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TVEditor
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2008
Total Posts : 481
   Posted 8/12/2008 5:06 AM (GMT -7)   
Just to see what would happen to my BS if I tried the 'no starch' plan, I skipped my usual potato with supper last night & tried an egg with a piece of cheese (usually have cereal & fruit) this morning.  My before meal reading was 7.1 (app. 126 according to Lainie's chart) and 7.9 after meal.  The after-meal reading has usually been 10-12.
 
Virtually instant improvement!
 
Chris

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5407
   Posted 8/12/2008 7:01 AM (GMT -7)   
Great!  Honestly, I'm confident you'll see daily improvement with the diet change just as I did.  I kept a very detailed food log that I can look back on and see what food/meals were better than others.  Many factors affect the blood sugar, of course, but this is one way to take control.  Congratulations!
yeah
Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds


TVEditor
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2008
Total Posts : 481
   Posted 8/12/2008 7:52 AM (GMT -7)   
I started my log book & diet the day after I saw the nutirionist. Glad I did ... good reference. Since I'm also a bit anaylitical (a bit ?!?), I even ordered the software that was available for my meter (One Touch Ultra Mini ... like Syndee's). It allows you to connect the meter by way of a USB cable ($39 ... over priced ... only available from One Touch ... the RATS!) and load all your readings into the program. One of the simple charts it produced showed me that most of my trouble was in the morning and that I do well for the rest of the day. Very helpful.

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5407
   Posted 8/12/2008 8:40 AM (GMT -7)   
Wow, serious business.  I made my own chart on Word for two reasons:  I'm a teacher and more comfortable doing tables/charts that way, and I always have an initial fear of different computer programs.  In any case, with a very detailed daily chart, I knew absolutely how and what the meals I ate affected my blood sugar.  I also noted the exercise.  Mornings may be tough for everyone.  We eat dinner no later than 7 on normal days.  For me dinner is some kind of meat/chicken/fish and 2 vegetables, some pieces of hard cheese, cucumber slices or radishes with or without lettuce in a salad.  And a glass of wine.  (I don't take diabetes meds, so this is fine.)  Portions are important.  I realized early that more portions were a problem, so I really cut down on them.  In the evening, I'll drink tea with Equal and maybe 1/2 plain yogurt flavored with artificial sweetener.  Fasting the next morning will nearly always be less than 90. 

Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds


TVEditor
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2008
Total Posts : 481
   Posted 8/12/2008 11:06 AM (GMT -7)   
I guess however we do it, keeping tabs on all the readings is the important thing.
 
After Googling "diabetes software free", I found this among others:
 
 
There seems to be a wealth of diabetes & diet related programs out there.  I suppose its a case of buyer beware ... especially when they're free but most look reputable.
 
I'm going to give a few of 'em a try and report back once I've tried them out.
 
BTW:  If anyone wants help installing programs or making them work, let me know.

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5407
   Posted 8/12/2008 11:12 AM (GMT -7)   
Actually, my new Bayer Contour as the capability to be hooked up to the computer for this reason but I've never done it.  Today maybe most of the meters come with this.

Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds


ericsmom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 1042
   Posted 8/12/2008 11:50 AM (GMT -7)   
hmmmmmmmmmmm confused   If my BG was 7.1 before a meal, I would skip the meal, except maybe some raw veggies.  Isn't 7.1 what it should be approx? 2 hours after you eat?  That's what I thought anyway.  I never eat unless my level is at least 4.3 but not lower of course.
 
Lanie?
Fibromyagia, R/A, Diabetes, Atrial Fib, depression

folic acid, metformin, diamicron, bisoprolol, fenofibrate, pantoloc, wellbutrin, propafenone, ibprofen, warfarin, methotrexate


Some people dream of angels, I held one in my arms


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5407
   Posted 8/12/2008 12:22 PM (GMT -7)   
Well, here again is where the discrepancy between what many doctors and nutritionists say versus what most of us here on the Forum think.  I'd say that 7.1 before a meal is high and I'd probably eat just a piece of chicken.  That 7.1 would tell me I'm running higher than I should so I'd have to either change what I've been eating or change the amount of what I've been eating.  The reason I quit going to the nutritionist after I was diagnosed was she followed the food pyramid and was pushing too many carbs - all of which I found out drove my blood sugar higher.  They presume that people on meds could correct that with meds adjustment?  confused   I don't know.  I figured my life was in my hands, not theirs, so I'm controlling it my way.  wink

Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds


TVEditor
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2008
Total Posts : 481
   Posted 8/12/2008 1:18 PM (GMT -7)   

In the 2 weeks after I saw the nutritionist, I managed to bring down my after-meal numbers from 16 to around 6-8.  The before-meal numbers have been pretty steady at around 7 or 8.  Whenever I have dipped below 6, I needed a power nap like you wouldn't believe.  I started to suspect that this is when I need a snack & sure enough, the last time it happened, I grabbed a granola bar & didn't feel the need for sleep anymore.

Since I haven't been prescribed any meds yet, I'm just doing some experimenting with diet to see what 'my normals' are.  I thought I was getting a handle on things and starting a downward trend in the numbers but when I saw the nurse, all she noted were the high numbers (above 7) in my log book.  So, I guess, 7 is high but for me it is better than when I started.  That's my approach to all this -- slow but sure improvement.

I hope the medical profession agrees with me tongue


ericsmom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 1042
   Posted 8/12/2008 2:26 PM (GMT -7)   
You know...maybe it's the "guy" thing.  When I was going to the clinic for Diabetes awareness, right in the pamphlet were some sample menus. 2 seperate recipes..one for men, and one for the women. The men's portions were noticeably more generous than was allowed for the women. rolleyes    So perhaps, a 7 for you is normal pre-meal level.  I just know that you losing 8 lbs already, and educating yourself, diabetes isnt going to control you either!  You are doing great!! For me...levels of 3.8 and lower make me feel very ill. Level 6 for me, would just mean the level is dropping nicely since my last meal. 
 
Same with me Lanie, I think it's just general info they can give you.  I wish I could eat more carbs, but they really spike my levels too.  I also notice that I rarely get high levels anymore...a high for me is 8, once it goes a few points above that, I get really nervous.  For quite awhile I was walking around with sugar levels of 35...that was the highest reading on the meter...so maybe it was higher than that. smhair
 
Hugs
Diane
Fibromyagia, R/A, Diabetes, Atrial Fib, depression

folic acid, metformin, diamicron, bisoprolol, fenofibrate, pantoloc, wellbutrin, propafenone, ibprofen, warfarin, methotrexate


Some people dream of angels, I held one in my arms


TVEditor
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2008
Total Posts : 481
   Posted 8/12/2008 4:39 PM (GMT -7)   
"So perhaps, a 7 for you is normal pre-meal level."

Well, I'm still too ignorant to know better, as far as the docs are concerned, but I feel better so I think I'm on the right track. Like everyone here, I'm sure, there's a lot more going on behind the scenes than what appears in type.

My Dad raised me like a Viking. Vikings (like me) used to (way back in June of 2008) eat a couple of eggs, a stack 'o pancakes, a slab 'o ham, 16 oz. of milk and a cuppa coffee for Sunday breakfast. Unfortunately, it took Dad a heart attack, a stroke and a side of diabetes to realise that us modern Vikings don't do as much running around as the guys from the old country used to. Dad's still around ... 79 in a couple of months ... Mom too ... 81 this year and darn near beat me in a round of golf last week ... Vikings and Vikingettes are tough stock ... you should meet my little sister ... when she yells, bark falls off trees!)

Editor's Note: A story that made my doc laugh out loud (no easy thing to do):

I told him about my Dad's Dad (a blacksmith); sometime around 1930, his doctor told him he was diabetic.

"What does that mean?", he asked.
"Well, that means you can't use sugar.", the doc replied.
"OK."

He went home, threw out all the sugar in the house and ate nothing but farm-fresh honey as a sweetener for the rest of his life. Smoked like a chimney, drank rye whiskey, yelled at the TV when the soccer match reception was poor and made it to 69 with no meds or treatments. Of course there was the daily walk to the shop where he lifted steel, iron and horses for a living so I guess that says a bunch about exercise?

A fellow diabetic & good friend once told me:

"When you're born, you're given a piece of string that's just so long and when you get to the end of the string, that's it. If you work at it once in a while, you can make the string a little longer but if you spend all your time thinking about the string, you'll miss a lot of things. That's what makes life interesting."

I like this outlook. I find that the more time I spend worrying about numbers and doctors (I absolutely know that my doc is not typing a message on a forum about me right now ... no, I'm not psychic), the more my stomach hurts and the more I eat and the more the numbers go up ..............

... so right now, I'm just trying to put things in perspective.

Thanks to the Dianes, Lanies and everyone else around here, I think that's going to be easy to do :-)

Oh yeah; one other thing ... you've got to have a sense of humor! A 4 foot 2 x 4 with spikes on the end of it will also do the job ... but there's usually a lot more paperwork associated with that solution tongue

Chris

P.S. Is there a limit to the amount of talking allowed here? Once I get started, I'm hard to stop.

NO! Really?!? yup

ericsmom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 1042
   Posted 8/12/2008 5:12 PM (GMT -7)   
turn   Vikings are funny... smilewinkgrin
Fibromyagia, R/A, Diabetes, Atrial Fib, depression

folic acid, metformin, diamicron, bisoprolol, fenofibrate, pantoloc, wellbutrin, propafenone, ibprofen, warfarin, methotrexate


Some people dream of angels, I held one in my arms


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5407
   Posted 8/12/2008 5:37 PM (GMT -7)   
Chris, for most people in those days, life demanded more physical action and all that activity (ok, let's call it exercise) helped keep blood sugar in check for type 2 diabetics.  Even in my own generation (and I'm 59), we were more active as kids on a daily basis than kids today.  Larger meals were probably more easily worked off then.  Wow, we could talk about the past forever. eyes    Dealing with the reality now was a hard adjustment for me and probably everyone here when told they're diabetic, but just as I got used to computers and cell phones, I got used to changing my diet and lifestyle and so far I've been keeping normal levels.  It's not easy because sometimes I want to be lazy.  sad    I have to say though that knowledge is power and I've learned so much here, other places online and just by testing that I doubt I'd go back to my old eating style.  Sure, I miss some of the food but the monitor keeps me on track.  Everyone is wonderful here, sharing their own experiences and advice, so we don't feel like we're on this road alone.  (Yeah, there's a limit to talking here, and we're not supposed to go "off-topic" but let's call this support therapy.) smurf   And, well, Vikings sure were interesting.  Funny?  smhair
Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds


TVEditor
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2008
Total Posts : 481
   Posted 8/12/2008 7:30 PM (GMT -7)   
Thanks for the 'support therapy' leeway Lanie.

The last 30 days for me have been, shall we say, interesting. My defense mechanism is comedy ... or more to the point, 'whistling past the graveyard'. I believe in what I type and intend to keep trying to 'practice what I preach'. This is proving to be more difficult than I thought. Words like amputation' and 'blindness' scare the h*** out of me (I've been using hearing aids for a long time now and the potential loss of more senses worries me).

I infer that it is bad manners to run off at the mouth about the good ole days of eating anything you wanted and will endeavor to rein myself in when that urge surfaces.

The Viking thing is just a nod to my Dad; he's more like the comic strip Viking (Hagar) ... bark is worse than his bite, if you know what I mean, but there's something to what he says ... something to what everybody says ... if you listen and pay attention (Note to me: I should try that more often). I suspect that all his advice really amounts to 'nothing is insurmountable.'

I very much admire your handling of the whole thing and hope I haven't offended.

Sincerely,

Chris

P.S. Due to my field of work, I am occasionally asked "Should I buy a plasma or LCD HD TV?" I usually reply "Get a cardboard box and find a snow-covered hill. Slide down the hill in the box. It is much more rewarding." Some problems I don't understand.

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5407
   Posted 8/12/2008 9:08 PM (GMT -7)   

Gee, Chris, seems like we have more in common.  I also wear hearing aids, a legacy from my mother's side as well as the diabetes.  And without a doubt facing that for the first time a few years ago had me kicking and screaming all the way home from the audiologist.  It began to seem I was really following in my mother's (and grandmother's) footsteps when the diabetes came up, but I was determined to face it (after several months' denial) because it killed them both.  My mother died of a heart attack in the hospital after they amputated a leg at the knee.  She did not eat right and made no effort to exercise.  So, I decided I was going to do everything to stop the progression of the disease.  It's not that I'm opposed to taking meds if I have to (I already take BP meds but the dosage is too strong now, so I've got to see the doc.) but if I can control this without them, I prefer that.  My last A1c was 5.6 and I hope to get it even lower if I can.  It gets easier, honest.   :-)

(Gosh I miss sledding.  I grew up in NY with lots of nice snowy winters.  We don't get that in Memphis. cry )


Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds


TVEditor
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2008
Total Posts : 481
   Posted 8/13/2008 1:02 PM (GMT -7)   
S'funny, I never had a problem with the hearing aid deal. I couldn't hear things right ... they gave me the aids ... and I could hear. Problem solved.

Not like diabetes.

Oh, there was a bit of ribbing and attempted social discomfort aimed at me ...

"Are those hearing aids you're wearing?!?"
"Why yes, they are. Are those seeing aids you're wearing?" ( glasses ;-)

... but I didn't let it bother me.


I can understand missing sledding, but do you miss shovelling? ... chipping ice off your windshield? ... getting stuck in a snowbank?

The snow is always whiter on the other side of the fence ;-)
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