Insulin resistant. Tips

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Montana1
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2007
Total Posts : 15
   Posted 12/28/2007 10:08 AM (GMT -7)   
I am so glad I found all of you! This is my first time posting. I was just recently told I had insulin resistance. My glucose tolerance test came back at 149. I am able to keep my numbers at a good range by staying away from most carbs and doing at least 30 minute workouts in my torture device (Elliptical :-)) As many of you know there is so much information out there and makes me want to pull my hair out. First thing I wanted to know was if this condition can be reversed. Some places it say no, other places say yes, that through diet and exercise you can re-teach your body how to become insulin sensitive again. Have any of you heard of this? As I was saying I am able to keep my blood sugars at a good range. A few days ago I tested to see what a full blown carb meal would do to me. I had a couple of pieces of pizza and some birthday cake. My numbers went up to 138. That is the highest it has been for me. Usually with a low carb meal never goes beyond 120 and most of the times it stays in the very low 100's. Am I mistaken thinking that this is good control? Or should I be striving for lower numbers?
I also wanted to get your opinions of several things that I have not seen mentioned here so far. First is the Agave nectar as a sweetener. Has anyone tried it? and if so what does it do to your bs? How about Apple Cider Vinegar with the "Mother"? and last but not least, and one that I think is keeping my numbers down in the morning is Cinnamon. I am taking 1/2 tsp before I go to bed and my numbers have not been over 90 in the morning since taking this. Has anyone tried any of this remedies? Thank you so much for any input in advance.

Montana1

gelchick
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 477
   Posted 12/28/2007 1:06 PM (GMT -7)   
Montana
 
All of your reported numbers are, at the very least, in the prediabetic range. Non-diabetics generally average in the low to mid-80's. They will have a substantial initial rise in blood glucose after eating a high-carb meal, but it will quickly drop down to pre-meal values (by 2 hours after the first bite of the meal). Their morning fasting numbers fall within the non-diabetic range.
 
Agave nectar is reported to be low glycemic- I tried it and didn't care for the taste. I prefer to use Stevia to sweeten when necessary. A lot has been written about apple cider vinegar- a friend on another forum tried taking it to control his dawn phenomenon and it seemed to work for about 2 weeks - then the DP kicked in again. Cinammon works for some- but if you're eating common cinnamon-you could be killing your stomach. All of the reasearch was performed using a water extract of cinnamon called Cinnulin PF in a very specific controlled dose, and it didn't work for all subjects in the study.
 
You'd be far better off dropping the level of carbs you eat in a given day and increasing your exercise to include aerobic and strength training for a minimum of 5 hours a week. With some 'genetic luck' and determined follow-through, you might be able to avoid being tagged a diabetic- but if the tendency is there, it's there- FOREVER.
all the best
sandy
I just want to live happily ever after-every now and then. Jimmy Buffett


Montana1
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2007
Total Posts : 15
   Posted 12/28/2007 5:42 PM (GMT -7)   
gelchick,
Thank you for your reply. Wow! I was so proud when having numbers in the low 100's. I was feeling so good about my self because the few times that I tested higher than 120 I checked my husband right away too( after having similar meals) and his is almost always higher than me. (supposedly he is "normal") Maybe I should ask him to get tested next time he is at the doctors. Here is what I have read. And apparently that is wrong: Non-diabetics fasting numbers 70- 99. Two hours after meals 70-139. Diabetics should be less than 180 two hours after meals. If it goes 200 or higher that is a diagnosis of diabetes. Is this right? Thank you for your input and advice!

Montana1

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5406
   Posted 12/28/2007 8:58 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi Montana, welcome to the Forum.  As Sandy said, you're probably considered a pre-diabetic in that your blood sugar isn't at critical levels and you're also able to control it somewhat.  So, you're ahead of the game at this point, especially since you're monitoring it and wanting to learn more about diabetes.  I've also seen those numbers you cited, or variations of them, IMHO they're way too high.  You'll find different guidelines from doctors and from some websites - but in any case, a normal's blood sugar would only spike in the 100's after a high-carb meal and then go back down to a normal level somewhere in the 80's after a couple of hours or sooner.  Two hours after an average meal (called "post-prandial"), a normal's blood sugar should not repeatedly go to 139.  Anything over 150 for more than a couple of hours may be doing damage to internal organs.  The best way to keep the blood sugar in check is to stop or drastically reduce carbohydrates - and if you poke around some of our previous posts here, you'll see what most of us eat in order to control blood sugar.  Whether a person is on meds or not, eating low-carb will bring down blood sugar readings absolutely.  So, read up on what we've posted here and keep learning as much as you can.  You're on the right track!  And I also think it's a good idea for your husband to be tested as well.  Many people have a genetic predisposition to diabetes and will always have to beware of blood sugar readings creeping up.  This has happened with me; diabetes runs in my family as it does in many or most type 2's.  Another benefit of low-carb eating is that it makes it really easy to lose weight if you need to.  Good luck!
:-)
Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
"pre-diabetic" controlled so far by diet and exercise
following low/no carb diet, no meds


Montana1
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2007
Total Posts : 15
   Posted 12/28/2007 10:38 PM (GMT -7)   
Lanie,

Thank you so much for your reply. I will certainly be watching my carbs more closely. I will keep striving for those numbers under 100. Do you manage your bs well? are you diabetic or pre-diabetic? what are your numbers like? Also one quick question is pre-diabetes the same as insulin resitant? or is there a difference? I am really interested in managing this condition as my grandfather had diabetes and so does one of my ants. My husband is going straight to the doctors and having a glucose tolerance test. Thank you kindly.
Montana

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5406
   Posted 12/29/2007 7:41 AM (GMT -7)   
"Prediabetic" is probably a misnomer.  I should say I am a "diet-controlled diabetic" because I cannot eat everything and have normal blood sugar readings.  I can only have "normal" blood sugar readings throughout the day, including the morning fasting and the A1c when I don't eat any carbs, which is exactly how it's been for a little more than 8 or 9 months.  It was about a year ago when I started monitoring my blood sugar.  As I wrote, diabetes runs in my family.  If I went back to carbs, my blood sugar would be much higher.  A year ago, I was waking up to 140's and having 160's during the day.  It spiked to over 200 after eating junk at Easter.  Since cutting out carbs and starting a program of exercise and strength training (so, losing weight),  my morning fasting is under 100 and I never go higher than 120 at any time.  There have been days that I've been under 100 all day long and those are days when I've eaten very very minimally for one reason or another, not trying to starve, just not hungry or on the go.  Anyway, this is how I control my diabetes so far but I'll always have to stay away from carbs.  Diabetes won't go away but it can be managed.  According to what I've read, insulin resistance is when there are higher levels of insulin running through the body (every person has different levels) and when carbs are eaten, the body over-reacts, blood sugar spikes and fat is stored faster.  If a person loses weight, it's easier to control the blood sugar.  (I know someone else can explain this better!)  The bottom line at this point is that if you are still able to control your blood sugar yourself by diet and exercise, that's great.  If the numbers are creeping up, then meds should be taken to bring them down to avoid damage to the body.  I hope this is working for you.  Stay around.  As you see, we have some interesting discussions! 
Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
"pre-diabetic" controlled so far by diet and exercise
following low/no carb diet, no meds


Montana1
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2007
Total Posts : 15
   Posted 12/29/2007 8:59 AM (GMT -7)   
Thank you Lanie,

wow, waking up to 140 is high right? I was told by my doctor if my bs went up to 126 or higher in the morning fast to give her a call. I got desperate when i woke up once to 113 thinking I was only 13 points short of that feared 126 line! Thankfully I almost always stay under 99 because I don't think I could take that panic for too many mornings. I some times think I am letting the fear of full blow diabetes rule my life, and I let go of the rope. The other day we took a weekend trip to San Francisco, I had the most wonderful Chinese full carb meal in what seems to be a long time. I savor every single bite. After wards I was dreading that two hour after test, surely my numbers were going to be higher than ever, this is were i was going to get into the high 100's. But luckily it was not as bad as I expected. How do you get to that middle ground where you are not too desperate or where you are not just giving up? This is going to be the challenge for me.
Hope you have a great day Lanie,
Take care
Montana

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5406
   Posted 12/29/2007 9:21 AM (GMT -7)   
I think the ADA states the magic number 126 when diagnosing diabetes but that's fuzzy and too high anyway.  Normals' morning fasting numbers are supposed to be under 100 and most people would say in the 80's.  Getting to the "middle ground" is a mindset.  You may find yourself diligent and controlled for a time and then say 'what the heck' and indulge.  It's a rare person who cuts everything out completely and sticks to it.  The thing is you have to make a commitment to yourself to keep your blood sugar to normal levels; it's a new lifestyle.  If you do, an occasional treat will not hurt you - but this is my opinion.  Others may disagree.  A low-carb diet allows you to eat wonderful food but not breads, cereals, cakes, rice or potatoes.  Once you get used to it, it's very easy.  I think I have a leaning toward carbs and it might be my predispostion.  I swear it's true.  I really could have lived on bread alone a year ago.

Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
"pre-diabetic" controlled so far by diet and exercise
following low/no carb diet, no meds


Montana1
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2007
Total Posts : 15
   Posted 12/29/2007 10:29 AM (GMT -7)   
Yes! me too.... My daily breakfast was always a beagle with cream cheese or a piece of toast with coffee and two teaspoons of sugar. My favorite snack was a peace of garlic bread and a small piece of brie cheese. Unfortunately bread forgot our alliance and betrayed me nono :-) Darn, I miss it. But hey I am making friends with the squirrelly bread now and is not bad at all with a grood bit of the good olive oil.

Montana

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5406
   Posted 12/29/2007 11:02 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi Montana, I found the cheese puffs (from Dr. Bernstein's book) suit me fine and I use them as "bread" for sandwiches, snacks and with breakfast.  (This is processed American cheese slices on freezer paper microwaved for about 1 1/2 to 2 min. depending on the microwave.)  The good thing about the low-carb diet is I don't have any cravings.  Eating meats, cheese, eggs, butter (yes, butter), olive oil on salads and vegetables.... have stopped feelings of hunger.  Carbs seem to make me hungrier.  Eat the cheese but not the bread.  I take a wedge of most any cheese along with dinner.  Have a good day!  By the way, if you get the Ladies Home Journal that was talked about in another thread, the eating plan most of us follow is clearly explained.

Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
"pre-diabetic" controlled so far by diet and exercise
following low/no carb diet, no meds


gelchick
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 477
   Posted 12/30/2007 3:23 PM (GMT -7)   

Montana

I have tested my daughters and husband right along with myself before meals and at the 1, 2, 3, and 4 hour mark. They have all been tested for impaired glucose metabolism at my insistence and expense ( their doctors refused to give them a glucose tolerance test because their fastings were fine- despite data that clearly shows that the fasting number is the LAST thing to show problems. They were all within normal ranges- but now there is a baseline for comparsion!), so I'm confident that when I sample them- the results are true.

They all have a significant rise at 1 hour and are almost back to premeal by 2 hours. That's because they have a good initial insulin response (insulin resistant type 2's do not), and an excellent secondary insulin response- so the glucose gets cleared out fast. Case closed. It doesn't matter if it is higher or lower than mine- their bodies take care of business, and the insulin level and blood glucose level drop back to normal pronto.

I see a slower rise that is far more sustained than my kids. I have a higher level of circulating insulin due to insulin resistance (dangerous in itself- lots of new evidence shows this is as damaging as sustained glucose levels). It takes longer to mount an even higher insulin response to get rid of the carbs - more potential for damage to occur. That's why a low carb diet is so good for type 2's- if there are low or no carbs being ingested, insulin demand is lower. Proteins provoke insulin response, but do not elevate blood glucose levels- so eating low carb is not a ticket to eating huge steaks etc. Fats are the only substance which do not affect blood glucose levels or provoke insulin response. This is contrary to conventional wisdom- but look where following conventional wisdom has led us- to diabesity!

sandy


I just want to live happily ever after-every now and then. Jimmy Buffett


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 12/31/2007 11:14 AM (GMT -7)   
Montana1 said...
Yes! me too.... My daily breakfast was always a beagle with cream cheese


Somebody call the ASPCA!!! Montana is eating beagles! What's next? Little baby kittens? (LOL!) Gotta love those typos!!
~ Jeannie, Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
~Please remember that 50% of all doctors graduated in the bottom half of their class! Yours may be one of them...
"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5406
   Posted 12/31/2007 12:23 PM (GMT -7)   
Beagles and kittens?  Argh.  I've heard they even eat the cute little haggis in Scotland, ears and all!  Well, I'm just going to stay with mushrooms since they're only fungus.
smurf
Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
"pre-diabetic" controlled so far by diet and exercise
following low/no carb diet, no meds


fergusc
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 230
   Posted 1/1/2008 2:25 PM (GMT -7)   
You heard wrong, Lanie. We don't eat the cute ones - we need those so the tourists keep coming. We only eat the big fat ones, and even then only when we're all out of beagles.
And I haven't been called fungus for quite a long time!

Fergus
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