anybody had crohns in gallbladder?

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Bible
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2007
Total Posts : 188
   Posted 3/21/2009 7:03 PM (GMT -7)   
Crohns in Gall bladder? and whatisCizmia?

spookyh
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 1342
   Posted 3/21/2009 7:37 PM (GMT -7)   
I had my gallbladder removed, but don't know if crohn's was the reason it was full of stones.

Cimzia is a biologic, kind of like Humira and Remicade.

Miss J
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2009
Total Posts : 27
   Posted 3/22/2009 10:06 AM (GMT -7)   
I had my gallbladder removed when I was 16. The surgeon noted that there were no stones, but rather it was "significantly enlarged and moderately inflamed". For whatever reason, he didn't send it to pathology, but your question has me wondering if it was due to Crohn's.

Chasity102304
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2007
Total Posts : 165
   Posted 3/22/2009 6:06 PM (GMT -7)   
I am having my gall bladder taken out due to gall bladder disease. My surgery consult is 3/31. I don't think you can have crohn's IN the gall bladder but I did read while researching online that people with crohn's have a higher % of getting gall bladder disease/stones. I'm going to ask my surgeon when I see him if crohn's "caused" the disease or how it's related.
Fibromyalgia DX March 2003
Crohn's DX Jan 2006 (Symptoms since 96-Misdiagnosed as "female" problems-Major flare during pregnancy in 05 which lead to DX)
1st resection July 2007
Currently on Remicade/8 weeks


Bible
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2007
Total Posts : 188
   Posted 3/22/2009 9:15 PM (GMT -7)   
Please ask you doc and let me know-  When I was told yesterday that I had gallbladder diseae I asked if that was serious and he said yeah crohns is serious-so i wasassuming taht it was crohns in the gallbladder  Idon't know....

Blossom
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 176
   Posted 3/22/2009 10:24 PM (GMT -7)   

Hi,

Sorry to hear about your gallbladder problems.  Crohn's occurs in the gastrointestinal tract, anywhere from the mouth to the anus (e.g. mouth, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, rectum, anus).  The gallbladder is not part of the gastrointestinal tract.

Good luck to you, and hope you feel better soon.

 


54 year old female;
 
Have had Crohn's of terminal ileum for over 9 yrs, but finally accepted diagnosis when it was confirmed Feb. 2008.
 
Allergic/hypersensitivity to Pentasa, Entocort, and 6-MP.  Recently started Humira in December.


pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20576
   Posted 3/22/2009 10:41 PM (GMT -7)   
The main function of the gall bladder is to store the bile it receives from the liver at an increased concentration than it was received. It successfully stores anywhere from 35 milliliters to about 50 milliliters; the amounts determined and restricted via the sphincter valve at the neck of the gall bladder. The inner layer of the gall bladder, the mucosa layer, is very similar to the inner mucosa layer of the stomach, containing folds within the mucosa. This permits expansion, just like the stomach, however, the gall bladder is expanding with bile rather than food. Fully expanded, the gall bladder resembles a pear.

Bile is the digestive fluid which is made up of mostly bile salts with a yellow-green appearance. Bile also contains biliruben, cholesterol, and a few additional compounds. Biliruben is the product that is left after food is broken down into its molecular structure.


The muscularis is able to eject bile somewhat forcefully with a simple contraction of the muscular tissue. The liver is in constant production of bile, which then of course drains into the hepatic duct to the common bile duct until it finally reaches the duodenum. The gall bladder receives extra bile for storage when the small intestine is devoid of food remnants. In this case, the sphincter muscle (sphincter of ampulla) contracts rapidly to force the remaining bile back into the gall bladder.

The blood supply to the gall bladder is received via the cystic artery, a branch of the right hepatic artery. Venous return happens via the cystic vein, which then joins the hepatic portal vein. The gall bladder and the liver are innervated almost identically. Sympathetic innervation is received via the thoracolumnar nerves through the celiac ganglia. Parasympathetic innervation happens via the vagus nerve.

Some people with crohn's have had gallbladder fistulas...In some cases, the inflamed gallbladder adheres to and perforates nearby organs, such as the small intestine. In such cases a fistula (channel) between the organs develops. Sometimes, in these cases, gallstones can actually pass into the small intestine, which can be very serious and requires immediate surgery.

:)


My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)

Post Edited (pb4) : 3/22/2009 11:45:35 PM (GMT-6)


Blossom
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 176
   Posted 3/22/2009 11:20 PM (GMT -7)   
Wow, pb4!  The info you provided is quite impressive.  Have you studied medicine?

54 year old female;
 
Have had Crohn's of terminal ileum for over 9 yrs, but finally accepted diagnosis when it was confirmed Feb. 2008.
 
Allergic/hypersensitivity to Pentasa, Entocort, and 6-MP.  Recently started Humira in December.


pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20576
   Posted 3/23/2009 11:15 AM (GMT -7)   
LOL, thanks Blossom but no I haven't studies medicine, I'm just good at googling info is all LOL.

:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)


MikeB
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 1169
   Posted 3/23/2009 11:36 AM (GMT -7)   
I think it's more likely that you have standard gall bladder disease (either from stones or inflammation) which is more common in women and especially in Crohns patients. It probably doesn;t make much difference -- the treatment in either case is to remove it.

Kittikatt
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 422
   Posted 3/23/2009 11:48 AM (GMT -7)   

Bible, I would have to say NO to Crohn's being in the gall bladder but Crohn's can certainly be the CAUSE of problems with the gall bladder.

My situation is a good example.  Last year I was in a major Crohn's flare from January - August.  I dropped 40 pounds within the first 2 months last year (170 to 130 lbs).  As I FINALLY started to feel better in August, I (of course) THEN started having this light burning/gnawing/aching pain in the middle of my breastbone.  I thought it was a stomach ulcer starting up.  It was really just an annoyance at first.  The aching was light and only last for about 30 minutes, then I'd forget about it.  And I didn't have it every day.  I might go 3 days or 2 weeks without the pain.  But by December the pain was lasting longer and coming on more often.  So I mentioned it to my GI.  He didn't think much of it and told me to pop another Prilosec/day.

By January of this year though, the pain was coming every day for at least 3-6 hours.  The pain made me CRY.  It made me lethargic; it made me not want to eat.  I've dropped another 10 pounds since January because the pain was so overwhelming I just couldn't function well enough to eat or drink...not to mention food would set off my bowels.  I was starting to have major, painful intestinal gas and I was throwing up with my bowel movements from the gas pain even more often than normal.  2 weeks into January, I called my GI and RE-told him the same thing I'd told him a month before, except that the pain and situation was worse. 

At that time he scheduled an Upper Endoscopy and Gall Bladder Ultrasound.  Luckily I was able to get in for the GB Ultrasound that same day.  I was certain I didn't have gall stones...but 5 minutes into the ultrasound, the Tech said, "Hey look!  You DO have gall stones!"  Drat.

Since that diagnosis, I've done some Googling and found out gall stones can be caused by rapid weight loss.  I dropped weight fast during my flare last year which is PROBABLY the reason I ended up with gall stones...and I dropped weight fast because of my Crohn's Disease.

So to me, that is how Crohn's CAN affect the gall bladder. I'm sure Crohn's can affect the gall bladder in other ways, too.  My uncle is a doctor/surgeon and he says if someone has gall bladder problems (particularly stones that can block the bile duct) and on top of that also has Crohn's Disease, the gall bladder MUST come out.  Otherwise, a sick gall bladder can cause major infections in people with GOOD immune systems and since Crohn's patients' immune systems SUCK, we need to get rid of the gall bladder if there's a problem with it.

The Upper Endoscopy has been cancelled and my gall bladder is being removed 2 weeks from today.  smilewinkgrin


Diagnosed in October, 2004 at age 32.
37/F/SC
Current Rx's: Colazal (generic), Omeprazole, Ferrous Sulfate, Librax, One-A-Day multivitamin, Probiotic, Omega-3 Fish Oil, Vitamin D, Vitamin A, Calcium-Magnesium-Zinc, Cranberry pills
Secondary conditions: mouth ulcers, joint pain, swelling ankles, extreme fatigue
Previous/occasional Rx's: 20mg Prednisone taper, Flagyl, Levaquin
No surgeries to date

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