article: Diabetes rates double in 10 years

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LanieG
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Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5408
   Posted 10/30/2008 6:05 PM (GMT -7)   
The statements in this article should not surprise us, but I have a few comments.  Sometimes, data can be misleading.  I believe more people are diagnosed with diabetes today for a couple of reasons: 1) health organizations have lowered the blood sugar level parameters to identify diabetics.  This is a good thing.  In years past doctors would say fasting should be below 126, now they're suggesting below 100.  This alone will "catch" more people.  And 2), In addition, yes, there are more overweight people today than there were 50 years ago.  I believe it does a patient a disservice to allow him/her to coast from year to year with elevated blood sugar that falls around 125 because it was considered "borderline".  Having fasting numers like that is not normal and should be addressed, the sooner the better.  A fasting blood sugar of 125 would mean much higher (and more dangerous) post prandial blood sugar.  If that is allowed to continue for years, internal organs may be damaged.  This can be avoided in many cases if the patient must monitor the blood sugar before the levels climb higher and higher.  Intervention.  If the patient cannot control the blood sugar by diet, then prescribe meds.  In my own case, I did have "elevated" blood sugar every year for at least 5 years and was "borderline" with fasting blood sugar between 115 and 130.  Finally, 2 years ago I was prescribed a meter.  Although I balked at first, now I wish I'd had the meter many more years before.  I believe doctors need to be more aggressive in diagnosing diabetes and potential diabetes to avoid health problems later.  What do you all think?
 
 
 


Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds

Post Edited (LanieG) : 10/30/2008 7:12:16 PM (GMT-6)


TVEditor
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2008
Total Posts : 481
   Posted 11/3/2008 6:00 PM (GMT -7)   
Yeah, I agree Lanie. It infuriates me when I think of how long I went without the understanding of my condition. How many years did I do damage to my body when I would have been perfectly willing and able to make some changes that I now know are quite easy for me. Lest this sound like bragging; I am still a smoker and have a devil of a time coming to grips with quitting. Strangely, this diabetes thing is comparatively simple and is providing a plan for me that will lead to 'butting out' quite soon. I find that the more knowledge I gain, the more I understand how my smoking, high blood pressure and diabetes all link together. Clearly, I see how to 'kill many birds with one stone', if you take my meaning. Losing weight is the first, best step towards getting the upper hand on these beasties.

Editor's note: I am currently helping a director friend produce a video to do with anti-smoking. Instead of introducing the program with the usual 'Smoking is bad for you Johnnie' rhetoric, he chose to use an aboriginal elder talking to youths ... explaining that ABUSE and OVERUSE of MANY things is bad. The elder's message is that of MODERATION and the advice that once moderation is achieved, you have control. After that, it is up to you to continue or quit. I told my friend that, as an overuser of many things ( OOOOHHH .... gumdrops!!!!), this way of sending out a message appealed to me on an intelligent level. I wish these doctors and nutritionists would follow suit.

Stupid, I think, that our medical professionals allow us to 'coast' as you say. To what end? A time saving? It is you and I that must make time to go for the lab tests / follow-ups and make the lifestyle changes. How long does it take a doctor to scribble out the requests for the tests? (4.5 seconds -- I timed him ;-) I've already posted my doubts about the level of personal case involvement and the more I think about it, the more it spurs me on to use common sense as a guideline as opposed to taking the medical pros 'by-the-book' approach.

It is silly that amateurs such as ourselves can merely read or converse and by doing so, stumble across a simple thing such as changing one's diet to deal with a serious condition. Easy concept but difficult to implement. Still -- it works.

Meegwetch,

Chris

P.S. 'Meegwetch' basically means 'Live long and prosper' in Ojibway

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5408
   Posted 11/4/2008 7:41 AM (GMT -7)   

Now that I know what I know, I also think it's puzzling why most doctors don't get patients like us under more control of blood sugar by diet and exercise and just plain information rather than wait until we have to be on meds. I got handed pamphlets from the ADA and AHA about diet - which would ensure that my blood sugar would remain high.  Well, we've been through all that.

I hope you can quit smoking.  My brother and sister did it cold turkey but my son used the patch.  My parents couldn't quit but they only made half-hearted attempts.  Fortunately I never started.   

Meegwetch, (I like that. :-) )

 


Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds


Phishbowl
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 547
   Posted 11/4/2008 1:58 PM (GMT -7)   
We live in a time of gluttony and excess and have never learned to manage it (speaking mostly of "western" world). Even despite the current economic downturn we are experiencing, we are (mostly) not having to ration food products, ease our gas consumption much, pluck our own chickens and many other drastic things that have been done in the past out of necessity. For the most part, we get what we want, when we want it and few obstacles stand in our path.

I believe we live in a culture that promotes the "consume" message. If you want it you can have it. Better yet, you should have it. Even better, own this, go there, buy that, and eat these things and you'll be so happy you can't stand yourself but everyone wishes they were you, Mr. Jones. There are a lot of unhappy people these days because of all the conflicting messages. These are the same people who don't have the time to step back or have who've got so used to other people thinking for them that they can't conceive ownership of themselves and the choices they make. It's a whole lot easier following orders than leading the team - even a team of one.

These are also the same people when told they can't have/must drastically reduce 75% of their current diet.... they balk and say (to themselves at least), "NO WAY"- no can do. Some try/ make some effort but this seems to be the attitude of the majority of diagnosed diabetics. I think many of the doctors & nurses are so used to this response that they treat us all accordingly - at first anyway :-)

I DO think doctors can be more aggressive in some areas that will push the PATIENT into becoming more involved & self-aware: a log book is a must, an appointment with a Dietician/Nutritionist, Diabetes-related material (recipes, products, drug info, web sites, etc.). Most of all... an actual 90-day meal plan as a prescription (portions can be easy adjusted/substituted to suit the individual). At least it's a starting point and that seems to be what is most lacking for the newly diagnosed - information about food.

Don't shoot me for anything I said - I'm in a mood (maybe going low?). Guess I should go check that, eh? :-) I'll reread later and clarify my ramblings if necessary. Gotta bring up the smoking thing, too. I'm just so unmotivated to quit (sigh, I know). Back L8R.

Kris
Cheers,
- Phishbowl (Type 1 since Jan'05 - Levemir, NovoRapid)
"What's Not Measured Is Not Managed"

"It is impossible for a man to learn what he thinks he already knows"-Epictetus


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5408
   Posted 11/4/2008 2:03 PM (GMT -7)   
Kris, can I vote for you for President?
Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 11/5/2008 12:16 AM (GMT -7)   
Kris,
I'm not sure that there are very many doctors or even nutritionists who really understand the implications of the ADA standby diet. Although the original western-style food plan will kill us young, it appears that the ADA food plan will only just kill us more slowly! shocked

Can't remember where, but somewhere I read that using meds to keep blood glucose down without changing the food patterns or exercise levels... that the blood vessel and organ damage continues. I don't understand either why the medical profession doesn't push the truth instead of more medicine. I'm aware that I need some meds to stay in line, but whew! It can be a never ending cycle!
~ Jeannie, Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
I know God will not give me anything I can't handle. I just wish that He didn't trust me so much. ~Mother Teresa

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


Phishbowl
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 547
   Posted 11/5/2008 12:44 PM (GMT -7)   
While I certainly wouldn't disagree with you, Jeannie, I also think many of them have become jaded and frustrated with patient's negative responses to "today is the first day of the rest of your life".

I think the ADA/CDA diet is a compromised approach - on many levels. It appeases "big corporation" (agriculture, dairy, pharmaceutical, gov't, etc.), but it also appeases the unwillingness on the patient's part to drastically change their lives. I think, given the choice, most people opt for the 'slight modification to lifestyle with (ever increasing) meds' over the 'drastic lifestyle change and long education process of optimal living'. I know I did at first. Knowledge is power and with power comes responsibility. I hate to sound so negative but, I think most people just don't want any more responsibilities. Life is too fast as it is; no time. "Gimme the quick fix". We're "consumers" (and referred by as much). We're a McDonald's society where everything is based on convenience.

I think we've got a lot of things backwards. My hope is that our successive generations maybe slow down a bit, have an appreciation for (among other things) WHERE food comes from/how it's made and how what we put in our mouths affects our whole body. I'd like to see children better educated in food & nutrition, biology, civics, and home economics to name a few. I know I'm disillusioned with "people" these days so, I'll get off my rant before I start :-) .

I agree with you too, Lanie & Chris - why aren't they even more aggressive with getting patient's on the right path? I can only say in my experiences, I was left to my own devices. In other words, I was given the information but, it was up to me to use or not use it. When originally diagnosed as Type2, I thought it was all about sugar. Eat more healthily, cut out sugar and all will be well. I didn't really have a clue (compared to now). When I was handed my insulin & needles on the day I was diagnosed as Type1, I was again left to my own devices with the new tools I'd been given. Smack! "Today is the first day of the rest of your life!". OK so, I didn't have a choice anymore. I had to become an artificial pancreas - and learn how one worked. I'm still learning :-)

I like (love) the 4-5 smokes a day I have. I'll have to bring up another topic about smoking and get your ideas :-) Ciao for now!
Kris
Cheers,
- Phishbowl (Type 1 since Jan'05 - Levemir, NovoRapid)
"What's Not Measured Is Not Managed"

"It is impossible for a man to learn what he thinks he already knows"-Epictetus


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 11/7/2008 1:46 PM (GMT -7)   
I agree so heartily with everything said... But it's kind of like stupid eating habits are the big orange elephant in the corner of the room. Everyone sees it there but they just ignore it. Westerners overeat, so lets bombard them with 500 ad messages a day pushing processed, fried, carb laden, sugar coated, extruded, processed pure crap. Why, if the alcohol peeps have to put "drink responsibly" messages in their ads don't the crap food peeps have to put, "balance this with fresh vegetables and clean water" in their ads? How can we stand up to the whole carb industry for our children? Why arent' there ads for apples or green beans? Why isn't there a squash council the way there is a snack food council? Where are the carrot producers when you need them?

WHY DOES IT HAVE TO BE SO DARNED HARD ALL THE TIME?!?!?!

Sorry for the rant. I'm having trouble staying on target with my food plan.
~ Jeannie, Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
I know God will not give me anything I can't handle. I just wish that He didn't trust me so much. ~Mother Teresa

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5408
   Posted 11/7/2008 7:01 PM (GMT -7)   
It's the me me me me first generation.  I think those of us who grew up post WWII were probably the last of the traditional family lifestyle, and as adults with kids we ended up with a hectic lifestyle filled with jobs, after school and evening activities, conveniences in the house and new kinds of pre-packaged food along with "fast" food - none of which existed when I was growing up.  Meals have become hastily put together or eaten on the run and sometimes not with the entire family.  I believe this combination created the modern lifestyle which signaled the demise of the family dinner, a dinner which served fresh vegetables, not mystery food from a box.  When my daughter was in high school (she's 24 now), she wanted to have a friend over for dinner because he didn't believe we cooked dinner every night and sat down as a family to eat.  Once a week we'd order pizza for the kids. Wow. Yes, there's too much junk food on the shelves, vending machines, etc. but don't forget we decide what goes on the dinner table.  We set the style for our kids, so if dinner everynight is take-out, our kids learn that's how dinners are.  If we spend time making dinner with fresh food, that's what the kids learn.  I think I'd be a lot worse off now with my blood sugar if we had been eating convenience food and take-out all these years.  (TG my husband likes home-cooked food and he cooks, too.) It's not the responsibility of the food industry to teach my kids to eat fresh fruit and vegetables; it's mine.  But we have to make it available.  School lunches have to be healthy; they have to get rid of the vending machines.  It's too easy to grab a donut and soda or some KFC. The learning begins in the home (like discipline .... I'm a teacher...) first and hopefully is reinforced when the kids are at school.  But like smoking and drinking, there's the crappy fast food/junk food industry out there that's so attractive.  Jeannie, I hear you about staying on target.  I've been straying and not happy about it either.  After slapping myself a few times, I'm getting back on track now because I don't want to undo the progress I've made.  It's a never-ending battle and I hate it.  mad
Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 11/8/2008 9:54 AM (GMT -7)   
I hate it too. sad It's the second anniversary of my dad's death, and I just "celebrated" another birthday. I'm lower than a snakes belly so there is nowhere to go but up... Just wish that foods didn't figure so strongly in my moods.
~ Jeannie, Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
I know God will not give me anything I can't handle. I just wish that He didn't trust me so much. ~Mother Teresa

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


TVEditor
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2008
Total Posts : 481
   Posted 11/9/2008 4:13 PM (GMT -7)   
I think I know how you feel Jeannie. Although I'm lucky enough to still have my dad around, I'm watching him waste away (diabetes, heart attack, stroke) day by day.

I produce TV commercials every day and see/hear a LOT of hypocrisy. I find that I get the most relaxation at home when I TURN OFF MY TV. A friend of mine once told me that she thought her TV was dissolving her brain so she sold it. Well, she (like me) always wears a tinfoil hat to keep the radiation/government/aliens out of her (our) brain so her (our) advice may not be sound but nevertheless, I (we) recommend it.

Chris

P.S. Don't tell my boss what I just said -- I still have a whopping mortgage to pay off!
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