Bacterium 'to blame for Crohn's'

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Reef08
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 267
   Posted 10/20/2008 7:21 PM (GMT -7)   
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/7679347.stm

"A shortage of naturally-occurring bacteria is thought to trigger the inflammatory gastrointestinal disorder by over-stimulating the immune system."

Keeper
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2008
Total Posts : 1058
   Posted 10/20/2008 9:32 PM (GMT -7)   
I love it - they're starting to put the pieces together. I am guessing that there is a complex of mutually supporting bacteria that this one is part of. There are likely several related bacteria that perform different functions and control different aspects of the gut immune reaction. Faecalibacterium prausnitzii - what a mouthful! For ease of navigation, I am reproducing the above page as a link: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/7679347.stm

pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20576
   Posted 10/20/2008 9:42 PM (GMT -7)   
Awesome article, thanks for posting if Reef, and thanks keeper for activating the link!!

:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)


gachrons
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 4527
   Posted 10/21/2008 5:20 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi Thanks for the info . lol gail
Hallarious woman over 50 ,CD ,IBS 27 years--resection,fistula's,obstructions,and still alive.lol gail


EMom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 990
   Posted 10/21/2008 5:41 AM (GMT -7)   
Awesome! Thanks, Reef!
Mom to 16 year old son diagnosed in June, 2007.
Omega 3s, digestive enzymes, probiotics, vit. C, calcium w/D3, a good multivitamin and SCD legal yogurt
Started The Maker's Diet in Sept. '07. Gradually learning/using more SCD recipes, too! (cooking challenged)


Keeper
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Date Joined Jun 2008
Total Posts : 1058
   Posted 10/21/2008 10:32 PM (GMT -7)   
I found another paper that suggests that there are a few bacteria that are normally present that are depleted or even absent in Crohn's. That article suggested that the inflammation in the bowel was responsible. They cited a rebound in those bacterial populations under infliximab or high dose cortisol as evidence that the inflammation was responsible for the depopulation effect. They had a detailed assessment of the bacterial populations in Crohn's patients in different stages of illness and pointed out that for remission of less than one year, the inflammation driven depopulation of the specific bacteria persisted. For remission of greater than one year, bacterial populations returned to near normal. This was taken as indication that inflammation was controlled for those patients. Or more accurately, remission for more than a year requires that inflammation be under control. It also indicates that most treatment does not provide the needed inflammation control. See: here (warning - serious jargon and overload of detail)

Osprey101
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 227
   Posted 10/21/2008 11:00 PM (GMT -7)   
Keeper- could you post the full URL in the link above? It's not parsing correctly. :)

pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20576
   Posted 10/21/2008 11:00 PM (GMT -7)   
Well I must be in big trouble...I've never been in full remission my entire 17 yrs of having this stupid disease. Good info keeper!!

:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)


Keeper
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2008
Total Posts : 1058
   Posted 10/22/2008 10:05 PM (GMT -7)   
The link was http://www.ccfa.org/ccfaprof/ibd-journal/2.08%20-%20Active%20Crohn%27s%20Disease.pdf and was found by doing a Google search for "Faecalibacterium prausnitzii + Crohn's" without the quotes. The page showed up on the second page of results with the title "Active Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis can be specifically ..." as a .pdf. Possibly it is a cached page??

PB4 - the lack of remission means that you have never had your inflammation under control. The implication of their observations is that if you can get inflammation under control. you can get longer term remissions. They suggest using bacterial ecology profiling as a diagnostic test for Crohn's, since the active disease results in a characteristic deficiency in certain bacteria.

pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20576
   Posted 10/22/2008 10:20 PM (GMT -7)   
Thanks Keeper...I'm keeping my fingers crossed that there will be hope for me, I just hope it's soon, I'm really tired of this disease already, I was a young lady when I first got sick (24) and now I'm an old bag (41), losing most of my 20's and all of my 30's to this disease has been hard, I can't even imagine how it's been for those who've had it 30+ yrs.

Anxious as usual to see what other juicy tid-bits you come across, thanks for sharing.

:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)


Reef08
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 267
   Posted 10/23/2008 6:55 AM (GMT -7)   
Thanks for the link Keeper. So it looks like the inflammation causes the dysbiosis, not the other way around.
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