Organic Buckwheat Groats

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Sydnee10
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Date Joined Jun 2003
Total Posts : 561
   Posted 8/9/2008 2:34 AM (GMT -7)   
Before I started really paying attention to Carbs,I bought a bag of Arrowhead Mills Brand Organic Buckwheat Groats..the Groats is a high Fiber Food with 4 Grams of Fiber per serving..135 MG of Potassium per serving,but 31 Grams of Carb per serving..Because it is a whole Grain,wouldn't the Carbs be more in the line of a complex Carb rather than a simple Carb?
 


stkitt
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Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 32602
   Posted 8/9/2008 5:05 AM (GMT -7)   

Sydnee,

Good Morning, I just notice your post and guess I must have missed that you were diabetic in your posts in A & P and Depression.  Sorry about that.

If you look to the right under resources you will see HW has listed great choices for members to use.

I like the book The Official Pocket Guide to Diabetic Exchanges.  Also are you working with a Registered Dietitian to help teach you how to evaluate which foods are best and how to evaluate the nutrition labels on the packaged foods? 

Many of the books listed are inexpensive and if ordered online will be delivered right to your home.

I really am not an expert on complex carbs versus simple carbs when it comes to groats. That may be where a Dietitian would be your best resource.

Take care

Kitt


 

Kitt, Moderator: Anxiety/Panic & Depression
& GERD  Forums
*~*
http://www.healingwell.com/donate *~*
Not a mental health professional of any kind
It is health that is real wealth and not pieces of gold and silver.~Mahatma Gandhi~
Clickable Link: Anxiety-Panic Resources


Sydnee10
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Date Joined Jun 2003
Total Posts : 561
   Posted 8/9/2008 5:15 AM (GMT -7)   

Goodmorning Kitt,

I haven't been diagnosed with Diabetes,however was diagnosed with Reactive Hypoglycemia.Am trying to eat Healthy,Nutritiously and follow a Low-Glycemic Index,Low-Carb/No Carb,Low-Fat and High Fiber Diet.

Thank you for the Resources and the link..I will look into discussing Complex and Simple Carbs with a Dietician,or read in my College Nutrition Book.Took a Nutrition course for RN School and couldn't sell the Book back.

I don't know anyone who would eat Buckwheat Groats and seeing that I paid $6.39 + Tax for a 1.5 LB bag..

 

Have a terrific Morning



 


LanieG
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Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5403
   Posted 8/9/2008 6:33 AM (GMT -7)   
Groats are complex carbs because they are not processed.  They have fiber which makes the carb content longer to digest so the blood sugar doesn't spike.  The simple carbs like sugar and white bread (and most cold breakfast cereals) will make the blood sugar rise quickly, which is why there is a trend now to more complex or high-fiber carbs.  Because groats are not processed, they have their original nutrients, unlike processed flour from all kinds of cereal.  Processed flour is stripped of its nutrients so food manufacturers add the nutrients back in.  You can cook groats like oatmeal or add it to other food but as you say, why would you buy it unless you're a serious vegetarian knowing several ways to cook and eat it?   As for the blood sugar, a diabetic and someone with reactive hypoglycemia might find sharp rises in blood sugar and then lows, reactions you don't want.
 
Of course, goats are probably low carb. smurf


Post Edited (LanieG) : 8/9/2008 10:26:28 AM (GMT-6)


Jeannie143
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Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 8/9/2008 6:36 AM (GMT -7)   
Syd,
Carbs is carbs is carbs. They all break down into glucose. If you're trying to restrict carbs then don't purchase any starches. Low glycemic vs. high glycemic vs. carb consumed with a fat vs. glycemic load... There are a lot of variables here and the only way to find out how they effect your metabolism is by testing two hours after a meal.

Labels and lists won't help you if you don't have a full understanding of glycemic load. There is an excellent explanation of this at Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load. It may be the key you are looking for with your hypoglycemia. It will take a lot of research and self testing but you should be able to find the right food combination for yourself if you keep a food diary with accurate measurements of the foods consumed and the test results two hours afterward. The two hour time is determined to be the length of time it takes for a normal to return to a stable blood glucose after a carb load.

It 's good that you are doing all this learning now because the odds are that you will "flip flop" into a full blown diabetic. Many of us here, including myself started out as hypoglycemics. Good luck with this.
~ Jeannie, Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
I know God will not give me anything I can't handle. I just wish that He didn't trust me so much. ~Mother Teresa

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


stkitt
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 32602
   Posted 8/10/2008 1:50 PM (GMT -7)   

Great answer from Jeanie,

I would start learning as much as you can by going to the link Jeanie provided,  Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load.

It is a wonderful thing to have this forum available but don't forget to work with your physician.

Kitt


 

Kitt, Moderator: Anxiety/Panic & Depression
& GERD  Forums
*~*
http://www.healingwell.com/donate *~*
Not a mental health professional of any kind
It is health that is real wealth and not pieces of gold and silver.~Mahatma Gandhi~
Clickable Link: Anxiety-Panic Resources


gelchick
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 477
   Posted 8/10/2008 3:06 PM (GMT -7)   
Buckwheat groats are 38% protein by weight. They contain all of the nutrition of buckwheat (which is considerable in B vitamins and others) becasue they are NOT processed- they contain all of their fiber also. They are not an empty carb.
 
I sprout them and use them in sprouted bread. I roast them in olive oil (raw and unsprouted, they tend to be bitter) and then use them in casseroles and salads. After roasting,they are called kasha and are found in many Russian and Hungarian recipes. Some of my friends sprout them and use them in breakfast cereal mixes.
 
Groats and kasha do  not spike my blood sugar at all. Their amino acid profile is 99 ( 100 = egg white the perfect protein) which makes them an excellent source of vegetarian protein at a very reasonable cost per gram of protein. It would be a shame to exclude them from your diet purely because of their carb count.
 
Find a recipe that has the balance of protein/carb/fat that you are trying to stick to, eat a portion and test your sugar. I try to eat on the cheap at all times without sacrificing my nutrition and find that groats are a tasty addition to my menus year round.
 
sandy
I just want to live happily ever after-every now and then. Jimmy Buffett


Sydnee10
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Date Joined Jun 2003
Total Posts : 561
   Posted 8/10/2008 9:39 PM (GMT -7)   

Lanie,

I've always been a Meat eater,however lately have thought about eating less Meat simply because I can't find Organic Grass Fed Beef or Mercury free Fish.Am trying to find other sources of Protein instead of eating Meat.I really don't see a problem eating Buckwheat Groats once per Week or perhaps once every couple of Weeks.Am talking about 1 serving only..

As for Goats..I detest them!They stink,are ugly,eat everything in sight and leave little pills all over the place! nono


 


Sydnee10
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2003
Total Posts : 561
   Posted 8/10/2008 9:43 PM (GMT -7)   

Jeannie,

I can not test until I receive the Meter's I sent for.I should receive in another Week or two.I really appreciate Lanie sending links to my e-mail :-)

I will give the link you included a good looking over..Oh I'm almost positive I'll "flip flop" into being a full blown Diabetic if I'm not already..I was diagnosed as Reactive Hypoglycemia at age 21-22..am now 35 headed toward 36 sad


 


Sydnee10
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2003
Total Posts : 561
   Posted 8/10/2008 9:45 PM (GMT -7)   

Kitt,

Am having problem returning to my Physician..guess I'm gonna have to purchase a Wagon and a team of Horses! tongue



 


Sydnee10
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2003
Total Posts : 561
   Posted 8/10/2008 9:51 PM (GMT -7)   
Sandy,
The Buckwheat Groats I bought are a source of high Fiber.They are also high in Potassium (135 MG)..just have 31 Grams total Carb..
What I will more than likely do is:Eat then 2 hours after eating check my BS to know if I can eat BWG's..
How do you sprout?The reason I bought the Groats is..a Friend told me her Mother makes Buckwheat Pancakes and they sounded yummy.Her Mother has Cholesterol issues,but doesn't count Carbs.

 


gelchick
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 477
   Posted 8/11/2008 8:32 AM (GMT -7)   

Put 2/3 Cup of seed into a bowl .
Add 2-3 times as much cool (60-70 degree) water.
Mix seeds up to assure even water contact for all.
Allow seeds to Soak for 20 - 60 minutes.
(Note: Groats take up all the water they need quickly. They get waterlogged if soaked too long, and will never sprout - so - Don't over-soak!) 

Drain off the soak water.

Rinse thoroughly with cool (60-70°) water

Note: Groats create the starchiest water on Earth - it is amazingly thick! They won't sprout too well unless you get rid of it - so Rinse and Rinse and Rinse until the water runs clear. It can take a little while - but don't skimp.

Rinse until the water runs clear. Drain thoroughly.

Set anywhere out of direct sunlight and at room temperature (70° is optimal) between Rinses.

Rinse and Drain again in 4-8 hours.
And, perhaps one more...
Rinse and Drain in 4-8 hours.
And, possibly one more...
Rinse and Drain in 4-8 hours.

I like my sprouts small so I stop whenever they have tiny tails. The sprouts are done 8-12 hours after the  final rinse. Be sure to Drain them as thoroughly as possible after that final rinse.

The goal during the final 8-12 hours is to minimize the surface moisture of your sprouts - they will store best in your refrigerator if they are dry to the touch.

Transfer your sprout crop to a plastic bag or the sealed container of your choice - glass is good - and put them in your refrigerator - if you can keep from eating them all first.

Note: Grains do not store well in refrigeration so you should try to grow just what you need. They continue to grow - even in the refrigerator.

 

This is how I sprout them for my bread- I wonder if your friend's mother uses buckwheat flour- which is milled buckwheat, not groats. I think these directions originally came from the sproutman site, or maybe sproutpeople.com - I can't remember.  I do kasha differently.

sandy

 


I just want to live happily ever after-every now and then. Jimmy Buffett


whirleegig
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2008
Total Posts : 1
   Posted 9/22/2008 9:38 PM (GMT -7)   
Buckwheat may be a special exception!!
Buckwheat contains the highest naturally occurring amounts of D-chiro-inositol, which positively effects blood sugar. It's recommended for people with insulin-resistance. It regulates blood sugar.

Sydnee10
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2003
Total Posts : 561
   Posted 9/23/2008 10:13 PM (GMT -7)   

Whirleegig,

Do you have a source (website etc) to back up your claim?The Brand (from a reputable Company) of Buckwheat Groats I bought has 31 total Grams of Carb,so I gave to a Neighbor.


 


Sydnee10
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2003
Total Posts : 561
   Posted 9/23/2008 10:15 PM (GMT -7)   

Sandy,

Does Sprouting Buckwheat Groats change the Carb content?


 


gelchick
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 477
   Posted 9/24/2008 7:21 AM (GMT -7)   

Sydnee,

I am not sure if the carb content changes. The sticky water suggests to me that some of the starch is being washed away, just like when I make seitan, rinsing the starch away from the high gluten flour leaves the protein for me to work with.

Sprouting tends to change the composition of a grain in general. Sprouted breads do not raise my blood sugar, where regular breads do.

The thing to remember about buckwheat is that is has a good ratio of protein to carb, and a fair amount of those carbs are fiber which helps to lower blood sugar levels. it contains a lot of nutrients also. It is an unprocessed food, so it still contains all of its goodness.

Controlling our sugar level is important, but we also must consider our nutritional needs. I'm not a fan of elminating any natural, unprocessed food from my diet just because of its carb level. I always test its effect on my numbers and I have found that most natural foods in correct portion sizes do not raise my sugar levels. I enjoy a wide range of healthy, nutritious food- I do not feel deprived or driven to binge eat, and my numbers are all in good ranges.

sandy


I just want to live happily ever after-every now and then. Jimmy Buffett

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