored long before that, '03 fistulas and bad flagyl reactions, B12 weekly, Pentasa [until I surrender to the bigger meds]
I'm riding on the escalator of life....


GeeBee
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 24
   Posted 9/18/2008 4:04 PM (GMT -7)   
Living in New Zealand where we are on a fault line and often have earthquakes I have always been worried about "The Big One". I have a medium sized suitcase on wheels that I leave in my car boot all the time, another one in our garage where it should be safe and I make hubby take one in his car as well.

These are all equipped with: wind up torch and radio; enough medicine for a week; spare clothes; toiletries; knife; fork; spoon; can opener; water; dried food (lighter than cans) such as fruit& soup; waterproof shelter; sleeping bag; waterproof matches; first aid kit; rope; sharp knife; family documents; dog and catfood for 2 days; spare dog leads and I have a copy of our family photos at my workplace and at my sisters. I think that is everything!

Hopefully I will never have to use them but it is peace of mind to know they are there.

randynoguts
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Date Joined Jan 2003
Total Posts : 6050
   Posted 9/18/2008 10:00 PM (GMT -7)   
ok the container should be about 2x2x3.a size that can be thrown in the car at a moments notice or can be taken to the basement etc.. can be lifted by one person , two if its packed full, a lockable lid to keep kids out, some of the stuff i left off like clothes etc.. cause you dont NEED clean clothes to survive. and as for a hurricane desroying your house, and leaving you unable to get to your supplies, well ask sniper why he leaves when one is coming. no huricane has hit anywhere without at least 4-5 days notice in decades. so no excuse for hanging around. i left out can openers cause so many canned goods come with pop tops now and the hatchet and knife can be used for the same purpose. i just forget many of you dont have military experiance or go camping etc... good list though im sure there is more.
randynoguts 



     http://www.geocities.com/randynogutsweb/


Sniper
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Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 6518
   Posted 9/19/2008 7:40 AM (GMT -7)   
If you can get your hands on some MRE's( meals ready to eat) they are not bad, but then I thought C rations were pretty good. Also they make battery operated fans that will run for 8 hours on 8 d cells. We have two. We also have a small propane burner made by Burtan. Its only about 12 inchs by 12 inches and runs on a can of propane about the size of a can of bug spray. You drop the can in, flip a lever and its ready to cook. We try to keep lots of ice in the freezer mostly milk jugs filled with water. They last longer than bag ice and the water does not run out when they melt.
Nothing can take the place of just good sense. In our case we leave when a hurricane is going to hit. I cant tread water that long so I drive away. We can replace or do without anything we leave behind. Now when it comes to earth quakes, mud slides, and other such disasters I guess I would have to do the same thing I learned in the Army . It works for nuclear attacks. You put your head between your knees and kiss your butt goodbuy...
If we would read the secret history of our enemies,we would find in each mans life sorrow and suffering enough to disarm all hostility.


Matthew
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Date Joined Oct 2004
Total Posts : 3932
   Posted 9/19/2008 1:06 PM (GMT -7)   
Sniper: When you are starving, anything looks good after awhile! LOL, a fact I'm sure you know from "Nam.
BTW, I haven't seen a single Crohn's peep say anything about toilet paper, though someone mentioned babywipes.

Matthew

justjenjen
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2003
Total Posts : 518
   Posted 9/19/2008 2:49 PM (GMT -7)   
Ok, this sounds weird, but the tastiest Mexican rice I've ever eaten in my life came from a MRE!!

randynoguts
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2003
Total Posts : 6050
   Posted 9/20/2008 1:50 AM (GMT -7)   
ok i forgot an good water source that i remembered after i logged off last time... everyone has one,, can you guess? ok when disaster strikes, shut off your main water conection to your home. so that your water wont be contaminated.... the answer is your water heater! every water heater has a drain valve at the bottom. each hold between 40-80 gallons of water depending on size. after it cools down you can drain the water as little as you need. the pipes in you house also contain water. open the highest faucet a little and then go to the lowest point in the system, downsatirs if in a 2 story or the basement etc.. the water will drain out enough for a couple days if your carefull. but the most important thing is to shut off your main valve BEFORE the water can drain out of your house. just more FYI, oh also the toilet tank holds a couple gallons. not too appetizing but it could save your life. at least the dog and cat can drink it if you dont want too.
randynoguts 



     http://www.geocities.com/randynogutsweb/


broomhilda
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Date Joined May 2007
Total Posts : 1488
   Posted 9/21/2008 7:36 PM (GMT -7)   
I never thought about the water heater!

Not a lifesaver unless your significant other is under a tree....chainsaw blades & oil is something people tend to forget!

Want to make the stuff in the freezer stay frozen longer? Try wrapping meats in several layers of newspaper and/or paper bags and place items next to those nifty frozen gallons of water you pre-made.

A capful of ammonia poured into a large cooler of water is a great way to use up that melting ice water drained off of cooler to sanitize towels and the like. We used this on the baseball fields in the summer to keep the catchers soaked down with wet towels. Naturally, every other player had to get into the act so we had to come up with something germ free for all to use. I think a cold wet towel after a day of no electricity and cutting up tree limbs sounds pretty refreshing!

Last but not least...how about some Boost. It doesn't have to be refridgerated until you open it. It would be kind to most of our stomachs under such circumstances too.
Dx'd Jan'06, 1st Resection 7/06, Humira, Imuran, B12 injections, Nexium, Lexapro, Glucosamine, Multi-Vitamin, Ultracet Secondary conditions: Psorasis, Osteoarthritis, Fibromyalgia, Lactose Intolerant, gallstones, peri-menopausal.


Dagger
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Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 1522
   Posted 9/21/2008 10:36 PM (GMT -7)   
Fill a clean bathtub with water. Of course this only works when you can anticipate a disaster, like a storm.

Big garbage bags can be used as rain ponchos, they can keep supplies dry, for insulation from the wet ground, protect food from insects like flies and ants.

Bug spray: mosquitoes love disasters.

Duct tape!!!!!

Bleach for sanitizing just about anything.
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