Why do we know so little about Crohn's?

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brinycbri
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 64
   Posted 2/2/2009 11:16 AM (GMT -7)   
Why do we know so little about Crohn's?
 
I mean we still don't know if it's bacteria or anything. A lot of theories, but it suprises me that no body really cares on the scientific side except for some poorly funded programs. Is it that rare?

Nanners
Elite Member


Date Joined Apr 2005
Total Posts : 14995
   Posted 2/2/2009 12:02 PM (GMT -7)   
I think part of the problem is that we all present so differently. I also believe there are different types of Crohns. What might be a trigger for one, is not for another.

I am hoping the will find something with the stem cells to heal us, but I am not getting my hopes up too much. I have had this DD for over 30 years, and only thing thats changed is a few meds.
Gail*Nanners* Co-Moderator for Anxiety/Panic Forum
Been living with Crohn's Disease for 33 years. Currently on Asacol, Prilosec, Estrace, Prinivil, Diltiazem, Percoset prn for pain, Zofran, Phenergan, Probiotics, and Calcium and Xanax as needed. Resections in 2002 and 2005. Also diagnosed with Fibromyalgia and Osteoarthritis and Anxiety. Currently my Crohns is in remission.
*Every tomorrow has two handles.  We can take hold of it by the handle of anxiety, or by the handle of faith"*

pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20576
   Posted 2/2/2009 2:07 PM (GMT -7)   
More is known than what most realize...

Researchers believe the lack of a specific bacterium in the gut may be a cause of Crohn's disease.

A shortage of naturally-occurring bacteria is thought to trigger the inflammatory gastrointestinal disorder by over-stimulating the immune system.

Now a French team has highlighted the bug, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, which they show secretes biochemicals that reduce inflammation.

The study appears in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

CROHN'S DISEASE
Can affect any part of the gut
Most commonly affects the lower end of the small intestine - the ileum
Symptoms include, pain, ulcers and diarrhoea
Medication can relieve symptoms, but surgery to remove part of the gut may be required

The researchers, from the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, had already shown that patients with Crohn's disease have a marked deficiency in bacteria from the Clostridium leptum group.

Their latest work shows that F. prausnitzii - a major component of this group - accounts for a large part of the deficit.

Bowel surgery

The researchers found that Crohn's patients who underwent bowel surgery were more likely to experience a recurrence of the condition if they had low levels of F. prausnitzii.

And in experiments on cultured cells, they showed that liquid in which F. prausnitzii had been grown provided an anti-inflammatory effect.

The researchers said that if ongoing animal trials prove successful, human patients could benefit from a probiotic treatment with F. prausnitzii.

Dr Anton Emmanuel, medical director of the digestive disorders charity Core, called the study "exciting" and agreed it raised the possibility of a therapeutic "replacement" therapy.

"It would be interesting to see how this finding relates to the emerging body of evidence looking at genetic changes in some patients with Crohn's disease, with the known abnormal gene being one that codes for the body's ability to recognise foreign bacteria."

Dr John Bennett, chairman of Core, said there was growing evidence that micro-organisms combined with immunological weaknesses to either cause, or exacerbate Crohn's symptoms.

However, he said: "The gut contains a huge number and variety of organisms, and many of them have been investigated without any single one seeming to be entirely responsible."

Dr Bennett said scientists were testing the theory that harmful bacteria could be neutralised, or at least counter-acted, by preparations of beneficial "probiotic" micro-organisms, but as yet no definitive proof of their effect had been produced.

Professor Jonathan Rhodes, a consultant gastroenterologist from the Royal Liverpool Hospital, described the study as "interesting".

However, he said: "It is too early to tell whether this will lead directly to a new treatment as other probiotics have tended to produce good results in animal studies only to prove disappointing in clinical trial in Crohn's disease."

:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)


pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20576
   Posted 2/2/2009 2:09 PM (GMT -7)   
Gene Research and Crohn's
The first gene for conferring susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been identified.

Charles O. Elson, M.D., Chairperson of CCFA's National Scientific Advisory Committee (NSAC) and others, announced this break through on May 21 in Atlanta, Georgia, the site of Digestive Disease Week (DDW). A team of IBD researchers led by Drs. Judy Cho and Gabriel Nunez discovered the first gene that increases susceptibility for Crohn’s disease. Dr. Cho is assistant professor of medicine and a researcher in the Martin Boyer Laboratories at the University of Chicago. Dr. Gabrial Nunez is assistant professor of pathology at the University of Michigan. An independent research team in France, led by Drs. Jean-Pierre Hugot and Gilles Thomas, studying a different group of patients, has also identified the same gene, known as Nod2. Both teams published their findings in the May 31 issue of Nature, a prestigious journal. The researchers found a mutation in Nod2. A similar gene was known to help plants resist bacterial infection. This finding connects the disease with the innate immune system, the body's first line of defense against invading bacteria. Nod2 encodes a protein that helps the innate immune system recognize and respond to lipopolysaccharides (LPS), a component of some types of bacteria. In the mutated form of Nod2, about three percent of this protein is missing, which reduces the ability of Nod2 to recognize LPS and respond to bacterial invaders.

Other studies have suggested that a breach in this first line of defense triggers the inflammatory response in IBD, and the mutated form of Nod2 may be the link to other 'breaches' or weaknesses. "We have long suspected that both genetics and the environment played a role in inflammatory bowel disease," explains Dr. Cho. "This finally allows us to begin to understand how they work together to cause this disease."

:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)


brinycbri
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 64
   Posted 2/2/2009 2:26 PM (GMT -7)   
i wonder if this research will in turn create something usable

pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20576
   Posted 2/2/2009 3:59 PM (GMT -7)   
I'm sure it will, there is also a lot of research going on with stem cell therapy as well, so there are a few avenues being explored rest assured.

:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)


mtgman
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2005
Total Posts : 1289
   Posted 2/13/2009 8:25 AM (GMT -7)   
are there any supplements/products that contain Faecalibacterium prausnitzii?
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