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tsitodawg
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 845
   Posted 12/16/2008 3:00 AM (GMT -7)   
.

Post Edited (tsitodawg) : 11/13/2011 3:33:38 AM (GMT-7)


Texan with Crohn's
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2007
Total Posts : 362
   Posted 12/16/2008 4:57 AM (GMT -7)   
I don't doubt this when your CD is what is termed "mild" and is up in the small intestine. My colonoscopy wasn't worth the trouble... won't be doing that again unless it's demanded during hospital stay (again). They gotta catch me first. :)

gachrons
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 4527
   Posted 12/16/2008 5:10 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi I did read about something last night too about ome side being harder to see results then the other. Was wandering how effective CT scans are.Kinda scarry to say the least and now with prep warnings it's getting to be a hard call that's for sure .lol gail
Hallarious woman over 50 ,CD ,IBS 27 years--resection,fistula's,obstructions,hemmies,and still alive.lol gail


MikeB
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 1169
   Posted 12/16/2008 6:35 AM (GMT -7)   
The new "virtual colonoscopy" is probably pretty good for detecting large polyps or tumors, but it can't tell much about inflammation or ulcerations, and of course you can only do biopsies by a standard colonoscopy. When I see these stories abuot colonoscopies not being as effective as advertised, it is usually in the context of colon cancer screening. Those of us with IBD have them done for a different reason (although we also need the screening) -- to monitor the status and progression of our inflammatory disease, for which a direct look via colonoscopy is essential. It is also important to realize that colonoscopy effectiveness is largely a function of the operator. The specialist here is a gastroenterologist who has completed the standard three-year internao medicine residency and ther now-standard three-year GI fellowhship. I would bet that most of those reported incomlpete scopes were done by general surgeons or other specialists who just dn't have the experience and time at the wheel to be fully accomplished at the procedure. Stories like this aside, I'll still opt for the most nearly universally effective test. And they are also working on new scope technology that borrows from the capsule endoscopy -- a smaller devise that basically crawls through your colon snapping visuals.

LMills
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 1753
   Posted 12/16/2008 7:35 AM (GMT -7)   
The disadvantages even with the advances made with medicine are always too apparent...but I'm still glad we at least have tests of this nature and can see anything at all. I can't imagine how much harder things would be for the doctors without colonoscopies. endoscopies, CT scans, etc.
Hopefully more advances will be made soon to better these tests. Especially with the alarming rise in IBD/IBS.
20 years old, Diagnosed with moderate to severe Crohn's and Colitis in May of 2008.
Currently taking:
Prednisone(down to 10 mg), pentasa, bentyl as needed, prilosec, tandem plus, humira, and good probiotics
Surgery for ectopic pregnancy most likely the result of severe Crohn's inflammation in July of 2008.

"He who has a why to live for can bear with almost any how."


CrohnieToo
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2003
Total Posts : 9448
   Posted 12/16/2008 9:33 AM (GMT -7)   
See

http://www.healingwell.com/community/default.aspx?f=17&m=1321932

The two articles linked in that thread clarify things a bit more. Tho they are still "lay press" rather than a good PubMed abstract.


Some people are like Slinkies... Not really good for anything, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.


MikeB
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 1169
   Posted 12/16/2008 9:55 AM (GMT -7)   
I see from C2's second post that this refers to the recent discussion concerning flat polyps, which can go malignant without the more easily recognized protrusions that alert the colonoscopy operator to remove or biopsy them. Of course this is doubly true for other modes of screening (virtual colonoscopy, CT scans, barium, etc.) Flat things are easier to miss that things that jump out at you. This really has not much to do with the scopes we have for IBD. I remembr when I was first tested for persistent D and bowel trouble at 19 . . . pre-colonoscopy. Had the traditional upper and lower GI series with barium, and of course it showed nothing. Left with a diagnosis of "you just have nervous bowels," which I lived with for another 14 years, until a massive GI bleed put me in the hospital and the scope the next day confirmed Crohns. So whatever drawbacks any medical technology may have, I'll opt for the most modern and useful one anyway. The simplty fact is that those scopes make diagnosis much easier and more likely,a nd save a lot of lives. Nothing is perfect.

CrohnieToo
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2003
Total Posts : 9448
   Posted 12/16/2008 7:05 PM (GMT -7)   
Good observations, Mike.
Some people are like Slinkies... Not really good for anything, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

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