Is it useful for a non-diabetic to test post meal glucose?

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arzoo
New Member


Date Joined Oct 2007
Total Posts : 11
   Posted 12/31/2007 11:09 AM (GMT -7)   
I am a non-diabetic, however, a couple of my uncles in my mom's side are type 2 diabetics and my mom has been bordering between levels of non-diabetic and pre-diabetes. As such, I do a fasting blood sugar test annually.

I am wondering if there are any benefits for a non-diabetic in keeping record of post meal glucose levels, ie. maybe to be able to tailor and modify meal composition to improve overall blood glucose stability, or something like keeping things in line now will keep pancreatic beta cells functioning w/o overburdening, or the body from becoming insulin resistant sooner. Or, there is no practical benefit currently since the pancreas are functioning well and it doesn't really matter because they can handle and adjust to the burden?

Thanks.

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5396
   Posted 12/31/2007 12:27 PM (GMT -7)   
Arzoo, I think you had posted awhile back that you had tested borderline.  In any case, since diabetes runs in your family, I suggest that you cut down on carbs and do test yourself after meals every so often if you have a monitor.  In this way you can probably keep your blood sugar within control instead of having it slowly creep upwards over the years.  That's my two cents.



Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
"pre-diabetic" controlled so far by diet and exercise
following low/no carb diet, no meds


metres
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 32
   Posted 12/31/2007 12:49 PM (GMT -7)   
Lanie has it right. That's probably good preventitive advice for everyone.

There are people who take it further, even as far as to suggest that even healthy non-diabetics should take insulin to keep their sugar levels down. One fellow (non-diabetic) takes Lantus every day, and fast acting insulin at each meal. You can find someone online to support just about any idea. And no, I won't provide his URL.

arzoo
New Member


Date Joined Oct 2007
Total Posts : 11
   Posted 12/31/2007 8:57 PM (GMT -7)   
I'd like to pose a follow up question, I was thinking, though unsure if this makes sense... but here goes.

When testing post meal glucose, if a non-diabetic eats a whole ton of carbs, like a whole pizza or a really big bowl of pasta, wouldn't the readings go off the charts, then settle down. So, in effect, it may be a false reading and cause unnecessary concerns. Can this happen?

How does one make the post meal glucose testing 'valid', is there a sense to what I'm thinking? Pls. correct me if I'm mistaken anywhere.


By the way, Metres mentioned a non-diabetic taking insulin as a profilactic. Is there any sense to doing this?

I mean, will this help ward off diabetes, maybe by strengthening the pancreas or easing the insulin burden on the beta cells?

Thanks again.

metres
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 32
   Posted 12/31/2007 10:15 PM (GMT -7)   
I don't see any point in a non-diabetic taking regular BS readings. Once in a while may help detect if a problem is developing, but there's no need to do it all the time.

Non-diabetics produce insulin when they eat, but I don't know how well it balances against a really big carb load. Probably not a good time to test. Hmm... of course, if non-diabetics do handle that situation well, then it's a perfect time to do your test. If you read high when a non-diabetic wouldn't, you have problems.

The non-diabetic I refered to who takes insulin touts it as an antiaging regime, and thinks it saves your pancreas's beta cells. He thinks a BS reading of even 100 is too high, even after eating. He's definitely extreme. He makes a big point of how it only costs him 20 cents a day for insulin, but forgets to mention that his needles and test strips cost him $6.50 a day (my estimate). I wouldn't want to buy a used car from him.

fergusc
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 230
   Posted 1/1/2008 2:10 PM (GMT -7)   
I think there are simply too many variables involved in blood sugar resposes for occasional tests to reveal anything meaningful. A simple glucose tolerance test would be far more informative wouldn't it?
As I understand it, a non-diabetics blood sugar would rise from around 70 mg/dl to around 130-140 within an hour of consuming 50 grams of dextrose, then return to where it started within an hour and a half. This indicates that there is little circulating insulin before the dextrose is consumed, but that it quickly produced in response to the sugar load. Obese or pre-diabetic people would typically show a higher blood glucose reading prior to the test, perhaps 80 or above, and a much lower peak, perhaps as low as 90-95 mg/dl. this is symptomatic of hyperinsulinemia - too much circulating insulin created by regular cosumption of excessive carbohydrates. It's long-term hyperinsulinemia which burns out the pancreas eventually, and then blood sugars go crazy.
Metre's, your non-diabetic is kidding himself taking insulin as an anti-aging regime. He's going to have a lot more success cutting down on the carbohydrates so there's less need for insulin at all. That's how to ease the burden on the beta cells.

All the best, and Happy New Year!

fergusc

metres
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 32
   Posted 1/1/2008 5:11 PM (GMT -7)   
fergusc,

You don't need to tell me he's off base. I won't provide his URL because I think he's a nutcase. I only mentioned him as an example of how you can find someone ot support almost any viewpoint, no matter how extreme.
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