Crohns Disease vs. Crohns Colitus

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Anniegetyour gun
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2009
Total Posts : 20
   Posted 3/26/2009 4:27 AM (GMT -7)   
Sorry 2nd question (as an after thought) for the day.
 
What exactly is the difference between a diagnosis of Crohns Disease and Crohns Colitus?

Thanks blush
Concerned and loving Mom


Kittikatt
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 422
   Posted 3/26/2009 5:21 AM (GMT -7)   
I have Crohn's Colitis.

Colitis is simply inflammation in the LARGE intestine. So if you've been diagnosed with Crohn's Disease but the disease is (currently) only affecting your large intestine, you have Crohn's Colitis.
Diagnosed in October, 2004 at age 32.
37/F/SC
Current Rx's: Colazal (generic), Omeprazole, Ferrous Sulfate, Librax, One-A-Day multivitamin, Probiotic, Omega-3 Fish Oil, Vitamin D, Vitamin A, Calcium-Magnesium-Zinc, Cranberry pills
Secondary conditions: mouth ulcers, joint pain, swelling ankles, extreme fatigue
Previous/occasional Rx's: 20mg Prednisone taper, Flagyl, Levaquin
No surgeries to date


MMMNAVY
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 6927
   Posted 3/26/2009 7:28 AM (GMT -7)   
there is no difference, like kittikatt said when someone has inflammation in their colon due to crohns disease it is called crohns colitis.
Forum Co-moderator - Crohn's Disease:_All comments have the caveat contact your local health care provider.

I will find a way or make one. –Phillip Sidney 1554-1586

All that I am and all that I shall ever be, I owe to my Angel Mother.

The Bucket List- Have you found joy in your life?  Has your life brought joy to others?

Make sure your suffering has meaning…


pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20576
   Posted 3/26/2009 11:53 AM (GMT -7)   
I too have crohn's colitis (which is simply CD affecting the colon...col=colon and itis=inflammation....crohn's colitis is just the term used for when crohn's is affecting the colon.

There are five subtypes of Crohn's disease, distinguished by the gastrointestinal area in which the disease occurs. While Crohn's disease lesions can appear anywhere in the digestive tract, lesions rarely occur in the mouth, esophagus, and stomach unless there are also lesions in the lower parts of the tract (intestines).

Gastroduodenal CD - Gastroduodenal Crohn's disease, which affects the stomach and the duodenum (the highest, or beginning, portion of the small intestine), is often misdiagnosed as ulcer disease. The correct diagnosis frequently is not made until various ulcer treatments have failed, or until Crohn's disease is identified farther down the gastrointestinal tract. Symptoms of gastroduodenal CD include loss of appetite, weight loss, nausea, pain in the upper middle of the abdomen, and vomiting.

Jejunoileitis - Jejunoileitis is Crohn's disease of the jejunum (the longest portion of the small intestine), which is located between the duodenum and the ileum. Symptoms include mild to intense abdominal pain and cramps after meals, diarrhea, and malnutrition caused by malabsorption of nutrients. (The majority of nutrients are absorbed in the jejunum.) Fistulas (abnormal openings in the intestinal tract) may form. These can link a diseased area of the small intestine to another area of the intestine or another organ, such as the bladder. Fistulas may increase the risk of developing infections outside of the GI tract.

Ileitis - Ileitis affects the ileum (the lowest, or last, part of the small intestine). Symptoms include diarrhea and cramping or pain in the right lower quadrant and periumbilical (around the bellybutton) area, especially after meals. Malabsorption of vitamin B12 can lead to tingling in the fingers or toes (peripheral neuropathy). Folate deficiency can hinder the development of red blood cells, putting the patient at higher risk of developing anemia. Fistulas can develop, as can inflammatory masses.

Ileocolitis - Ileocolitis is the most common type of Crohn's disease. It affects the ileum (the lowest part of the small intestine) and the colon (the large intestine). Often, the diseased area of the colon is continuous with the diseased ileum, and therefore involves the ileocecal valve between the ileum and the colon. In some cases, however, areas of the colon not contiguous with the ileum are involved. Symptoms of ileocolitis are essentially the same as those present in ileitis. Weight loss is also common.

Crohn's Colitis (Granulomatous Colitis ) - Crohn's colitis affects the colon. It is distinguished from ulcerative colitis in two ways. First, there are often areas of healthy tissue between areas of diseased tissue; ulcerative colitis is always continuous. Second, while ulcerative colitis always affects the rectum and areas of the colon beyond the rectum, Crohn's colitis can spare the rectum, appearing only in the colon.

:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)


Homeboy
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 637
   Posted 3/27/2009 11:12 AM (GMT -7)   
Pb4;

This is a very informative post.

TY

smilewinkgrin
CD dx @ 13 (1987)
Prednisone 8mg every other day
Imuran 100mg day -- Stoppped March 09
Celexa 20mg day
Pain Meds -- Morphine Sulfate
Vitamins + B12 Injections Once Per Week
Gallbladder Resection -- 3/19/09 -- Fingers crossed


pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20576
   Posted 3/27/2009 12:15 PM (GMT -7)   
Glad you enjoyed it, crohn's can get very confusing especially for newbies and especially it seems when it comes to crohn's colitis, alot of people think crohn's colitis means they have both ulcerative colitis and crohn's when infact they don't, but I blame alot of docs for that because they aren't clear/specific enough when they tell a crohnie they have "colitis" and they assume the patient knows he/she means they have crohn's colitis not UC and CD.

:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)

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