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Ghost mom
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 15
   Posted 5/11/2007 8:06 AM (GMT -7)   
I'm wondering if anyone out there who suffers from panic attacks could help me. The other day when my husband came home from work, he told me that while he was in a training class he got a sort of tight, might have to burp feeling in his chest and then started to get tunnel vision and pass out. He caught himself before his head hit the desk, but it scared him a lot. He said he was shaky for a little afterward but then he was fine. It wasn't low blood sugar or dehydration, but he has been under a lot of stress. Does this sound like a panic attack?

Thanks!
GM

harry4
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2005
Total Posts : 1449
   Posted 5/11/2007 3:34 PM (GMT -7)   

perhaps but he  should see a doctor and get checked out

panic attacks come in many versions, details on the net


recovered former longtime anxiety and panic attack sufferer and helper of other sufferers  but no training or  qualifications in medicine or psychology, any remarks that may be taken as advice must be confirmed with doctor or other health professional
emails are welcome but do mention healingwell to avoid risk of deletion as spam


TexasJen
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 649
   Posted 5/11/2007 8:38 PM (GMT -7)   
That's similar to what happens to me, and yes, I think he had a panic attack. When a person experiences a panic attack, the "fight or flight" instinct is triggered (for whatever reason) and that results in measurable physiological responses: hyperventillation, adrenaline is released, chest pain, feeling faint, etc. Although there is no "thing" there to fight, the body reacts as though there is something trying to harm it. I experienced panic attacks while going through a divorce, and also when driving over very tall bridges. Go figure! Now that I know the bridges are a problem, I can at least control my breathing enough to get over them without totally wigging out and causing a wreck. My psychologist tells me that the first thing to do is focus on breathing. The "fight or flight" response makes us hyperventillate, which makes us feel faint, which adds to the panic, and there you go into the vicious circle until you pass out.

If your husband can recognize the panic attack when it first comes on, or can recognize anything that triggers it, he needs to start reminding himself that it's just that: a panic attack. He is NOT going to die. Next, concentrate on deep breathing instead of hyperventillating. Slow, deep breaths focusing on the "out" more than the "in". If he can stop the hyperventillation, he won't pass out. Some people even keep paper bags handy to breathe in just in case they get into a triggering situation and can't control their breathing.

Is this something new for your husband, or a recurring problem? If it's happened for a while, a psychologist can help him learn some techniques to deal with the attacks when he feels them coming on. And NO, that doesn't mean he is "crazy." It is nothing to be ashamed of, but something that can be dealt with so it doesn't take over his life.
Living in the Republic of Texas minus a gallbladder, a couple of cervical discs, appendix, uterus, and 18" of colon; but living with my wonderful husband, 2 dogs, 1 cockatiel, and 2 gold fish. 


ShynSassy
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Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 3036
   Posted 5/13/2007 6:26 AM (GMT -7)   
Ghost mom
I agree,he really needs to get into the doctor and tell them what is going on.
That is very scary,so glad he was not driving at the time.


Please keep us posted.


Shy
Mod- Depression

Chronic Depression, Panic Attacks,Anxiety Attacks,Anorexia
Meds I have taken throughout the years:Wellbutrin,Tranxene,Paxil,Prozac,Valium,
Currently taking none.
www.healingwell.com/donate

"I am woman,hear me roar one day and cry the next!!!"


debaser
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Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 1745
   Posted 5/14/2007 6:29 AM (GMT -7)   
It's rare for people to pass out during a panic attack ( a la Tony Soprano), but it does happen. Panic attacks come in all shapes and sizes just like Harry said. Still, since passing out is rare I think you'd want to go to the doctor to rule out other stuff.
My Brain: My friend, My enemy: A blog to chronicle my attempt to recover from anxiety/panic disorder
anxietypanicdisorder.blogspot.com/


Ghost mom
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 15
   Posted 5/14/2007 6:30 AM (GMT -7)   
Thank you for all your kind replies. I want to believe it's a panic attack, since the alternatives scare the h** out of me. He knows he needs to see a doctor and plans to. He just has to jump through the insurance hoops and find one in our area. He's a bit of a procrastinator (so am I). I'll keep nagging him, gently, of course. ; )

GM

ShynSassy
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 3036
   Posted 5/15/2007 5:06 AM (GMT -7)   
I would continue nagging at him..men can be so stubborn when it comes to their health.



Please keep us posted


Shy
Mod- Depression

Chronic Depression, Panic Attacks,Anxiety Attacks,Anorexia
Meds I have taken throughout the years:Wellbutrin,Tranxene,Paxil,Prozac,Valium,
Currently taking none.
www.healingwell.com/donate

"I am woman,hear me roar one day and cry the next!!!"

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