SPECIAL REPORT: Are doctors what ails U.S. healthcare?

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NostraHistoria
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 351
   Posted 11/6/2009 5:53 AM (GMT -7)   
www.reuters.com/article/topNews/idUSTRE5A50EB20091106

I wish I could staple this article to the forehead of my old jerk GI.
27m - Dx January 2005: UC/Crohn's
Humira, Entocort 9 mg, Asacol 4 x 3, Flagyl 250 mg x 3


Christine1946
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2008
Total Posts : 5854
   Posted 11/6/2009 5:59 AM (GMT -7)   
     I have to leave for a blood test in a few minutes and didn't get the chance to check this out...but yes, doctors ARE what is wrong with US healthcare..lol.
 
Diagnosed with ulcerative proctitis in 1998 in hospital
Hospitalized (2nd time) in May 2008 for ten days.
Remission Nov 08 thru May of 09.
Slowly coming out of flare.  Meds: Colazal (6 per day), prednisone 10 mgm and tapering weekly, Cort enema nightly, Canasa in morning, Benicar 20 mg for BP, flaxseed oil 3 x a day, fishoil 2 x a day, probiotic 3 x a day, calcium with D 1x a day and multivitamin.
Doctor had me on 100 mgm of 6MP which drastically lowered my white count.  Now off the 6MP pending results of repeat white count. UGH.


NostraHistoria
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 351
   Posted 11/6/2009 6:07 AM (GMT -7)   
Christine1946 said...
I have to leave for a blood test in a few minutes and didn't get the chance to check this out...but yes, doctors ARE what is wrong with US healthcare..lol.


My old bad doc is really, really going to regret treating me badly. Do not want to say why...
27m - Dx January 2005: UC/Crohn's
Humira, Entocort 9 mg, Asacol 4 x 3, Flagyl 250 mg x 3


CrohnieToo
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Date Joined May 2003
Total Posts : 9448
   Posted 11/6/2009 7:59 AM (GMT -7)   
The real problem w/health care costs in this country are the same problem w/costs thru out this country. The ratio between the average American's income and the income at the top levels is seriously out of balance w/every other industrialized country. Too many at the top of any industry in this country receive compensation totally out of balance w/their contribution to the success of that industry. This is true from agriculture to health care to Wall Street and the financial industry.
 
15-20 years ago one of the weekly news magazines ran a comparison of the ratio between US union workers (usually the highest paid hourly workers) and upper level management w/that of several other industrialized countries (i.e. Germany, France, Japan, etc.) and the differences between the US and the other countries was staggering w/the US way out of line w/the other countries.
 
When 1% of the population CONTROLS 90% of the wealth of a country it sounds like a third world country - but it isn't, it is the USA!!


Some people are like Slinkies... Not really good for anything, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

Post Edited (CrohnieToo) : 11/6/2009 8:04:32 AM (GMT-7)


GDen
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Date Joined May 2009
Total Posts : 703
   Posted 11/6/2009 3:25 PM (GMT -7)   
That article reads like a propaganda piece. Bakersville is pretty rural. In my large city, any hospital has great resources to treat anybody. The article also completely fails to mention (much like the current healthcare legislation) tort reform. LAWYERS drive up healthcare costs with multimillion dollar lawsuits.

jeanneac
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Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 1812
   Posted 11/6/2009 9:19 PM (GMT -7)   
Well, if hospitals wouldn't take off the wrong leg and other body parts, maybe they wouldn't get sued. Granted there are some silly lawsuits and those should be stopped but anybody who thinks LAWYERS are the problem in healthcare are being misled by partisal politics.
The insurance companies are getting their share too. And the few that are insured are paying for the healthcare of the many who are not insured. You don't see too many hospitals or insurance companies going under, do you? Many of the hospitals look like lobbies of five star hotels. Who pays for this? I think we know. 2/3 of most bankruptcy cases in the US are from health care bills. We need universal care so everyone pays for it and the middle class doesn't get stuck with a disproportionate share of all this. The middle class can't carry it anymore and the economy will never fully recover unless we fix this. Ask other on this forum how they feel about their health care in the UK and other countries. We had a discussion about this a while back. You don't see them loosing their homes due to health care costs.
diagnosed 1/09 with "diverticular colitis" ?? location: sigmoid colon
localized scleroderma & IBS, low thyroid,claritin, advair, singulair, benicar
 50 +  female
 colazal, fish oil, synthroid, zoloft, wellbutrin, VSL#3 probiotic.
Blood test positive for Crohn's via prometheus ibd serology panel
 


pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20576
   Posted 11/6/2009 11:20 PM (GMT -7)   
Speaking from a Canadians stand point, in Alberta our healthcare was great (started up in the 1960's) but when you start getting over-protective moms and hypocondriacts running to the doctors/hospitals over every little thing, that certainly will have a negative impact over-all especially over the decades...it's patients like that playing a huge role in overwhelming the health care systems...it's not just from one source but instead a combination of sources that can ruin a good healthcare system.

It's also much harder to sue in Canada than it is in the US.

:)
bee propolis caps 500mg one cap twice/day
omegas 369 caps one cap twice/day
probiotics 10 billion cfu once/day
vitamins C-calcium ascorbate (easy on the gut) and vitamin A each once/day
Prodiem fibre supplement one cap before bed
I've also altered my diet (no junky stuff at all, processed, fast-foods, refined sugars, ect) and exercise regularly.
I went from 30+ bloody BM's/day with lots of lower back pain to an average of 5/day no bleeding no back pain and completely formed stools, still have severe urgency issues.
~~~~~~~~My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)~~~~~~~~


Keeper
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2008
Total Posts : 1058
   Posted 11/6/2009 11:59 PM (GMT -7)   
I recently saw a documentary that said that billing fraud was costing the Medicare system $800 billion annually because of lax policing and the easy (illegal) availability of personal health info and the ease of setting up a medical supplies business billing account with Medicare. They interviewed one guy who had been caught and he said that he had billed for $20 million worth of stuff himself. He also said (not exactly a reliable source) that there were 2000 businesses like the one he was running in south Florida and 90% of them were frauds. Using his billings as a guide, that's $36 billion in fraud in south Florida alone.....

medchrt1
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2005
Total Posts : 517
   Posted 11/7/2009 12:11 AM (GMT -7)   
I am an engineer, and only have have a crude understanding of the (usa) "iron triangle",,i.e.,,that to influence gov't at least one point of the iron triangle must be influenced,, so to make change,, something in 'your' view must inevitably involve/influence a part of the iron triangle in order to have change.

GDen
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2009
Total Posts : 703
   Posted 11/7/2009 12:41 AM (GMT -7)   
No thanks on universal healthcare. I don't want to wait 3 months to see a doctor. People in the UK et al. don't lose their homes due to medical bills, they lose their lives because they degraded so much waiting to see doctors for so long.

Texas passed tort reform. As a result, doctors' malpractice insurance on average dropped from $60K to $3K per year. Who do you think paid those high premiums? Yeah, that's right. Lawyers make way too much suing doctors for any old thing. Lawyers like BILLIONAIRE trial lawyer Dickie Scruggs (who's currently in jail btw). Besides high premiums, doctors order any and every test to CTA. And the current house healthcare bill punishes any states that pass tort reform. You're welcome trial lawyers!

tsitodawg
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 845
   Posted 11/7/2009 2:50 AM (GMT -7)   
To see a good specialist I have to usually wait anywhere from a month to 3 months, so if I can get it less expensive and everyone is covered I am all for it. The only way that a person can get a same day appointment is if you go to the E.R. or an instacare. Even my primary care physician takes 2-3 weeks to get in with if I just call and schedule. The only way I can get in quicker is if I call in with urgent symptoms and then you usually have to deal with a nurse or nurse practitioner. I have great insurance compared to most but every year my premiums go up or my max. out of pocket is raised. This year my premium only went up 3 dollars but my max out of pocket went from $2,000 a person to $3,000 and my deductible went from $100 to $500. I am all for a public option just to make the healthcare companies compete with competitive prices. just 6 years ago my premium for my wife and I was $50 a month with a $100 deductible. Now we pay $250 a month for the 2 of us. That is a lot when you make $13/ hour with a college degree.

CrohnieToo
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2003
Total Posts : 9448
   Posted 11/7/2009 6:52 AM (GMT -7)   
And now we have "facility fees" tacked on to our office calls and procedures, etc. Well, not all of them - yet.
 
See my post "Our Medical Fees Aren't High Enough??" What a RACKET health care in this country has become.


Some people are like Slinkies... Not really good for anything, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.


dinkydee
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2009
Total Posts : 201
   Posted 11/7/2009 8:37 AM (GMT -7)   
Could those with Universal healthcare please give us in the USA an idea what it is like for you, the honest pros and cons please......
 
about 15 years ago my primary care physician spent part of my visit time complaining to me about what HMO's were doing to healthcare.  He encouraged me if I ever had a choice, to sign up for the traditional 20-80 plan. (remember those days? small deductible, insur. paid 80 percent, we paid 20, and we filed our own claims?)  Well, at the time I did have an option, but by then it would have cost me most of my paycheck.....but I remember the first time I signed up for an HMO plan, (I think Prucare) I thought it was great, cheaper, and $10 copays....and my doctor was on the approved doctor list.....
 
Another thing, I'm a nurse and I'm a manager....so I know what we pay our physical therapists, occupational therapists, etc...and my daughter is a nurse, she makes up to $50 an hour with shift diff, etc.  and the hospital pays the nurses bonuses occationally when the census is high!!!  This is crazy, seeing the insurance companies and medicare reimburse just over what we pay out for our therapists.....when you add in billing cost, benefits, corp. support....on and on.
It is all out of control! 
 
So again  I'd like some feedback from those that now have universal healthcare.  B/c we sure need help here!
Diagnosed with CD 3 years ago.  Refused to take meds until recently started Colazal. 
 Currently on Prednisone 40mg. Tapering down, now on 20mg.
Colazal 3xday, Antioxidant strips
 
I live by faith and not by sight....


CrohnieToo
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2003
Total Posts : 9448
   Posted 11/7/2009 9:17 AM (GMT -7)   
At least the nurses, therapists, doctors, etc. are providing actual hands-on care! I don't begrudge them their pay. Its the sheister SOBs at the top levels of management who don't contribute one single bit of hands-on care but suck off salary and benefits and perks that are obscene that I RESENT!!!
Some people are like Slinkies... Not really good for anything, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.


Christine1946
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2008
Total Posts : 5854
   Posted 11/7/2009 9:28 AM (GMT -7)   
     Maybe we should go back to bartering.  With so many people out of work, it wouldn't be such a bad idea.
 
Diagnosed with ulcerative proctitis in 1998 in hospital
Hospitalized (2nd time) in May 2008 for ten days.
Remission Nov 08 thru May of 09.
Slowly coming out of flare.  Meds: Colazal (6 per day), prednisone 10 mgm and tapering weekly, Cort enema nightly, Canasa in morning, Benicar 20 mg for BP, flaxseed oil 3 x a day, fishoil 2 x a day, probiotic 3 x a day, calcium with D 1x a day and multivitamin.
Doctor had me on 100 mgm of 6MP which drastically lowered my white count.  Now off the 6MP pending results of repeat white count. UGH.


dinkydee
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2009
Total Posts : 201
   Posted 11/7/2009 1:22 PM (GMT -7)   
I agree ChronieToo, however, I think they (we) even get paid too much....most people wouldn't say that, but a nurse, PT, OT should not be paid $50 an hour and get bonuses based on filling the beds. Esp. not the care I recently rec'd while I was in the hospital! There is too much money being made in healthcare, and I agree esp. the CEO's. Have no idea what the answer is, but still wondering what those with universal healthcare think.....do they still rec. quality and prompt care?
Diagnosed with CD 3 years ago.  Refused to take meds until recently started Colazal. 
 Currently on Prednisone 40mg. Tapering down, now on 20mg.
Colazal 3xday, Antioxidant strips
 
I live by faith and not by sight....


pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20576
   Posted 11/7/2009 2:00 PM (GMT -7)   
Here in Canada (specifically Alberta) where I live it just seems to vary, some people get in right away and some people don't (speaking about pulic health care not private, I don't know how it works with private cuz I use public) but my daughter has been having gut issues, she got in to have a consultation with a GI in about 2 weeks from the phone call made, she had a scope 2 weeks after that, that's still not bad but it's not as quick as it was for me 18 yrs ago when I saw my GI the very next day after a phone call in, and I saw him for a consult and he scoped me all in the same visit. So things have definintely changed but there not as bad as what I saw it's like in the US (and some other places) according to that Michael Moore film "sicko".

:)
bee propolis caps 500mg one cap twice/day
omegas 369 caps one cap twice/day
probiotics 10 billion cfu once/day
vitamins C-calcium ascorbate (easy on the gut) and vitamin A each once/day
Prodiem fibre supplement one cap before bed
I've also altered my diet (no junky stuff at all, processed, fast-foods, refined sugars, ect) and exercise regularly.
I went from 30+ bloody BM's/day with lots of lower back pain to an average of 5/day no bleeding no back pain and completely formed stools, still have severe urgency issues.
~~~~~~~~My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)~~~~~~~~


GDen
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2009
Total Posts : 703
   Posted 11/7/2009 2:33 PM (GMT -7)   
tsitodawg said...
I am all for a public option just to make the healthcare companies compete with competitive prices.

That's not competing at all when the public option can and will be subsidized by taxpayers. Then the gov't can undercut private insurance companies, driving them out of business. Then everybody will be left with ONLY ONE option and have to pay whatever they charge (via premiums AND taxes) and accept whatever they cover.

BTW, there's a provision in the healthcare bill that punishes anybody who doesn't buy health insurance with up to $250,000 in fines and up to five years in prison.

CrohnieToo
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2003
Total Posts : 9448
   Posted 11/7/2009 2:34 PM (GMT -7)   
Well, understand that Michael Moore tends to exaggerate when making his films.

Heck, I have good insurance coverage but my gastro is so busy doing procedures and only in the office one day a week for the six month "well visits" I have a heck of a lot longer wait than 2 weeks to get in and I'm an established patient!!! I just go in to my family doctor when the Crohn's get active, he can refer me over for an office visit, scope or whatever but he starts treating me NOW!
Some people are like Slinkies... Not really good for anything, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.


MMMNAVY
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 6927
   Posted 11/7/2009 3:22 PM (GMT -7)   
I think people forget that we do have a government run healthcare program in the United States. The VA hospital's vary alot in their care. Granted it is better then nothing, and there are some good ones and there are good points about it, but generally if I could afford it I would go private. It takes anywhere from a month to six months to get in, but think it highly depends on the doctor for specialists. But it can take months to get CT scans, and I waited over a year and a half for an MRI. But it is very different in other places. I have to admit I am not really crazy about being in a hospital building that is over a hundred years old. At least they do not do open bay wards any more.

The problem also is the scale of the issue. Canada has something like 35 million and Britain has a population of 55 million in total population, the United States living veteran population alone is around 24 million and we do not do a sufficent job of helping veterans. So I do not know if there is a workable solution and I doubt if doctors alone are the problem.
Forum Co-moderator - Crohn's Disease/Thyroid Disorders:_All comments have the caveat contact your local health care provider.

I will find a way or make one. –Phillip Sidney 1554-1586

All that I am and all that I shall ever be, I owe to my Angel Mother.

The Bucket List- Have you found joy in your life?  Has your life brought joy to others?

Make sure your suffering has meaning…


GDen
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2009
Total Posts : 703
   Posted 11/7/2009 3:23 PM (GMT -7)   
Somebody said...
A survey released today from Jackson Healthcare reports that the majority of physicians surveyed (74 percent) feel they have less control over the way they practice medicine than they did five years ago.

According to the survey results, the cause is a combination of the threat of medical malpractice litigation, as well as insurance and government interference. However, 85 percent said the threat of medical malpractice litigation is their primary hindrance to practicing medicine as they see fit.

[...]

Although no piece of existing legislation "very strongly" represented physician views, a large majority of respondents agreed that the number one element to be included in any piece of healthcare legislation is tort reform, which was selected by 92 percent of the physicians Jackson interviewed.

www.jacksonhealthcare.com/news/md-survey-release-11-2009.aspx

They have some other good ideas:
Somebody said...
* Private insurance industry reform, including the elimination of pre-existing condition refusals, the elimination of dropped coverage (except in instances of fraud) and portability (78 percent)

* Allow professional, trade and industry associations, including Chambers of Commerce, to provide healthcare insurance to member groups (67 percent)

* Allow individuals to opt-out of Medicare or their employer-sponsored plan, and provide credits for them to purchase a plan on the individual market (61 percent)

* Create an insurance exchange that provides competition on health insurance plans (54 percent)

tsitodawg
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 845
   Posted 11/8/2009 2:00 AM (GMT -7)   
I have yet to meet a Canadian that would trade for our healthcare system and I do know many. I do not blame our Doctors or our Nurses for the extremely high cost, though I do feel like the overbilling of the hosptial facilities is out of control. It still blows me away that everytime I am in the hospital and get an itemized statement, I see that I am getting charged $75 for a tylenol or $50 for box of tissues. That is price gouging and I am so glad that the exemption of hosptials and insurance companies from price gouging laws has been banned in the new bill. I was so grateful for the clause about eliminating the pre-existing condition denials and prevents companies from charging more for premiums based on one's gender, health history, and health condition.
As for the person that said disagreed with me about having a public option will make the health companies compete, I respect you position. I also believe that those who want capitalism should see that having more options does cause those companies to lower their prices. It will not put them out of business but actually just make them honest. Maybe someone could explain to me why a CEO of an insurance company deserves a multimillion dollar contract? There are many that make over $100 million with bonuses and this makes no sense when companies are laying their lower level employees off and raising our premiums and deductibles. There are other companies doing this same practice and it has had an effect upon my family because my wife works for the largest of the financial instituion and has been told that she will not have a raise for the next 2 years yet her CEO's the next day had their salaries raised %40. They also took a day of vacation from her and our insurance is through this same company because I am on SSDI now. I qualify for Medicare because I am disabled but have yet to take it because I don't want to take more than my share, but if our premiums go up any more I will have to change over.

FunGuy
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2009
Total Posts : 1070
   Posted 11/8/2009 10:21 PM (GMT -7)   
I have heard that a lot of the cost increase started when Nixon allowed healthcare companies to become for profit. Thom Hartmann, who I admire greatly, says that it is ILLEGAL in every other industrial country in the world for a medical insurance company to be for profit. Further it has been said that the few problems with public healthcare in other countries has had to do with a lack of money. In the USA with the amount of wealth here that should not be a problem.

I favor single payer ie. Medicare for all.


I use FD&C Blue dye number 1 and it really seems to help me.  There is SCIENCE behind this.  Just ask me and I will explain it to you.  U/C and Crohn's for 34 years.  Blue dye for one month and I am feeling pretty good!  I am so excited by this but I need others to try it with their doctor's permission.  Simple food coloring!!  BLUE1.  
I can't make money on this, it's already in your kitchen.  I just want to help, especially the youngsters.
I do 2 drops in 6 ounces of water when I get up, 2 or 3 drops in 16 or 20 ounces of water that I sip all day and then 2 drops in 6 ounces of water at bedtime.   Max of 7 drops a day.


GDen
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2009
Total Posts : 703
   Posted 11/8/2009 10:44 PM (GMT -7)   
There already are a bunch of health insurance companies, competing with one another. One more as the "public option" isn't going to do much at all to lower prices, unless it's subsidized by taxpayers. Then it has an unfair advantage, will drive others out of business, and be the ONLY option. Think how much you love the DMV, IRS, and USPS!

There currently are laws that PROHIBIT companies from selling policies across state lines. Eliminating those would open up a great deal of competition.

Finally, isn't Blue Cross/Blue Shield non-profit?

FunGuy
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2009
Total Posts : 1070
   Posted 11/8/2009 11:12 PM (GMT -7)   
I am very happy with USPS, fire department, my interstate road system, and social security seems to do OK to name a few. Where I grew up the water is a lot cleaner now thanks to the Clean water act.

opening up insurance across state lines without regulation will just continue the cherry picking of the healthy while allowing the exclusion of people like us with pre-existing conditions.

Corporations are legally required to make money to the best of their ability and that is part of the escalation in healthcare costs. They are not required to give a rodent's bottom about our health or our comfort.
I use FD&C Blue dye number 1 and it really seems to help me.  There is SCIENCE behind this.  Just ask me and I will explain it to you.  U/C and Crohn's for 34 years.  Blue dye for one month and I am feeling pretty good!  I am so excited by this but I need others to try it with their doctor's permission.  Simple food coloring!!  BLUE1.  
I can't make money on this, it's already in your kitchen.  I just want to help, especially the youngsters.
I do 2 drops in 6 ounces of water when I get up, 2 or 3 drops in 16 or 20 ounces of water that I sip all day and then 2 drops in 6 ounces of water at bedtime.   Max of 7 drops a day.

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