Newly diagnosed - How bad is it?

New Topic Locked Topic Printable Version
52 posts in this thread.
Viewing Page :
 1  2  3 
[ << Previous Thread | Next Thread >> ]

teamanfl
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2009
Total Posts : 19
   Posted 1/11/2009 11:12 AM (GMT -7)   
I was told by my doc that I am a diabetic. MY fasting blood sugar is 145. I don't have any symptoms. I am on meds for high cholesterol and Emphysema. My liver functions are OK. He advised me to keep off sugar. He said if I did not improve with diet, he would prescribe some sort of meds for the problem. BTW, he told me this twice. In other words, two blood tests in a row gave these indications. The two blood tests before were 6 months apart. He has me scheduled for a blood test to follow again up in 60 days.
Should I get a second opinion or just go on yet another pill? Any other thoughts?
TeamanFL

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5404
   Posted 1/11/2009 4:50 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi, welcome teamanfl.  Well, of course you're free to get a second opinion if you want.  However, from what you wrote, I'd say you'd still have high readings of blood sugar.  145 is not critical but you should be concerned and it's a good thing the doctor is because if this goes on for years and/or creeps higher, you might very well start seeing common symptoms of diabetes.  145 was your fasting blood sugar, so imagine how high it is after you eat and at other times during the day.  I'd suggest following what the doctor says and carrying it further by cutting way down on other carbohydrates like bread, potatoes, pasta, rice.  Eat more vegetables (not corn or potatoes), salads, meats and poultry.  Doing this will help keep the blood sugar lower.  It will also help you lose weight if you need to.  Both of these will be better for the heart, too.  So, that's my suggestion!  wink



Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds

Post Edited (LanieG) : 1/11/2009 5:56:33 PM (GMT-7)


SmurfyShadow
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 2386
   Posted 1/12/2009 1:18 AM (GMT -7)   
You know hon, there are diabetic classes you can ask your doctor to put you in. It helped me a lot. I learned how to count my carbohydrates, and what I personally needd for a carb intake a day. Not only should you change your dieet, but you should exercise. I go to the gym when I have the stregth (I also have an auto immune disease and do a form of chemo.) If you listen to the doctors, even if its meds first (I started with Metformin) you can actually drop your fasting score and be healtheir. I was diagnosed when i was 5.8 (it was a lucky catch). Due to listening and applying what I learned I'm now at 5.2. If I applied more, I can probably drop it even more.

teamanfl
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2009
Total Posts : 19
   Posted 1/12/2009 7:55 AM (GMT -7)   
Thanks for the input. Tell me the best place to get more info on diet. My doc did not give me a diet, just told me to stay off sweets. I have seen diets on the Internet, but they are a bit extreme. I don't think my numbers demand such a strict diet.
I am a member of a gym and exercise at least 3 times each week. I do 50 ab crunches at 50 pounds; 30 minutes at a 5 on the nustep; and lots of stretches. I also have a treadmill at my house. I do a half mile every other day.
I also have emphysema so I can't do really strenuous stuff. As long as it's slow and steady, I'm OK.

TeamanFL

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5404
   Posted 1/12/2009 12:32 PM (GMT -7)   
Wow, sounds like you're doing a lot of strength training as well as cardio and considering you have emphysema, that's very impressive!  As far as diet, you can look up 'low carb' which is as I described earlier.  Eat all vegetables except potatoes.  Eat all kinds of meat, fish and poultry.  Eat limited amounts of beans (or other legumes) and if you eat any grains make sure they're "whole grain" or "whole berry".  Stay away from corn.  Eat nuts.  Be careful with fruit since it does have natural sugar.  If you are measuring your blood sugar at home, be sure to do this 2 hours after you eat so you know what impact certain food has on your blood sugar.  Generally speaking carbs will drive it up. It's difficult to tell you exactly what you cannot eat since everyone's body metabolizes carbs (sugar) differently.  Since you have had two high fasting blood sugar results, I'd suggest getting a blood glucose meter (if you don't have one), so you know how your blood sugar is.   

Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds


teamanfl
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2009
Total Posts : 19
   Posted 1/13/2009 7:50 AM (GMT -7)   
Selmer

Yes, I did smoke for over 30 years, but quit in 2000.

My weight is 175. I am 5 ft 6 in tall and 66 years old.

I have 2 stents in my right coronary artery (put there in 2000). A recent drug induced stress test and subsequent heart catheterization showed no significant blockage. I am taking Vytorin every day for cholesterol.

Right now I am eating “half meals”. My wife usually splits meals with me. I have stopped eating sweets except at Christmas and on my birthday. I eat lots of fish and eat fried foods no more than once each week. When I say diets are too strict, I mean that I have not committed to NO carbs or to NO sweets at all. Not only that but I refuse to weigh my food before I eat it. I also refuse to weigh myself in front of 100 people each week. I also resist counting carbs. That sounds ridiculous to me. I can not commit to counting anything about my food, especially calories. It is just too complicated for me. My memory is way too poor for that. I can not cook and most of the “diets” force me to cook for myself. That isn’t going to happen. I eat out about 12 times a week and I am not willing to give that up. Has anyone ever written a book about how to diet while eating out?

There must be a practical way to control blood sugar without having to do math while standing on my head, rubbing my stomach, patting my head, and whistling.

I am not making light of my situation, I am just not capable of doing some of the things that seam to be required of me. Does anyone understand what I have said here? Does anyone here have as poor a memory as me? Should I just go away?

TeamanFL

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5404
   Posted 1/13/2009 10:29 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi teamanfl, gosh I agree with you about counting those things.  I don't count or weigh anything either.  I just stay away from the food that I know raises my blood sugar.  Eating out has not been a problem for me.  When entrees come with the predicted potatoes or rice (or other carb), I ask them to substitute another vegetable.  I have never encountered a server or restaurant that won't do that.  They usually substitute green beans or bell peppers.  Other vegetables are fine too:  cauliflower, eggplant....  However, I do not order a pasta dish for this reason.  I don't consider this a "diet".  It's my way of eating.  This way of eating, which I've described to you above, has 1) kept my blood sugar near normal, 2) helped me lose weight and 3) lowered my cholesterol.  I've been eating this way for two years and my lab tests have been so good that my doctor writes "excellent" and "fantastic" on the copies that her office sends me.  I always request copies of the lab tests so I can see trends and each time has been an improvement.  I also do cardio exercise and strength training including lifting weights.  These exercises help the body in many ways including the control of blood sugar.  So, you see, I do not stand on my head, rub my stomach........ smurf   Honest.

Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds


SmurfyShadow
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 2386
   Posted 1/13/2009 11:22 PM (GMT -7)   
There are no diets that can help diabetics. To us, its a lifehood of diet. You can have things, but in MODERATION. Rice, fried food, breads, pastas, potatoes, fries, cereals, etc all have high carbs. You are a healthy eater, you just need to learn how to modify your eating..hence the clases to teach. You have to make healthy choices of what to eat. Hey if your still hungry after eating your meal, have a nice garden salad...without dressing. Find out what are considered "freebies" for us to eat as much as we want.

Your doctor warned you before you had to start insulin, or something even more serious like having a leg amputated. If you dont take care of diabetes, you can die. I held my boyfriends brother after he had his leg amputated, slipped in a diabetic coma and died. Why? Because he did NOT listen to the doctors and take care of his diabetes. My boyfriend had been enstrangled with his brother, I made him march into that hospital room (I drug him in lol) and forced him to say he forgave him and loved him. It was a good thing I forced him to do that, John died while we were there, holding his hands. Now, if you dont want to take the time to count carbs, or make better choices...just think of your wife, Sir.

I wish you and your wife the best.
Smurfy Shadow
 
DX: Wegener's Disease, Migraines, Diabetese Type II, PCOS, Lactose Intolerant, Benign Heart Murmer, Asthma, Asperger's Syndroe, Necrotizing Gramultous Inflamation in eye, A.D.D., Acid Reflux


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5404
   Posted 1/14/2009 5:09 PM (GMT -7)   
teamanfl, I'm sorry that some of the responses to you have been discouraging.  HealingWell is committed to trying to help with personal experience and encouraging members in a positive way.  There should not be any chastising here.  Smurfyshadow is not correct by saying "there are no diets that can help diabetics".  It is a proven fact that carbohydrates drive blood sugar up.  If you are a diabetic like me, someone who might be called "borderline" because our blood sugar doesn't always run high enough to be put on meds, you can help yourself to control your blood sugar by not eating refined carbohydrates as I mentioned in my responses above. I have been controlling my blood sugar for two years by eating exactly as I've described: meat/fish/chicken, vegetables (not potatoes), salads, nuts and cheese.  However, it is a person's choice to eat as his wishes.  Speaking personally, I do not want to have diabetic-related medical problems like heart disease, kidney disease, neuropathy, etc., so I test my blood sugar a couple of times a day.  Do I ever go off the plan?  Yes.  Birthdays, holidays, etc. but in between times, I'm back on track on the way of eating which controls my blood sugar.  All I can say is, "Don't be discouraged".  You can still eat out at the same time following an eating plan which will bring your blood sugar down.  It is in the interest for your best health to have a blood sugar meter so you can see how you're doing on a daily basis.  Good luck!  :-)  

Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds


SmurfyShadow
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 2386
   Posted 1/15/2009 1:37 AM (GMT -7)   
Lanie, the next sentence....I said to us its a lifehood of diet. And if you read his posts, he does not want to count carbs. Its his choice hon, so I was just explaining to him the cons of his choices. Cant change a person who doesnt want to change. Why I say its a lifehood of diet? Let me think....I'm the 4th diabetic in my immediate family of 8 people, I've found others comatose in my family, in fact, I'm the only one in my family who listend to the doctors and went to the classes. And, I'm the only one who is on Metformin alone (everyone else is metformin and insulin). And it is a lifehood of diet, cuz we are stuck as diabetics until either a cure or til we pass on. I was just trying to point out all the cons if he chooses to not help himself. So please Lanie, read the full thing in my posts next time. I'm sorry if I seemed overly pushy, I was only trying to get the point across. I, myself, first time I ever went in low blood sugar, I was on a city bus and managed to inform the driver I was diabetic and I needed help. Next, I was being shook like mad by paramedics. I heard someone yell "shes 42". I now listen to the doctors, and actually EAT my 3 meals verses my one meal. I even carry glucose in my purse, along with honey, and some hard candies.
Smurfy Shadow
 
DX: Wegener's Disease, Migraines, Diabetese Type II, PCOS, Lactose Intolerant, Benign Heart Murmer, Asthma, Asperger's Syndroe, Necrotizing Gramultous Inflamation in eye, A.D.D., Acid Reflux


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5404
   Posted 1/15/2009 8:21 AM (GMT -7)   
Smurfy, of course it's going to be a lifelong way of eating but choosing to eat food that does not raise blood sugar will help him avoid complications later on.  This is true for those on or not on meds.  Teaman is not on meds and is probably type 2 and is probably not experiencing lows.  Even eating moderate amounts of rice, potatoes, pasta will keep a person who is "borderline" in high blood sugar readings.  This is something to avoid.  As I said, it's important for everyone to monitor his blood sugar with a meter.  In this way, the person knows what his numbers are and how to eat better to avoid highs.  But a person has a choice:  if someone does not want to control his eating of the obvious carbs, then he most likely will end up on meds because of his constant high blood sugar.  It doesn't have to be that way, however.  Personally, I prefer to stay off meds as long as I can regulate my blood sugar with diet and exercise, which is what I'm encouraging Teaman to do.  This does not mean we have to count anything.  As I said, I don't count grams of carbs or calories and I don't weigh food either.  The meter is the instument that tells me how my choices are and this, all of this above, is what I'm trying to convey.  

Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds


teamanfl
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2009
Total Posts : 19
   Posted 1/15/2009 11:09 AM (GMT -7)   
Sounds like some of you are against any form of eating modification that does not involve a strict diet. Let me repeat myself:
- I do NOT have any symptoms
- My doctor has NOT put me on a diet
- My doctor has NOT put me on medication
- If I felt that my condition was life threatening, I WOULD go on a strict diet.
- I DO exercise
- I DO take all of the medication my doctors prescribe
- I do NOT skip medications for any reason
- I HAVE modified my eating by limiting my intake of sweets and of most other kinds of food too
- I DO love my wife and will NOT put myself in danger of leaving this Earth
- My doctor has NOT told me to test my own blood/sugar

I DO appreciate all of the advice that you folks have given me here.

Now, back to my questions:
*If I eat at a BBQ place and eat one slice of bread instead of two slices with my sliced pork, is that OK?
*If I eat at Red Lobster (seafood) and do not eat mashed potatoes or biscuits, is that OK?
*If I eat a hamburger, but not more than once every two weeks, and NO fries is that OK?
*If I eat a steak, but only with vegetables, is that OK?
*If I eat one doughnut every 3 months, is that OK?
*If I eat activia or some other type probiotic, is that OK?
*If I eat Life cereal with NO sugar, is that OK?
*If I have 2% milk, is that OK?

Any other suggestions for someone who does NOT cook?

Thanks in advance, TeamanFL

Phishbowl
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 547
   Posted 1/15/2009 1:43 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi Teaman,

First, a fasting blood sugar of 145 is high. In the diabetic range; not just slightly elevated. You indicate yourself that this was the case for the past while (previous 2 tests). Your doc is telling you that your body is having difficulty metabolizing carbs. Meaning every time you ingest them, your body struggles to metabolize them. It certainly doesn't mean you can't eat them but there is a way to be wise about it.

You seem to be living a fantastic lifestyle with exercise and being conscientious with food. Good on you for that! I don't doubt that it's that lifestyle that keeps your glucose numbers much lower than they could be without all your efforts.

So, here we come to it. You're doing well with what seems to be a pretty balanced lifestyle BUT all your efforts are not enough to keep your blood sugars within an acceptable range to avoid long-term complications. You have three choices: learn more about food and make some adjustments (what exactly is a carb anyway? portion control, etc.), or you can keep doing what you're doing and go on some meds that'll help your body perform better with keeping the glucose levels in check or a combination of both. Whatever you decide now just keep in mind... Diabetes is progressive. At some point in time you'll be faced with the same decision.

To your statements:

- I do NOT have any symptoms
*** If you mean things like excessive thirst/urination, etc..... you don't need to experience these to have diabetes. You do have at least one big symptom: high fasting blood sugars
- My doctor has NOT put me on a diet
*** He advised you to keep off sugar. What he should have said was carbs instead of sugar (carbs turn into sugar in your blood)
- My doctor has NOT put me on medication
*** But he's about to. He's giving you the choice to amend your diet if you can or medication will be necessary to keep those blood sugar levels in check.
- If I felt that my condition was life threatening, I WOULD go on a strict diet.
*** Maybe not immediately but, diabetes is progressive so at some point those high sugar levels will affect various other organs. Some might consider heart disease, kidney failure, neuropathy, or blindness to name a few, as life threatening.
- I DO exercise
*** can't tell you how far ahead that puts you with managing this diabetes. Keep up the fantastic work!
- I DO take all of the medication my doctors prescribe
*** Again, Bravo!
- I do NOT skip medications for any reason
*** Ditto
- I HAVE modified my eating by limiting my intake of sweets and of most other kinds of food too
*** Awesome! Now the trick to understanding diabetes is food and that it's not about "sugar" it's more specifically about carbs
- I DO love my wife and will NOT put myself in danger of leaving this Earth
*** very conscientious and responsible of you
- My doctor has NOT told me to test my own blood/sugar
*** Yet. It really is in your best interest to start testing. You'll probably get a script for a meter along with the Metformin. It's a gauge for telling you how you've been doing and/or what your next plans should be (where food choices are concerned).

To your questions:

*If I eat at a BBQ place and eat one slice of bread instead of two slices with my sliced pork, is that OK?
- Sure, if you think it is. How do you know? By testing your blood sugars after a meal.
*If I eat at Red Lobster (seafood) and do not eat mashed potatoes or biscuits, is that OK?
- If your limiting rice and pasta, too then, YES! Fresh seafood and veggies makes a great choice!
*If I eat a hamburger, but not more than once every two weeks, and NO fries is that OK?
- Get rid of the bun (or at least the top) and have a few fries :-)
*If I eat a steak, but only with vegetables, is that OK?
- Another awesome meal! Just watch the portion of steak.
*If I eat one doughnut every 3 months, is that OK?
- Sure, if you think it is
*If I eat activia or some other type probiotic, is that OK?
- Many tend to be high in carbs but, YES! Probiotic yogurts and other yogurts can be great snack options.
*If I eat Life cereal with NO sugar, is that OK?
- Cereals tend to be high in carbs and empty on nutrition, especially as breakfast. Wouldn't be as high or fast a sugar spike if you ate them with protein. (Sidebar: a cup of corn flakes will raise your blood sugar higher and faster than a teaspoon of table sugar).
*If I have 2% milk, is that OK?
- Better than skim or 1% (the lower the milk fat the higher the sugar). Keep the portions controlled. Milk is a food not a drink (high in carbs).

BTW, I'm not on any strict diet. I just keep learning what works for me. Only way I know that is by testing. Can't fly blind when it comes to Diabetes. You don't actually have to count carbs like I do (I inject insulin based on the number of carbs ingested), but learning about food can go a long way in successfully managing this disease.

Sorry for the long post but, I hope I've helped answer some of your questions :-)
Cheers,
- Phishbowl (Type 1 since Jan'05 - Levemir, NovoRapid)
"What's Not Measured Is Not Managed"

"It is impossible for a man to learn what he thinks he already knows"-Epictetus


SmurfyShadow
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 2386
   Posted 1/15/2009 8:48 PM (GMT -7)   
Team, I'm sorry if I seemed harsh. The thing that helped me the best was going to the diabetic classes and getting to know my body and taking my blood suagars. I can now tell when I get low, most of the time. I have this weird thing of saying "I feel funny" when I need to eat. I also sweat, shake, feel sick to stomach. When I got to know my body, and learned about classes, I was able to figure out those answers to the questions you asked. Unfortunally, there is no simple answer. You see, each diabetic is different. Some can control by diet and exercise, some by diet only, some by oral pills and diet,some by insulin and diet, some by insulin, oral pills and diet, some even use pumps. You dont take anything at this time, which is great. But the truth is your sugar is extermely high on a fasting test. So you can stay off of medication, and avoid complications you really just got to educate yourself and get to know your body. Its ok to go out, but you really need to monitor your bloodsugar in the process. Its ok to have a donut once a month, just watch your bloodsugar. So why not run over to fred myers and pick up a blood test kit? If you feel funny, take your bloodsugar. Before you eat, take your bloodsugar. 2 hours after you eat, take your blood sugar, before you go to bed, when you get up, take your blood sugar. Its recommended to test 6-8 times a day. A normal reading from the bloodtest kit should be 90-120.
Smurfy Shadow
 
DX: Wegener's Disease, Migraines, Diabetese Type II, PCOS, Lactose Intolerant, Benign Heart Murmer, Asthma, Asperger's Syndroe, Necrotizing Gramultous Inflamation in eye, A.D.D., Acid Reflux


teamanfl
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2009
Total Posts : 19
   Posted 1/16/2009 9:07 AM (GMT -7)   
I am very conflicted now. I have had both hardballs and softballs thrown at me here.
I have also gotten some good advice. As I see it I will do the following:
*Ask my doctor about classes on diabetes
*Check to see if I can get a testing meter without a prescription, if not ask my doc for an RX. If he says I don’t need it, I will not get it.
*Try to find out the difference between sugar and carbohydrates. Apparently you guys think carbs are worse than sugar. That is confusing to me. Sugar does not have to be converted to sugar, it already is sugar!

As far as the rest:
Smurfyshadow = I don’t know what 5.2 and 5.8 mean. I’ll ask my doc. Also asking about a class is a good idea. I had no idea that there were classes.

Selmer = Both my wife and myself are retired. She feels like cooking is a chore. We have enough money to eat out so we will continue. Sorry about your loss. I know at least 5 people who are on insulin, all but one eats what ever they want when we are out at a restaurant. I don’t plan to live like a robot. I WILL eat in moderation as I have been for a while, and learn what NOT to eat. I am NOT overweight. I weigh 168 pounds right now. I am 5 ft 6 in and 66 years old.

Phishbowl = You seam to emphasize checking blood often. I don’t know if I can even get a meter without a prescription. If I can, I don’t have any idea how much a meter costs. I will talk to my doc about that. If he does not recommend a meter, then I won’t use one. Are you telling me that if I eat a hamburger every TWO weeks I still have to throw out the bun? That is very, very extreme! Every TWO weeks!!! You attacked Life cereal. It has 25g of carbs (8% of daily recommended). My entire breakfast is Life cereal. I think 8% is pretty low for one meal. The box says it is heart healthy. What gives with you and Life cereal?

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5404
   Posted 1/16/2009 9:57 AM (GMT -7)   

Teaman, carbohydrates include sugar, anything made with sugar, flour, anything made with flour, potatoes as well as honey, molasses, high fructose corn syrup ....  Vegetables have varying degrees of carbs.  For example, peas carrots, potatoes, winter squash, beets are examples of vegetables with a lot of carbs.  Rice, all rice, will drive blood sugar up.  Most fruit are high in carbs though berries and cherries have less than bananas and oranges.  Beans have carbs but they also have fiber and this may slow down the effect of a blood sugar spike.  Grains, all grains and refined grain in particular, will drive blood sugar up.  I think if you read through some older posts about food here, you'll understand more about why diabetics stay away from these carbs.  Cereals are made from grains which are carbs.  Cereals have to add vitamins and minerals back to their formula because the refined flour (wheat, oat, corn...) is depleted from their original nutrients.  The bottom line is the amount of carbs.  The 25g of carbs in that cereal which says it's 8% of the RDA will drive a diabetic's blood sugar very very high, especially if he's not on medication.  This is a fact.  But since you don't test your blood sugar, you have no idea what it does to you.  You can get a free blood sugar monitor by going to the websites for Bayer and One Touch and probably others.  These free monitors will arrive with everything you need to test yourself but they only give about 10 free test strips, so this is why having a prescription is helpful, so you can get more test strips at lower cost. Medicare should cover this but I don't know because I just turned 60.  I was in denial about diabetes two years ago and I also didn't understand any of this.  If I didn't take control of my eating and test my blood sugar, I'd be on medication right now.  In all my responses to you, I've written what you can eat in order to control the blood sugar.  Your body is still producing insulin but it may not be using it effectively.  If you follow what Kris and I have been saying, you will probably bring your blood sugar levels down to acceptable levels.  I know all this information is new and hard to understand, or at least hard to accept, but you can't fight the facts.  I would suggest reading Dr. Richard Bernstein's Diabetes Solutions - this book will explain everything you need to understand.  Your two fasting blood tests are way over the cut off point used for diagnosing diabetes.  "Normal" fasting should be under 100, but for many years the American Diabetes Assoc. used 126 for diagnosing the disease and was very lax in its recommendations for diet.  This is changing now.

Please have an open mind and understand that we are giving you the information that will help you.  Kris is type 1 and I'm type 2 but the low-carb way of eating helps control the blood sugar regardless of the type.   



Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds

Post Edited (LanieG) : 1/16/2009 3:16:31 PM (GMT-7)


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5404
   Posted 1/16/2009 10:28 AM (GMT -7)   

about the numbers and tests:

Blood sugar meters have two different measurements for blood sugar depending on where you live.  In the US we use mg/dL but everyone else in the world uses   mmol/L.  When you get your meter, it's already preset, although you can switch it over to the other system if you want.  Generally, here in the states, fasting blood sugar should be under 100.  However, in the recent past, doctors were looking for readings under 126.  You will still find some doctors and even labs using the 126 as a cutoff point.  Testing during the day is also done about 2 hours after eating and here again you'll find different parameters as to what the doctor is looking for.  Some would say the 2-hour reading shouldn't be over 140, yet others are looking for 120.  In general the more conservative numbers will keep us healthier for many more years because when the body sustains blood sugar over 140 too many times for too long, there is damage to the internal organs (heart, kidneys).  Another blood test is called the A1c which is a simple blood test done in the lab.  This test tells us what the average blood sugar has been over the past 3 months.  This means we don't know just what the actual highs were or the lows, only the average.  In the US, doctors are looking for results under 6.0 on the A1c- but again you'll find differences in what doctors are looking for.  It used to be "under 6.6".

You do not need a prescription for a meter.  You can buy it off the shelf in any pharmacy but they are cheaper if they are prescribed by the doctor.  Also, as I wrote above, several manufacturers give them out free.  Google Bayer or One Touch (or others) or "free blood glucose meters".  However, you have to have supplies of the little test strips for the blood, so a prescription for that brand test strip is important.  If you're on Medicare, check out what benefits you have as far as meters.



Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds

Post Edited (LanieG) : 1/16/2009 11:34:36 AM (GMT-7)


teamanfl
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2009
Total Posts : 19
   Posted 1/16/2009 2:01 PM (GMT -7)   
I was an engineer before I retired. Because of that, I am a very logical person. It is not logical that 8% of RDA can spike blood sugar. This is going to be a LONG process. It is against my nature, but I will try to understand illogical things relating to diabetes.

Are there any foods that are 2% or 1% of RDA? Will that be OK? No need to answer. I'll go get Dr. Bernstein's Diabetes Solution and try to memorize it. Believe me, it has been a LONG time since I had to memorize anything.

It is also not logical that I see so many obese people and they are still eating much worse than I am. Why are they OK and Have to put up with this? No need to answer. I have never been lucky. On average, I have been unlucky. I have noticed lately (because of my pending strict diet) that MOST people are obese. Just my luck, I am the one with diabetes.

When I see my doc, I will ask many questions. If I don't get satisfactory answers, I will get a second opinion. Thanks for all of the help.

Phishbowl
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 547
   Posted 1/16/2009 2:36 PM (GMT -7)   
teaman,
The hamburger question: What I'm telling you is that you can reduce the number of carbs in your meal by taking away the bun(s) on your hamburger. Hamburger buns are highly-refined carbs - the worst kind for spiking blood sugars. Your body doesn't follow a calendar or maintain a log book of your meals. It reacts to what you've just ingested in an on-going basis.

The cereal thing: I did not attack Life cereal. YOU misunderstood. I said "cereals" tend to be high in carbs and empty in nutrition (other than what is chemically re-introduced in the processing). The majority of them, and certainly the more popular ones, are considered highly-refined carbs and high IN carbs. You would be better served if your breakfast was higher in protein and more balanced.

You definitely want to start reading about what carbohydrates (carbs) are. It will help your understanding immensely as to what are good and what are bad carb choices. To maybe help start you off with understanding the "sugar" thing....

- everything you eat is basically made up of 3 things: protein, fat, carbs
- sugar, for example, is a carb
- carbs convert to glucose in the blood. (Glucose is just another name for sugar. Anything ending is "ose" is sugar related: i.e. fructose)
- fat & protein convert too, but their digestion takes so long as to negligibly affect blood sugar levels.

- it is the glucose level in your blood stream that you want to keep as in range as possible. Avoiding blood sugar spikes means limiting carbs and eating them as part of balanced meas/snacks. Carbs period. Body doesn't care if they come in the form of highly refines carbs like breads and cereals or in more natural form like fruits for example.
- you want to balance any carbs you eat with fat & protein. Reduces the sugar spike by adding to & extending the digestion.
Cheers,
- Phishbowl (Type 1 since Jan'05 - Levemir, NovoRapid)
"What's Not Measured Is Not Managed"

"It is impossible for a man to learn what he thinks he already knows"-Epictetus


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 1/17/2009 1:25 AM (GMT -7)   
Teamanfl,
Sorry to be so tardy in welcoming you to HealingWell but I've got some busy stuff going on in my life and barely have time to sleep. My father and brother are engineers and I know that your mind views things a bit differently than the rest of us. Although this is great if you are building a bridge it doesn't help much with a disease like diabetes. Diabetes isn't logical or fair, nor does it play by any strict rules.

First, let me tell you that you didn't do anything to 'give yourself' diabetes. You were genetically programmed to eventually show up with symptoms as long as you are living in this type of 'plenty' environment. Diabetes is thought to be a survival factor for times of famine. If you lived 150 years ago and needed to saddle your horse or hitch up a wagon just to go to town to eat, chop wood for your stove, climb stairs and walk everywhere your caloric needs would pretty much balance out your food intake. Regular exercise helps but the overabundance of starches available to us makes our food choices difficult.

Do not wait until your doctor tells you to get a meter. This is kind of like waiting for the Oil Change shop to call you and tell you to come in for an oil change. You need clean oil to keep your car running longer. You make a conscious choice to get regular oil changes. ~ You need to know your blood glucose numbers to make good food decisions and keep your body running longer. You may purchase a meter for yourself without a prescription. This will give you a basis for understanding your numbers. I got the Prestige IQ online with 300 test strips for about $100. I have no insurance so this was a great deal for me.

I have had diabetes and ignored it, got eye changes and neuropathy to show for it... I've been on all the meds the doctor prescribed and tried to follow a food plan with lots of carbs. I've been on insulin and heavy duty diabetes meds with lots of side effects. AND... I've run out of money and had to figure out how to handle this disease without paying almost $500 a month for medications, syringes and test equipment. FOR ME [and I'm not trying to dictate to you] with the help of my friends here on HW, I've found that the 'nothing white but cauliflower and cottage cheese' food plan works the best at keeping my blood sugars under 150 more than 2 hours after a meal. I do not eat cereals, breads, pasta, noodles, rice, potatoes, pizza crust or sugar MOST OF THE TIME. I do eat lots of lean meats, some fatty meats, eggs, olive oil, olives, avocados, double or triple vegetables most nights with a dab of real butter, a bit of fruit [no juices], cheese and lots of green salads. I like to slide the topping off a piece of pizza and eat it over baby spinach greens. Most anything you can eat on a sub you can eat on a bed of greens. [I'm talking romaine, chard, turnip greens, peppers, cucumbers or most anything green along with lettuce.] This works for me. Your mileage may vary.

I like to eat soup and this is a great way to fill up without over consuming. Soup at the beginning of a meal will help you eat less. Ordering a sandwich without the bread along with a big salad will help your sugars. Substituting steamed veggies for fries or potatoes will help. I avoid foods that have the starch and meat mixed together, like spaghetti or lasagna. Once a month or so I go to a Chinese buffet and have lots of meats, some noodles and two kinds of soup. This keeps me from feeling deprived.

I've got to get to bed but I hope you will stick around and learn from reading the past posts here. Most of our members are helpful and like to share. Some [like me!] are a bit bossy because we know from experience what can come of ignoring this disease. It can seem overwhelming and scary but after a while you learn the lingo and see what others are doing and pretty soon you will be helping the next newbie who comes along. Take care and take it one meal at a time.
~ Jeannie, Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
I know God will not give me anything I can't handle. I just wish that He didn't trust me so much. ~Mother Teresa

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


Sydnee10
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2003
Total Posts : 561
   Posted 1/18/2009 9:06 AM (GMT -7)   

Teamanfl,

Hi,I'm Sydnee.Welcome to Healing Well.I don't post much lately as I have many things going on.Has your Doctor ordered a Hemoglobin A1C Test to get an idea what your mean Blood Glucose for a 3 Month period is?If not,he/she needs to.In October '08 mine was 8.2,which meant my Blood Sugar was averaging around 187 over a 3 Month period.My Doctor told me he prefers a 6.5,but will take a 7.When I had the A1C Test at my Blood Chemistry,my FBS was 129.

Lanie sent links via e-mail so I could receive free of cost Blood Glucose Meter's.I ordered a One Touch Ultra Mini and a Freestyle Lite.They only come with 10 Strips and Lancets,but your Insurance will/should cover the cost or at least part of the cost of Testing Supplies.First you will need a Diagnosis code and Prescription from your Doctor for your Pharmacy to fill.

August 12 when I started checking my Blood Sugar using the One Touch Ultra Mini Meter,I had a 224,214 and 200,but they weren't FBS.I instantly changed my Diet cutting out Carbs,Refined Sugar,Fruit,most Dairy,Starchy Vegetables and Refined Grains.I began walking,exercising and staying active/busy.My Blood Sugar is now in the 90s and low 100s and I've lost a considerable amount of weight.

My Diet consists of: Meat (primarily Fish),Non-starchy Vegetables,lots of Salads (dark Green Leafy Salad Greens),limited Fruit (a Granny Smith Green Tart Apple a Day + a few Berries),2-3 small dallops of Organic Plain Yogurt,which I sweeten with Stevia Herb and a few Berries Daily.Occasionally less than a serving of Whole unrefined Grains such as Organic Hulless Barley,Organic Quinoa,Organic Amaranth,Organic Millet,Nuts/Seeds,Nut/Seed Butters.I may eat 2 T of dried Beans/Legumes I cook and occasionally treat myself to Homemade Hummus made from Dried Organic Chickpeas,but only eat 1-2 T with Raw or steamed Vegetables..

I also try and eat an Avocado Daily as it is Healthy Fat.I use EVOO (Extra Virgin Olive Oil) and Certified Organic Virgin Coconut Oil for Cooking,drink lots of good pure Water,couple Cups of Decaffeinated Coffee,Caffeine-free Herbal Tea and Herbal Infusions.I also Supplement..

I don't drink Diet Sodas,drink/eat anything containing Aspartame or eat Sugar-free Foods..

You don't have to take another Pill IF you put effort into changing your lifestyle,which is lifelong.Diabetes CAN be controlled (if not reversed) through Diet and Exercise.

 

Best,

Sydnee

 


 

Post Edited (Sydnee10) : 1/18/2009 9:10:16 AM (GMT-7)


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 1/22/2009 2:06 PM (GMT -7)   
Selmer,
The main causes of cardiovascular disease is not just the consumption of saturated fats. If that were true the Inuit (Eskimo) peoples who lived on seal meat and whale blubber would have gone extinct 10,000 years ago. Also, the "low fat" food plans that the nutritionists and doctors have been shoving down our throats for the past 10 years would have wiped out heart attacks entirely.

Newer, more rational thinking allows us to eat real food and choose where to use our fats. The culprit in the HDL - LDL numbers appears to be the carbohydrates that accompany the foods at meal time. At one time nutritionists were just counting cholesterol in foods, like eggs, and ignoring the other parts of the food. Eggs contain lectithin and other things that balance out the cholesterol content, and pound for pound in this economy you can't buy cheaper protein than eggs! I use eggs, poultry and pork because they are less expensive and high quality protein. I find that the fats in these foods when accompanied by olive oil on my salad, lots of veggies, (with maybe a pat of butter on them!) I've been able to keep my numbers in an OK range.

Aside from all that, after caring for relatives in hospice and watching others go quickly with a heart attack, I'd choose the heart attack any day! tongue

Sydnee,
Not all diabetes responds to diet and exercise. We've had members here who were thin, active healthy adults who became Type2's out of the blue and needed insulin or byetta to keep their numbers in line. Each of us reacts differently to the disease.
~ Jeannie, Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
I know God will not give me anything I can't handle. I just wish that He didn't trust me so much. ~Mother Teresa

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


Marburg
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 486
   Posted 1/22/2009 3:12 PM (GMT -7)   
Forgive me if I missed it somewhere in these posts, but has anyone considered that teamanfl may not be truly diabetic. He said he was on meds for Emphysema. Many meds that treat Emphysema raise blood sugars into the diabetic range. The same can be said for asthma meds. I am asthmatic and when I use my asthma meds (some of which are the same as for Emphysema) my bs readings will be considerably higher. My Dad had Emphysema and his meds caused his diabetes. The treatment is basically the same but teamanfl should check with his doctor to see if his other meds may need to be tweaked also.

Marburg

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5404
   Posted 1/22/2009 3:34 PM (GMT -7)   
Excellent point, Marburg.  I'm not sure anyone suggested that to teamanfl.  We should always consider all the medications we take when we're looking for unaccountable high blood sugar - not to say we're looking for excuses, of course.  This is why this forum is so helpful. 
yeah
Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds


Sydnee10
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2003
Total Posts : 561
   Posted 1/22/2009 3:38 PM (GMT -7)   

Marburg,

Candidiasis,which I have also causes Diabetes,numbness and tingling sensations (Neuropathy) as well as many other Symptoms.

 


 

New Topic Locked Topic Printable Version
52 posts in this thread.
Viewing Page :
 1  2  3 
Forum Information
Currently it is Wednesday, December 07, 2016 1:14 PM (GMT -7)
There are a total of 2,734,210 posts in 301,193 threads.
View Active Threads


Who's Online
This forum has 151319 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, Geezer Jock.
414 Guest(s), 17 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details
Katie95, Geezer Jock, sheepguy, Chanymom, 81GyGuy, dismissed, Scaredy Cat, Laceymyaalayah, mpost, BillyBob@388, Paxton, biker90, U B Tough, jrpsf, FamilyGuy, kcsmith72, straydog


Follow HealingWell.com on Facebook  Follow HealingWell.com on Twitter  Follow HealingWell.com on Pinterest
Advertisement
Advertisement

©1996-2016 HealingWell.com LLC  All rights reserved.

Advertise | Privacy Policy & Disclaimer