Bodybuilding supplements, which is good and will not kill my stomach? THANKS!

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brinycbri
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 64
   Posted 3/2/2009 8:26 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi, I want to gain weight and get bigger. BUt I have a sensitive stomach like all of you. I found this great one, but then noticed that it has really high fiber, so that's out of the question. Here's my question:
 
1) Is glutamine good/bad for crohn's?
2) Which protein drink is easiest on stomach? (I think isopure because it's an isolate and clear with no lactose)
3) any suggestions on amino acids?
4) any other suggestion?
 
please help, thanks!

pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20576
   Posted 3/2/2009 8:49 AM (GMT -7)   
L Glutamine is suppose to be helpful with IBD, some use it strictly for that so it should be safe...be leary of creatine though (it's in many body buliding supplements) it can cause D. Generally for body building you want to bulk up (put on weight) so you could try something like "Mammoth 2500", it's a weight gain beverage mix with 50 g of prodtein per serving, it does contain some lactase, but if you take a good probiotic daily (which you really should with having an IBD) then one called Primadophilus Rueteri made by natures way actually aids with lactose intolerance issues (trust me, I was severe with my lactose intolerance but no longer have to use Lactaid products), it's helped me completely with my lactose issues.

You have to increase your food intake if you're looking to bulk up while lifting, that's why some use the Mammoth because it gives you an extra 2500 calories when you use it twice/day with whole milk.
 

The amino acid glutamine is the preferred fuel for small intestinal enterocytes and can decrease intestinal permeability, a potential benefit for Crohns Disease patients. Duodenal biopsies from healthy volunteers were cultured in the presence of the inflammatory cytokine-enhancing IL-1beta and increasing amounts of glutamine. Glutamine inhibited IL-1beta-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 (found to be high in the serum and mucosa of Crohn's Disease patients83) and IL-8, and enhanced production of the anti-inflammatory IL-10.247

Despite theoretical indications for glutamine supplementation in Crohn's Disease, several small intervention trials have not yielded benefit. In a double-blind study to determine if glutamine decreases gut permeability in Crohn’s disease, 14 Crohn's Disease patients were randomly assigned to receive 7 g glutamine or placebo (glycine) three times daily along with their conventional treatment. There were no significant changes in permeability during the four-week trial in either the glutamine or placebo groups. In addition, no significant changes were seen in CDAI, CRP, or plasma glutamine/ glutamate levels.248

Two studies investigating high-glutamine diets in children with Crohns Disease also found no significant benefit. Eighteen children received either a low-glutamine (4% of amino acid content) polymeric diet or a glutamine-enriched (42% of amino acid content) polymeric diet to determine whether glutamine enhances rate of remission. After four weeks, 5/9 in the low-glutamine group and 4/7 (two patients dropped out of this group due to diet intolerance) in the high-glutamine group achieved remission. Pediatric CDAI was significantly lower in the low-glutamine group, indicating greater response to the low- than high-glutamine diet.249 In a second arm of the study, glutamine did not affect intestinal permeability.250

Growth is often stunted by childhood Crohns Disease and low serum levels of insulin-like growth factor- 1 (IGF-1) have been implicated. In doubleblind fashion, 15 children with Crohn's Disease were assigned to receive one of two diets (same amino acid content as previous study) and the effect on IGF-1 assessed. No significant changes in IGF-1 were noted after four weeks of supplementation.251


:)


My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)


EMom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 990
   Posted 3/2/2009 9:08 AM (GMT -7)   
Tough questions. I'll take a stab.... smilewinkgrin

1) l-glutamine has been studied for its benefits for Crohn's. Seems to me what I read was positive, though I don't have any studies bookmarked to post for you.

2) Hard to say which protein drink is easiest on the stomach, I would just steer clear of soy-based ones. Many folks are sensitive to soy. I recently purchased a rice protein based one for my daughter. It had no lactose and no sugar or artificial sweeteners. Seemed like a good choice...

3) Eggs contain all eight essential amino acids including l-glutamine. Google and read about them! They've gotten a bad rap which they don't deserve, and there's nothing better than a natural source for your amino acids! Since my son began eating more eggs he really has put on muscle.

4) The 24 hour home-made yogurt put forth by the Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD) is a great source of protein, is lactose-free, and adds high-quality beneficial bacteria to your intestines, which everyone in the world needs--most of all anyone with intestinal issues! This is what my son uses for his "protein body-building drink" in the form of smoothies. He consumes about 2 cups of SCD yogurt every day (he's a competitive swimmer).

Good luck to you!
Mom to 16 year old son diagnosed in June, 2007.
Omega 3s, digestive enzymes, probiotics, vit. C, calcium w/D3, a good multivitamin and SCD legal yogurt
Started The Maker's Diet in Sept. '07. Incorporate Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD) recipes, too.


FitzyK23
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2005
Total Posts : 4219
   Posted 3/2/2009 3:28 PM (GMT -7)   
I like mix 1 drinks when I need a liquid meal. When I was working out to try to get into a police academy (pre-diagnosis but during symptoms) I was told that protein is really the most important. Instead of sugary drinks and bars I would just eat a can of tuna after working out. Sometimes I mixed it w/ mayo and relish, sometimes had it wrapped in lettuce, sometimes on toast, etc.

My husband (who has IBS and maybe IBD) found his stomach upset w/ Body Milk whey protein but he was drinking it in the morning. He thinks if he drank them in the evening he wouldn't have a problem. He had no problems w/ Creatine.
27 Year old married female law student (last year!!). Diagnosed w/ CD 4 years ago, IBS for over 10 years before that, which was probably the CD. I am sort of lactose intollerant too but can handle anything cultured and do well w/ lactose pills and lactaid. For crohns I am currently on Pentasa 4 pills/4x day and hysociamine prn. I also have bad acid reflux and have been on PPI's since age 13. I have been through prilosec, prevacid, and nexium. Currently I am on Protonix in the morning and Zantac at night. I also take a birth control pill to allow some fun in my life.


brinycbri
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 64
   Posted 3/2/2009 4:17 PM (GMT -7)   
Thanks for the heads up. I think might do isopure cuz it has the least amount of stuff in it (it's pure protein).

I just scared of using Glutamine because people say there are studies that show it might be harmful. Is this true?

Thanks!

CrazyHarry
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 1034
   Posted 3/2/2009 6:13 PM (GMT -7)   
most of the supplements are junk and are all fillers. you have to do a lot of research, and that does not mean using what some dude at the gym or behind a counter recommends.

supplementing with one amino acid imho is lame as there are 20+ depending on who you talk to. most of the peeps i've talked to who are big into body building dont recommend supplementing with one amino acid and they said they didnt notice any benefit from it (even l-glutamine). brached chain amino acids (bcca) is a better idea but even that is not conclusive.

dont do creatine with crohn's. it is already harsh on the stomach/digestive tract.

if you eat properly, eating a good combination of calorie dense and nutrient dense foods and have a good workout regime, you can put on plenty of size and not use supplements at all. the biggest key is calories. i dont care how much you work out and how clean your diet is, if you dont feed your body calories (ie carbs) you wont gain mass. that is my problem as i find i am healthier and can keep the crohns in check with a low grain (carb) diet, so i'm stuck at like 150 lbs but i am super cut.

most protein shakes are junk. just eat more chicken and fish and eggs if you want to increase your protein.

stay clear of bar foods, especially those with synthetic ingredients. all bar food should be treated as candy bars, however there are some good ones.

a good start for training is the 40-30-30 plan. 40% carbs, 30% protein and fat. if you want to gain weight faster and are really pushing yourself at the gym, then go 50% carbs, 30% protein and 20% fat.

cardio wont help you put on size. skip it unless you use it as a warm up imho.

remember, body building takes many months. be patient and most importantly, good form is way better than how much weight you can do.

get the book "muscles, speed and lies" by david lightsey. this will be a good start for you to educate yourself.

for workout tips and programs, check out t-nation.com
Crazy Harry

---------------------------------------------
Crohn's since 1993 (17 yrs old then)
surgery in July '05 - removal of 2 inches at ileum and 8 inches of sigmoid colon (had fistula into bladder)
Nov '05 developed colonic inertia; July '06 told i needed ostomy surgery
began maker's diet in August '06 - now feeling the best ever with no symptoms of colonic inertia and i kept my colon
med free as of 10/31/07


pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20576
   Posted 3/2/2009 8:51 PM (GMT -7)   
Yup, just a little too much creatine and it can cause D which is why it's best to avoid it all together, especially for IBDers.

:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)


snohare
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2004
Total Posts : 2088
   Posted 3/3/2009 4:08 AM (GMT -7)   
My understanding of glutamine is that it is slow to have an effect on the gut, because it is used up so rapidly by the brain/nervous system. Thus what a supplement is doing is only very gradually "topping up" gut levels back to where the gut will start to behave as it should do. That said, I may not have understood what I was being told correctly or forgotten bits, it was a good while ago.
I'm just about to go onto it myself, so this thread has been of great interest to me. (Always a joy to read pb's research fruits ! wink Very interesting.) Thanks for posting, brinycbri.
Crazy Harry, that precis was great ! yeah It really tells a non-gym fitness enthusiast like me all I need to know, except for one thing - where do I get fats from for the 40/30/30 diet if I cannot have dairy products ? At the moment, I think about the only fats I get are whatever is in various seeds and tinned fish; and I am pure skin and bone, with once-good muscles gradually dwindling. (I'm upping the protein already in the hopes of improving that.) My main concern here is that I have an old shoulder injury that seems to be getting worse, and I think that is because my body just isn't keeping up to scratch.

Margie11
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2008
Total Posts : 467
   Posted 3/3/2009 7:53 AM (GMT -7)   

Hey,
  wink The dame behind the counter here. IMHO, I have to agree that many if not most protein drinks and bars contain too much junk for Cronies like us. At the suggestion of a co worker dude (76 and still well cut) who chaired the bodybuilders group in our state,  I do take 5-10gr of glutamine (as a glutathione process aid, in theory)in 8oz of concord grape juice before long bike rides, and it seems I have less muscle ache when I over do it. I do this often, we have a great new trail system in our city, and I love it. Some of the G/I Docs at a local hospital use 15gr 3x daily for post surgery patients, and they seem to recover well.

   Some bars are OK, but I don't know of any that are high protein and tolerated well by IBDer, except a few by Garden of life or Living fuel, but they are totally not cost efficient and contain many seeds, so must be chewed, chewed, and chewed some more. The rest tend to be overrated candy bars.

   If I use a protein powder myself I use Bio-Chem, it is GF, lactose free and very easily absorbed. It was designed for IBDers and elderly persons. Many body builders use Designer Whey and it is good, if you can tolerate it well, but I think it has lactose.
I tell people to start with the plain or vanilla then add fat, sweeteners, fruit and calories This gives you control over what you put in your body (like 40/30/30), plus you can change up the flavors. Body Builders who shop with us use avocado for some good fats, and often add more protein in the form of Egg White protein. I still like whole eggs, we eat way more than one a day here and with no cholesterol issues, even for my 400lb husband who is diabetic.   Bananas for fiber and flavor are good. Some use just protein powder, frozen concentrated. OJ and some water or apple juice with ice in the blender for an creamy orange slush. I can't say enough about berries and red fruit for general health, and many add Acai puree.



  Never go faster than your guardian angel can fly! Be Patient And Tough, Someday This Pain Will Be Useful To You I get by with a lotta help from my friends!    
 Crohn's DG 2003 , symptoms included terrible joint and soft tissue pain, just met first cousin who suffers from Reactive Arthritis-explains sooo much. Followed SCD Strictly 2003-06, then modified by adding new things 10-12 days apart to avoid delayed reactions in the form of arthritis symptoms. Scope on 2-5-09 was great! Doc says no symptoms,No scope for 10 years!!!
                                                                                    Margie11

Post Edited (Margie11) : 3/3/2009 8:33:24 PM (GMT-7)


pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20576
   Posted 3/3/2009 11:24 AM (GMT -7)   
Glutamine helps to protect the lining of the gastrointestinal tract known as the mucosa. Because of this, some experts speculate that glutamine deficiency may play a role in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), namely ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. These conditions are characterized by damage to the lining of the small or large intestines, which leads to inflammation, infection, and ulcerations (holes). In fact, some preliminary clinical research suggests that glutamine may be a valuable supplement during treatment of IBD because it promotes healing of the cells in the intestines and improves diarrhea associated with IBD. Not all clinical studies have found this positive benefit, however. For this reason, more research is needed before conclusions can be drawn. In the meantime, follow the advice of your health care provider when deciding whether to use glutamine for IBD.

:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)


FitzyK23
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2005
Total Posts : 4219
   Posted 3/3/2009 4:15 PM (GMT -7)   
Hey Kasper, not judging, just truly curious, is it healthy to gain that much weight that fast? Could it strain your heart or your joints?
27 Year old married female law student (last year!!). Diagnosed w/ CD 4 years ago, IBS for over 10 years before that, which was probably the CD. I am sort of lactose intollerant too but can handle anything cultured and do well w/ lactose pills and lactaid. For crohns I am currently on Pentasa 4 pills/4x day and hysociamine prn. I also have bad acid reflux and have been on PPI's since age 13. I have been through prilosec, prevacid, and nexium. Currently I am on Protonix in the morning and Zantac at night. I also take a birth control pill to allow some fun in my life.


CrazyHarry
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 1034
   Posted 3/3/2009 8:25 PM (GMT -7)   
kasper -
it is physically impossible to gain that much muscle mass in 2 months. you can gain that kind of weight, but it wont be all muscle. you need to increase your carb intake to put on mass more than your protein intake. calories is key and you need energy calories which are from carbs, specifically grain based carbs. but try your way first and let me know how it goes. if you dont get the results you wanted, then try increasing your carb intake and see if that gets you the results you desire.


snohare -
good fats are from nuts and nut butters, coconut oil, real butter, red meat (grass fed), cold water fish, olive oil, omega 3 supplement, avocados. the fat in chicken is in the skin. you should be ok eating the skin of organic chicken. if you can do dairy, do kefir, yogurt, and cheese from goat and sheep sources. raw is best.
Crazy Harry

---------------------------------------------
Crohn's since 1993 (17 yrs old then)
surgery in July '05 - removal of 2 inches at ileum and 8 inches of sigmoid colon (had fistula into bladder)
Nov '05 developed colonic inertia; July '06 told i needed ostomy surgery
began maker's diet in August '06 - now feeling the best ever with no symptoms of colonic inertia and i kept my colon
med free as of 10/31/07


pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20576
   Posted 3/3/2009 9:17 PM (GMT -7)   
Kasper did specify that most of that 20-25 lbs would be water weight, not muscle mass.


:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)

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