results of leaky gut test after taking LDN

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njmom
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Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 1884
   Posted 10/30/2009 7:49 AM (GMT -7)   
My daughter has been on 4.5 mg LDN for several months, along with 3 mg Entocort (one pill). Before she started the LDN, we had a "leaky gut" (intestinal permeability) test done by Genova Diagnostics. It tested positive for a leaky gut.
 
Later, she took the "leaky gut" test after having been on LDN for some time. It tested negative - no leaky gut. 

MoobyDoo
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2009
Total Posts : 212
   Posted 10/30/2009 8:58 AM (GMT -7)   
That's really interesting news. I've long suspected my daughter has a leaky gut too.  In addition to Crohn's, lots of allergies, etc.  How is the Crohn's responding to the LDN in your daughter?

  • njmom
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    Date Joined Apr 2006
    Total Posts : 1884
       Posted 10/30/2009 10:41 AM (GMT -7)   

    Both the sed rate and CRP have been lowered since the introduction of LDN. That, along with the leaky gut test, indicate an improved condition.

    Of course, when she goes off the Entocort, we will keep checking labs to make sure the CRP and sed rate don't start going up.

    We can't go by symptoms because she doesn't have any.

    Btw, one 2001 article suggested zinc can play a role in helping a leaky gut. She did test deficient in zinc. However, when we try to supplement with zinc then her iron goes down. If we try to up the iron the zinc goes down. ANd this happens even if she takes iron and zinc hours apart. I've checked all the journals and we seem to be in the dark ages when it comes to knowing how and when to take supplements. It's all trial and error.    

     


    Keeper
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    Date Joined Jun 2008
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       Posted 10/30/2009 2:11 PM (GMT -7)   
    Both zinc and iron use the same pathway for absorption, so they will compete. Also, Ferrous iron causes oxidative stress or inflammation which has the effect of causing a reduction of the absorption process. One article that I read suggested using Ferric iron (+3 state) instead of Ferrous iron as a supplement. This avoids the oxidative stress problem, but it is hard to find Ferric salts as a supplement. Another option is to use heme iron supplements. It is absorbed by a different pathway and does not cause inflammation. For a bit more info, see: http://www.proferrin.ca/heme.htm

    njmom
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    Date Joined Apr 2006
    Total Posts : 1884
       Posted 10/30/2009 4:38 PM (GMT -7)   

    Keeper, agreed that iron and zinc compete, which is why my daughter takes them hours apart. The ratio of iron to zinc matters, too, even when taken hours apart.

    Thanks for the proferrin link - am checking it out. Seems to have a handy chart.


    Keeper
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    Date Joined Jun 2008
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       Posted 10/31/2009 10:40 PM (GMT -7)   
    The body does not have a process that eliminates iron. Iron levels are normally controlled by controlling absorption. The absorption of iron is also limited when there is inflammation as well because the iron is pro-inflammatory as a result of the production of hydroxyl radicals by the iron. To limit further oxidation and inflammation, the body damps down the absorption of iron. I'm guessing, but since iron and zinc share the same absorption pathway, it may be that this also limits zinc absorption as well (and copper and calcium maybe). Taking ferrous iron supplements - in whatever form - causes a certain amount of damage to the tissue where it lands, and this could cause inflammation that prevents the desired iron absorption.

    For details regarding this problem, see: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1755-8794/2/2/

    njmom
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    Date Joined Apr 2006
    Total Posts : 1884
       Posted 11/1/2009 5:26 PM (GMT -7)   
    Keeper, my daughter is not iron-deficient because of inflammation or because of any syndrome such as the anemia of cronic disease syndrom. She is iron-deficient because it runs in the family, as long as women are still in their menstrual years. My mom, myself, and my daughter. The supplements she is on keep my daughter from slipping into anemia.
     
    Juicy article, thx. Interesting that insulin resistance and ferritin are linked.
     
    Not sure you are right about iron causing damage wherever "it lands" - it seems an oversimplification of what the article says. My daughter takes ferrous bisglycinate which is chelated to avoid causing inflammation.
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