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WriterMum
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 166
   Posted 2/23/2010 11:39 AM (GMT -7)   
I finally got the CT scan and waited 3 weeks to hear from my GI. I called his secretary and asked to get an appointment to discuss the scan. She called back and left a message which said that since my scan was "unremarkable" she had booked me an appointment 6 months from now!! What the heck does "unremarkable" mean anyway? This is my first scan and I wanted to get some feedback. Grrrrh!
45 years old. Diagnosed with moderate to severe Crohn's in April 2005. Hiatus hernia diagnosed in 2008. Had Crohn's under control until March last year when I had a major flare up and ended up in hospital. Diagnosis is now CD and IBS. Getting it under control again.
Currently taking: Salofalk 2000 mg, Nexium, Calcium and Vitamin D, Matamucil, Yogurt for probiotics, Salofalk suppositories as needed.


Rider Fan
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2008
Total Posts : 1445
   Posted 2/23/2010 11:51 AM (GMT -7)   
I think it means there were no abnormalities.
33 y/o male. Dx'ed in 1999. No surgeries.

Current meds: Humira 2/27/09. Proferrin iron pills.

Tried SCD, didn't work, now avoiding gluten and dairy.


Go Saskatchewan Roughriders!


Kittikatt
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 422
   Posted 2/23/2010 12:12 PM (GMT -7)   

Unremarkable = GOOD!

Means there was nothing on the CT scan to make any "remarks" about. smile


Diagnosed in October, 2004 at age 32 (misdiagnosed with IBS in 2002)
38/F/SC
Current Rx's: Colazal (generic), Omeprazole (PRN), Librax, One-A-Day multivitamin, Probiotic, Omega-3 Fish Oil, Vitamin D, Cranberry pills; Slow Fe (PRN) 
Secondary conditions: swelling ankles, extreme fatigue, mouth ulcers, joint pain
Previous/occasional Rx's: Prednisone, Flagyl, Levaquin, Xifaxan, Carafate
4/7/09: Gall bladder removal laproscopic surgery (gall stones)


firecracker1
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 208
   Posted 2/24/2010 4:44 PM (GMT -7)   
Can you go to where the CT scan was performed and get a copy of the report? That's what I do. I go to the hospital, sign some paperwork, and they print a copy of the report for me.

Becky77
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 1768
   Posted 2/24/2010 5:48 PM (GMT -7)   
Are you having symptoms that you think aren't being taken care of? If not, then it's good news that the CT was clear!! If you're still having symptoms, you should talk to your GI and see if there's any other explanation for them.

firecracker-though I do get my reports, it's not a smart idea for anyone. I have a background working as an xray tech, so I understand the wording they use, but for other people, it usually stresses them because they may think something's wrong when it's just wording confusing them. That's the reason the report is sent to your dr, because they interpret them and put it into words you understand.
Becky

32 yr old female-dx with Crohn's in '97 after emergency resection and appendectomy, 2nd resection '05, Bilateral pulmonary emboli 10/09
Currently on Humira, Omeprazole, Effexor, Seroquel, Calcium, Vit D, Coumadin


firecracker1
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 208
   Posted 2/24/2010 6:13 PM (GMT -7)   
bar77, I have a copy for my own records because I have switched GI's several times. One of my old GI's never sent my records to my new GI despite several requests. Any questions about the test results I call my GI and she explains it to me. Even though the wording is technical and can be confusing, I feel it is a good idea to have copies of my medical records. I get copies of all of my bloodwork as well and any procedure or test I get done.

Becky77
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 1768
   Posted 2/24/2010 6:33 PM (GMT -7)   
I have a copy of some stuff just in case I need it for a different doctor, and I agree with you on that point. All I wanted to point out is that some people really freak out about test results. I told a patient once that they had pneumonia and they freaked out because they thought they were going to die...unknowing that pneumonia is actually common, and most people don't even have to be hospitalized for it, just given antibiotics. I think crohn's patients tend to be very informed, but other people aren't and overreact to things.
Becky

32 yr old female-dx with Crohn's in '97 after emergency resection and appendectomy, 2nd resection '05, Bilateral pulmonary emboli 10/09
Currently on Humira, Omeprazole, Effexor, Seroquel, Calcium, Vit D, Coumadin


firecracker1
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 208
   Posted 2/27/2010 6:52 AM (GMT -7)   
Becky,
I understand what you're saying now. I can see where many people would think they're in danger of dying when they are actually fine. Good point : )
Valery

CrohnieToo
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2003
Total Posts : 9448
   Posted 2/27/2010 1:29 PM (GMT -7)   
Gimmee a break!!! I so HATE and DETEST that "you won't understand" out of the mouth of a medical professional! I immediately see RED!

Patients are a lot more intelligent and eduated than today's medical profession gives them credit for. All it takes is some common sense. Why was the test being done? Just knowing that you shouldn't be surprised if something is found or isn't found.

Those people who "panic" when they don't understand something just need a fair and simple explanation which the medical profession isn't particularly good at providing.

I submit that it is a lot more cruel, gut wrenching and nerve-racking to wait weeks for the results of a test or procedure or to never be told the results at all. Something which the medical profession excels at .... leaving patients in the dark for weeks on end.

A good medical dictionary isn't all that expensive. You can even find them at rummage sales and used book stores. I have a Stedman's and a Taber's I ran across at a used book store.


My computer says I need to upgrade my brain to be compatible with its new software.

Post Edited (CrohnieToo) : 2/27/2010 1:32:17 PM (GMT-7)


WriterMum
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 166
   Posted 2/27/2010 3:06 PM (GMT -7)   
I agree. My GI is great, but he sometimes acts like information about my condition is on a "need to know" basis. For example, I was seeing a resident at my family practice until they found me a new doctor, as my family doctor had left the practice. He said, "So you had some fissures..." I had not been told anything because they were healed prior to the most recent colonoscopy. I suppose it didn't make an immediate difference, and might have worried me, but I get more worried feeling like I am not being told everything. It is the same with the CT scan. Perhaps it shows signs of scarring that are not a problem at the moment, but may give more information as to where my CD has been. I'd prefer not to wait 6 months to hear about that, if he even tells me when I go!! I am going to ask for a copy of the results. I may get them from my new family doctor, who is a little more forthcoming. She has access to everything because they are both in the same hospital system and everything gets loaded into the computer for them to see.
45 years old. Diagnosed with moderate to severe Crohn's in April 2005. Hiatus hernia diagnosed in 2008. Had Crohn's under control until March last year when I had a major flare up and ended up in hospital. Diagnosis is now CD and IBS. Getting it under control again.
Currently taking: Salofalk 2000 mg, Nexium, Calcium and Vitamin D, Matamucil, Yogurt for probiotics, Salofalk suppositories as needed.


Becky77
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 1768
   Posted 2/28/2010 7:00 AM (GMT -7)   
Chronietoo, your attack on me is completely unnecessary. That's exactly why I said "I think crohn's patients tend to be very informed, but other people aren't and overreact to things."

I definitely believe in patient education. I think all of us need to understand our bodies, our conditions, and learn to not only stand up for ourselves medically, but learn what works for us personally. I personally won't see a doctor who doesn't allow time to answer questions.

I was just making a point that sometimes people would cause undue stress on themselves if they read a report and didn't fully understand it. I think if you're going to get your own results, maybe a good idea would be to take them with you to the dr and discuss them together, and ask questions and get clarification on things that you don't completely understand, that way you walk away completely informed.

Let me just give you an example from my personal experience. I had a bone density scan done a few years ago. When the radiologist told me the results, he didn't know anything about what was done based on the results of the test. While the radiologist do understand what test results mean, sometimes they don't deal with the treatment aspect of it. I went home after having the scan, and was scared that a lot of damage was done to my bones. I made an appointment with an endocrinologist a few weeks later, who explained in full what treatments are done based on different test results. After leaving his office, I was much relieved, and better understood exactly what the numbers meant. While I did go online and research what the numbers meant, I was still confused, and stressed. Had I been directly referred to an endocrinologist and just gotten the test results and had an explanation and plan from there, I would have saved myself a lot of stress.

I know how much stress plays into CD, and I feel like undue stress from worrying about test results and a plan of action don't help us. Sometimes it's better to not know until you have a chance to ask questions and have a full understanding. Also, test results can seem bad, but because abnormal results are actually "normal" for you, things can be fine, or even getting better.

I also must say that my job as an xray tech didn't qualify me to explain treatment for patients. I was able to "pass" information to patients, only when a doctor told me I was allowed to. I wasn't given full allowance to discuss with a patient what exactly would happen from there, etc, and sometimes I feel like it's better to wait for a full explanation instead of walking away with partial information and lots of unanswered questions. For example, if a doctor told me to tell a patient that they have pneumonia and that the doctor will call them, that's all I LEGALLY can tell someone. It seems to me that sometimes it would have been better for me to just let a patient go without information and get ALL the information from the doctor, instead of just a bit of it from me, and no explanation of what's to come.

Thank you again for your attack...I was just trying to help, and I didn't ask to be attacked for my OPINION. In addition, coming from a moderator makes it even worse. I thought this was a place we could express our opinions in a means to try to help others.
Becky

32 yr old female-dx with Crohn's in '97 after emergency resection and appendectomy, 2nd resection '05, Bilateral pulmonary emboli 10/09
Currently on Humira, Omeprazole, Effexor, Seroquel, Calcium, Vit D, Coumadin

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