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Sniper
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   Posted 1/9/2010 12:09 PM (GMT -7)   
We dont get too much snow here in south Louisiana and cold comes in the form of freezing weather that may last for weeks or be gone in a few days  with hot being back again. When the weather man says hard freeze we rush out and cover exposed water pipes, cover plants with blankets and put antifreeze in the pump on pressure washers and such. We usually have to undo and redo such things over and over until spring. How do you guys deal with the long cold season. Do you only have plants that tolerate the long cold winter ? How do you keep your water pipes from freezing ? We went down to 25 F last night and will hit the teens tomorrow. I know thats not very much when compared to the -0 temps some of you contend with but is tuff enough on old geezers like me. Old VV is a pro at snow I know and snohare must go even in the snow but old sniper like a viper is not very hyper when temps are exceedingly low.
If we would read the secret history of our enemies,we would find in each mans life sorrow and suffering enough to disarm all hostility.


dunny2
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   Posted 1/9/2010 2:27 PM (GMT -7)   
I guess a lot of it is down to luck Sniper. We don't have exposed water pipes, but even then, they can still freeze.
As far as plant life, we only have stuff that's hardy. Nothing that you grow down there could we have in our gardens.
I don't know about others, but my garden looks beautiful only in the spring & summer, when it's full of annuals.

I've been hearing how the whole the States have been hit with this weather, even Southern Florida. It must be tough going
when you're not expecting it. I'm originally from the Uk, and right now they are having some hellish snow storms, not normal
for them either.

Wishing you warmer times Sniper, soon. For us, well lets just say we have a ways to go yet...
Vicky

Too many years with CD
Two bowel resections, several obstructions.
Fibromyalgia and recently diagnosed with chronic pancreatitis and lupus.
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LMills
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   Posted 1/9/2010 2:38 PM (GMT -7)   
My family and I lived out in the country (I'm in the city as of three years ago for school), and we always kept our water running at a trickle to help keep the pipes from freezing. It worked for us anyway.

As for the plants, the ones that weren't potted were the kind that either reappear every spring or thrive during the winter. We just brought the rest inside if they were small enough. A lifetime in winter areas has made my family plan around it concerning gardening.

I hope you guys are able to get through this without too much hassle! I know it can be a bother.
Diagnosed with Crohn's in May of 2008.
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medchrt1
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   Posted 1/9/2010 2:55 PM (GMT -7)   
need to wrap your pipes, lumber or hardware store for the foam wrap or any insulation.
Number 2 - home heating oil (diesel) is what our furnaces run on up herein ny can get from diesel pump but then you pay the tax) so for delivery No 2 fuel going for about 2.50$ plus delivery right now. so either forced air or baseboard heat from furnace. We also use compressed liquid propane (which comes out as gas) in cooking stoves ..same as grills yuno them... and the citys have natural gas (methane) local underground pipes.
you might want to get a temporary heater such as the small electric heaters, either the oil filled which gets heated when you plug it in but doesnt burn, or the other small heaters looks like a toaster element with a lil fan. Try to keep anything else off that circuit if you plug in the small heater as it pop the breaker if you have something else on same circuit.

ivy6
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   Posted 1/9/2010 4:05 PM (GMT -7)   
What good does it do to put blankets over plants? Wouldn't the cold get to them anyway?

I don't know how you manage it every year. It just seems like such a chore, and so exhausting for people who are already ill...

Ivy (genuinely curious).
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Becoming undone
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   Posted 1/9/2010 6:36 PM (GMT -7)   
The blankets keep in air around the plants, which respirate, and have a temperature...just not as warm as animals. The blanket helps helps to insulate the warmer air in little air pockets, much the same way down does...it's those little air pockets that keep you and the birdie so warm...traps the air and heat. Oh, and for the plants keeping them well watered helps too, as the water acts as a bit of an insulator as well...even in the low deserts of Arizona, we could and used to get into the teens...I grew up around a lot of orange orchards when they used to exist before all the development.

Oh, and Sniper, I feel your pain...yeah, glad I don't have to deal with very low temps (I have lived in much colder before though), but I get cold when the temps get under 75...but the plus side, I can deal a lot better than most when it's 115...and would rather deal with that than the other side of the temp scale...yeah, I'm just a cold wimp...
"The earth laughs in flowers"


FitzyK23
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   Posted 1/9/2010 6:50 PM (GMT -7)   
I live in New England and we really don't do anything that special. Our houses are made to withstand the extreme temperatures. Every winter we unplug the garden hose and turn off the faucets to the outside while it is still above freezing. Frozen pipes only become an issue if we lose power for long enough. Most people have some kind of back up heat from a fireplace or woodstove or generator for those emergencies. People with flatter roofs have to rake the snow off and come spring almost everyone has to clear the gutters to avoid ice dams. Other than that we just pay a plow guy for the driveway. Chopping and hauling wood can be a pain though but my husband enjoys it.
27 Year old married female lawyer.  Diagnosed w/ CD 5 years ago, IBS for over 10 years before that, which was probably the CD. I am sort of lactose intollerant but can handle anything cultured and do well w/ lactose pills and lactaid. For Crohns I am currently on Pentasa 4 pills/4x day and hysociamine prn. I also have bad acid reflux and have been on PPI's since age 13. I have been through prilosec, prevacid, and nexium. Currently I am on Protonix in the morning and Zantac at night.  I take xanax prn for situational anxiety (aka no easy bathroom access). 


snohare
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   Posted 1/10/2010 6:27 AM (GMT -7)   
eyes If you are looking for wonderful ways of preventing pipes from freezing, you won't get them from me ! shakehead I was informed by my neighbours that live just forty yards away up the hill that if the temperature dropped to -10 or -15 C for a few days all the water pipes would freeze. This is just par for the course, and has already happened to them. They said it's not such a great problem until the thaw comes...
But I pretty much knew this on a very visceral level when I moved in five months ago. Because the system hadn't been drained after the last tenant left, all the pipes had burst in the frost last winter, so from the word go I had water leaking out from (unlagged mad ) pipes that sit inside the back wall, also in the kitchen, the shower, the bathroom... and now my septic tank pipe is almost totally blocked up with frozen wotsit and is backing up all the way to my shower tray. shocked
idea This is why the Victorians who built this cottage for the local estate workers expected the technology to be a gezzunda and a washbasin ewer. And if a corrupt local tradesman decide to divert the money dedicated to hidden insulation, piping etc, into his own pockets, well, I am the one who finds out the hard way - and guess what, it is jobs for the (local tradesman) boys when problems need fixing ! rolleyes (Pity the local plumber/estate handyman is away on holiday in Egypt at the moment; not back for a fortnight.)
There are very effective antifrost heaters which trickle a tiny current into copper pipes to keep them just above freezing, these are extensively used at National Trust for Scotland castles down to -20 and do fine - but I don't have any.
As for plants, they have ways and means of protecting themselves, up to a point. First of all glossy leaves help prevent windburn and water loss. Given enough water, starches can convert to sugars, which like salt have an anti-freeze effect; if you see a plant like holly or rhododendron the leaves tell you it comes from a cold climate. (Actually sugars work much better than salt, in many cases. I use household sugar on my path, as all the local shops are out of salt.) That is why parsnips and turnips taste sweeter after they have had a bit of frost.
Of course bark insulates, in the case of trees and shrubs, particularly the likes of redwoods, and there are mechanisms to remove sap and other vulnerable nutrients out of outer layers to heartwood. But given low enough temperatures for long enough, that sap will freeze, at which point the sound of exploding trees will be heard ! (Canadians from the backwoods will back me up on this one.)
The advantage of putting fleece over the plants is quite simply that although it is almost imperceptible to us, plants like humans give off heat as a byproduct of metabolism, but even the slightest bit of air movement will remove this "microclimate" from the surface of the plant where it helps protect against purely physical damage such as expansion of frozen water, contraction of tissues etc. Shove fleece over a plant and suddenly you have a much better microclimate.
None of which helps me find or dig out my parsnips or brussel sprouts, which are buried under three feet of snow ! (But well insulated by it, and will taste all the better for it ! yeah )
Must go unload some sliced cellulose and lignin-rich cambiums, xylems and phloems...did I mention a roaring hot fire ? smilewinkgrin

Nanners
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Date Joined Apr 2005
Total Posts : 14995
   Posted 1/10/2010 8:31 AM (GMT -7)   
Snow and freezing cold weather, whats that???? Haha sorry guys I live in Southern California and its supposed to be in the low to mid 70's today. Couldn't help rubbing it in:) LOL

In all seriousness, I am thankful I don't live where you all do, my bones kill me in this weather, I can't imagine what you all are suffering with the added cold.

Hugs
Gail*Nanners*
Gail*Nanners* Co-Moderator for Crohns Disease & Anxiety/Panic
Crohn's Disease for over 34 years. Currently on Asacol, Prilosec, Estrace, Prinivil, Diltiazem, Percoset prn for pain, Zofran, Phenergan, Probiotics, Calcium, Vit D, and Xanax prn. Resections in 2002 & 2005. Also diagnosed w/ Fibromyalgia, Osteoarthritis, & Anxiety. Currently my Crohns is in remission, but my joints are going crazy!
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Howlyncat
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   Posted 1/10/2010 8:45 AM (GMT -7)   
Nanners..you are spot on with what the bleeding cold does to me n others here right smack in snow belt /snowstorm/freezing part of southern ontario....i am totally chilled to the bones thus causing more pain.....love to visit Florida.....California  .hm hint hint..lol..huggles..lyn


                          
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Post Edited (Howlyncat) : 1/10/2010 9:11:38 AM (GMT-7)


Nanners
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   Posted 1/10/2010 8:46 AM (GMT -7)   
Not so sure you would like to go to Florida right now, I hear they are suffering some bitter cold too.
Gail*Nanners* Co-Moderator for Crohns Disease & Anxiety/Panic
Crohn's Disease for over 34 years. Currently on Asacol, Prilosec, Estrace, Prinivil, Diltiazem, Percoset prn for pain, Zofran, Phenergan, Probiotics, Calcium, Vit D, and Xanax prn. Resections in 2002 & 2005. Also diagnosed w/ Fibromyalgia, Osteoarthritis, & Anxiety. Currently my Crohns is in remission, but my joints are going crazy!
*Every tomorrow has two handles.  We can take hold of it by the handle of anxiety, or by the handle of faith"*

Howlyncat
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   Posted 1/10/2010 9:15 AM (GMT -7)   
They said yrs ago this was gonna happen n no one believed em..well i sure am a believer..huggles..lyn

The yr mom passed away we had the pipes freeze and they cracked as well causing LOTS of damage and money to be paid out..i think most Canucks here in So have pipes wrapped..


                          
                                Co Mod for Crohns, Anxiety/Panic, Alzheimers
   Crohns..Pyoderma gangrenosum,..Anxiety / panic..Fibromyalgia,,Neuropathy...Deaf...Seizures
 
                        I DONT COMPLAIN...OTHERS ARE WORSE OFF THAN I AM                                   
                                                     2010       
                                Donate to www.healingwell.com.
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                                      Lyn..........AKA...........Howlyncat             
                  
                                                                                           

Post Edited (Howlyncat) : 1/10/2010 9:27:10 AM (GMT-7)


Sniper
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   Posted 1/10/2010 11:11 AM (GMT -7)   
Its really not that bad here now that I am retired. The cold does play havoc with my joints though so I try to get outside things done mid day when the sun is shining. Use to have to do these things after work in the dark and cold.
Nanners is all warm and cozy over there , sitting on a fault line, but I am just fine here as when we have trimmers no one feels them . La just shakes somewhat like a large bowl of jello, but yes we have some small quakes.
Sno, pipes here are buried about 20 to 24 inches deep. My house is on a slab so the pipes are under cement. The ground will freeze to about 18 inches in a ten day hard freeze after that they may freeze in the ground and burst but seldom under a house.. Some houses are on blocks and the plumbing is exposed underneath. When I was a boy our old house was that way and I spent many a frozen winter day crawling in the mud replacing broken pipes. We were glad to get PVC pipe when it started being used as we could cut and reglue a new joint on the spot. Old galvanized pipe had to be measured , taken apart with wrenches threaded and reinstaled with new pipe joints . That takes a long long time and is hard work . Insulation on exposed pipes helps but in long freezes they either make ice and block up or break at a joint where the ice can not expand. We cover the faucets that are outside , where hoses can be attached with blankets or styrafoam. There is a new type of pipe being used now. Its called PIC. Its a continues rolled pipe that is put together where needed with crimp joints. The pipe expands when frozen so it does not burst. You may wish to look into that when you get repairs made. Some plants like citrus trees , we spray down with water just as the temp is droping to freezing. Ice forms over the tree making an insulation that help prevent damage. Its the frost just before the freeze that does the most damage.
Good to know about the sugar aspect. Being diabetic, I should not freeze, right ?
If we would read the secret history of our enemies,we would find in each mans life sorrow and suffering enough to disarm all hostility.


ivy6
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   Posted 1/10/2010 12:59 PM (GMT -7)   
Sno! That's really interesting. Thanks.

Feel free to pass a bit of that snow my way. It's going to be 43C here today, if not more, and I'm dreading it...
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Nanners
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   Posted 1/10/2010 5:00 PM (GMT -7)   
Oh Ivy I heard you Aussies were in for another extremely hot summer. Hopefully, you don't get the fires as you did last year. That was some awful for your country.

Sniper I live in the San Diego area, and most the time any earthquakes we feel are from the ones that hit other areas thank God. I don't know when the last one was here in San Diego, a long long time, probably when I was really young. There was one that hit about 10 days ago but it was in Baja California (Mexico), but with us being on the 18th floor we were swaying thats for sure. Our building is on rollers so it continued to sway for about 30 seconds after the shaker.

Its so funny how folks talk about Calif and earthquakes, but we have way fewer earthquakes than people think, the ones that are 3 to 5 on the scale we really don't even know the hit. At least, here we don't have to worry about the hurricanes and tornado's that the mid west and east coast experience every single year. But I do envy your early warning system. So I'll keep my mild weather and the rare earthquake anyday:)

Hugs
Gail*Nanners*
Gail*Nanners* Co-Moderator for Crohns Disease & Anxiety/Panic
Crohn's Disease for over 34 years. Currently on Asacol, Prilosec, Estrace, Prinivil, Diltiazem, Percoset prn for pain, Zofran, Phenergan, Probiotics, Calcium, Vit D, and Xanax prn. Resections in 2002 & 2005. Also diagnosed w/ Fibromyalgia, Osteoarthritis, & Anxiety. Currently my Crohns is in remission, but my joints are going crazy!
*Every tomorrow has two handles.  We can take hold of it by the handle of anxiety, or by the handle of faith"*

pimfram
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   Posted 1/10/2010 6:38 PM (GMT -7)   
Always makes me laugh when people complain about the "cold" temps. Anyway, in cold climates things are designed differently. Water pipes are buried deep enough as to not freeze and/or insulated well enough to not cause any problems. Since I've only lived in Minnesota, it's all I've ever known. The only times it sucks is when we get hit with a lot of snow in a short amount of time, 12 inches overnight, for instance. Roads pretty much grind to a halt, and it takes hours to travel anywhere. Other than that, it's all in what you're used to.
Diagnosed with CD July 2007
Currently on Remicade, Imuran, probiotics, folic acid, multivitamin.
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lamb61
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   Posted 1/11/2010 4:27 AM (GMT -7)   
It's a balmy 9 degrees this a.m. in the Pittsburgh, PA area. Put another log on the woodburner and grab a blanket! Or if you're like me, start the car 10 minutes before you leave just to get an ounce of heat and clear the windows of frost. Last night was the first night in a couple of weeks it didn't snow and the main roads were dry this morning.

Like Fitzy said, our houses are built to withstand the frigid temps. And our outdoor plants are either perenials that are tolerant in this zone or annuals that die off every year. I actually even have gold fish in a small pond that over winter outside.
 


snohare
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   Posted 1/11/2010 6:33 AM (GMT -7)   
I agree totally with you pimfram, it is very noticeable here in the UK that people in rural areas are used to colder weather etc and have the necessary skills, while in the towns and cities drivers in particular are much less likely to have the skills or habits that allow them to travel and live safely in adversity. I was brought up by a country loon, and he taught all his kids that if you are travelling with snow forecast then you have a shovel, a bag of sand, and maybe a couple of breeze blocks in the boot to add traction, with some warm clothes and food in case of having to dig out. City folk spin their wheels, don't have a shovel never mind know how to dig a car out of a snowdrift, and never think of carrying grit for themselves. It's not that they are dumb, they just have never learned. And when they get into really bad weather, they are less likely to recognise when their safety margins have eroded (or not). The police here were recently saying that people in Aberdeenshire should not travel unless it was absolutely vital, because conditions were so hazardous; hereabouts we locals ignored the advice and had no accidents whatsoever, in fact it was laughably easy to travel.
But I will say, in some ways prolonged lower temperatures are easier to deal with than the usual bouncing not-quite-frozen - frozen overnight - thawed again that we tend to get, where black ice appears and disappears with little warning and local authorities don't take things seriously enough to devote resources.
eyes Oh dearie me, it looks like I am doing that British thing of talking endlessly about the weather... smilewinkgrin

snohare
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   Posted 1/11/2010 7:17 AM (GMT -7)   
idea I just had a thought.( yeah I know, you probably heard the noise of the gears working all the way over there !) Some of you folkies being so well acquainted with sturm und drang, maybe you will know the answer to a question which is vexing me at present.
I managed to grow a lovely crop of potatoes this last season, and stored them in an outhouse well wrapped up against the frost. Not well enough sadly, so now many of them are frosted. What I am wondering is, if they have just turned a little spongy then are they still edible ? Can I make stovies with them ? You get frozen chips (fries) so some potatoes must presumably taste okay once frozen, but over here the farmers all consider they have lost the crop once it is frosted and nobody ever eats them - I am beginning to think that is just because once they thaw the bacteria start up and they go off.
Anyone here got any experience on this ? confused

HabsHockeyFan
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   Posted 1/11/2010 7:39 AM (GMT -7)   
Hey Sniper...you're supposed to be keeping the south warm for me! we leave for Miami next week and even FL is chilly. The carib better be warm this time! Last carib cruise I went on it wasn't all that warm feeling.

As far as my garden, I follow the gardeners charts and plant only hardy to Zone 5 type plants. There are some plants I can dig up and bury next to the house, then cover with a strudy bucket to insulate through the winter. Mostly I just have hardy perrenials (fern, hosta, bachelor buttons,more hosta, flowering vinca, other color hosta, daffodils, scilla, lilies and bleeding hearts etc). I fill in with annuals each year if the back and knees are up to it.
We only have to worry about pipes freezing in Western NY if we lose power and the house drops below 30. I only was worried during one week long ice over, but we borrow a generator and have propane heaters just in case. A good generator is worth over $500, but worth it even if we only have two ice storms in 15 years (that's the current track record)
Dx'd '90 (emergency rupture), symptoms ignored long before that, '03 fistulas and bad flagyl reactions, B12 weekly, Pentasa [until I surrender to the bigger meds]
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Sniper
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   Posted 1/11/2010 8:42 AM (GMT -7)   
Habs, perhaps you should be ready to drink frozen orange juice on ship. That can easily be turned into a screwdriver with the addition of a little booze of course. Wish I did have control of weather conditions though that could be bad for some other ,, I wont mention. Dr Freeze,,,,boy what fun I could have.
Sno, not sure about the spuds but thaw a couple out and give them a try . I may be wrong but the frozen frys may be pre cooked.
Pimfram, not complaining ,,searching for better ways to deal with it. Also , dont know your age but weather did not bother me until I became an old geezer with bad joint trouble. Back when my only ride had two wheels , I would put news papers in the front of my pants legs and jacket to shield me from cold on long rides to work. Once there' the only question was, " do I drink the coffee or soak my fingers in it?"
Lamb61, do you tuck your engine to bed at night with one of those warm all night blankets ??I had one of those that pluged into the lighter socket,,not for the engine, but for me. The long cold drive to work was much better wrapped in a warm blanket.
If we would read the secret history of our enemies,we would find in each mans life sorrow and suffering enough to disarm all hostility.


coldestspot
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Date Joined Feb 2006
Total Posts : 53
   Posted 1/11/2010 9:45 AM (GMT -7)   
Speaking of cold....I live in Gunnison Colorado...which is often the coldestspot in the nation. We have a whopping 78 growing growing days!!! If it's not colder than 20 below zero, it's not worth talking about. And yeah my arthritis is worse in the winter. Oh well. idea  Take care, Lara
Imuran 100mg, Remicade every 4 weeks ..... tried and failed many other meds. 


Grandpato2
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   Posted 1/11/2010 6:01 PM (GMT -7)   
I like British Columbia's weather not cold like the rest of Canada. Below freezing is not really that common, usually a few degrees above most of the winter. It just rains all winter which is ok by me! As I love a rainny day!
Male with Crohn's since 15 years old, diagnosed at age 46. Terminal ileum resected 2002. 5 months of remission. Crohn's has now been active since early 2003.Had a gall bladder removed Nov. of 2009. Currently on 5-asa Salofalk ,Remicade every 8 weeks, Nexium, Iron, B-12 injection every 4 weeks, Morphine Sulfate as needed for pain. Cymbalta for long term pain control. Entecort, Imuran and Prednisone in the past.


ivy6
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Date Joined Sep 2005
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   Posted 1/12/2010 12:45 AM (GMT -7)   
Sno, I'm guessing that the worst thing you could do is try a little bit of potato and see if it is ok or not.

I say "a little bit" just in case it has gone toxic or fungal or whatever, because a little is less likely to make you sick than a lot.

I'm thinking of the Little House on the Prairie books, where they made all sorts of useful food compromises when they had to (e.g. if frost hits your pumpkins before they are ripe, did you know that you can still make them into pie, and that the end result will taste like apple pie?). Who knows what you might discover with a bit of experimentation...
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Medications for Crohn's ~~ Diet and Nutritional Therapy for Crohn's ~~ Dealing with Abscesses and Fistulae ~~


ivy6
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   Posted 1/12/2010 12:46 AM (GMT -7)   
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