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Prayerful
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 295
   Posted 2/24/2009 11:55 AM (GMT -7)   
For quite a long time I have been taking 1/2 cup of Kelloggs All Bran Extra Fiber, with following ingredients:
Calaories 5-;Total Fat 1; Sodium 120; Sugars 0; Total Carb 20;  DietaryFiber 13; Other carbs 7; Potassium 270; and Calcium 100.
I have been told this product has been or will be discontinued.
I noticed on GI "All Bran (tm)" was rated as 30, which I thought was quite good and that is why I decided to use it for breakfast, with some soy milk and stevia. Now I am not too sure I have been using the right "All Bran" because, as I said, there are quite a few boxes of "All Bran" in the supermarket.
I now see many Kelloggs All Bran products in the supermarket, but they all seem to have sugar and varying other numbers.
If they did discontinue this All Bran that I have been taking every morning, what could I use in it's place (cold cereal)?
Can anyone help please?
 
 
Pre-diab


 
73 yr old male
Some people get old too fast - and smart too late.


LanieG
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Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5392
   Posted 2/24/2009 12:35 PM (GMT -7)   
I don't know, Robert, because I don't eat cold cereal anymore.  You'll need to check the nutrition labels of many cereal boxes.  Kellogg's makes several different "bran" cereals including some with oat bran and extra fiber.  Post also makes a bran cereal as well as other brands including the generic supermarket brands.  I think you'll need to spend some time looking at labels!  And don't be suprised that sugar is in the ingredients.  It's probably in every cereal; but also look for high fructose corn syrup or honey.  Even if the cereal is not "sweetened", it may still have those sweeteners added.  All cereal will have an effect on your blood sugar and I hope you are testing 2 hours after breakfast because the cereal with any milk is a breakfast pretty high in carbs for a diabetic.  Good luck.

Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds


Prayerful
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 295
   Posted 2/24/2009 1:47 PM (GMT -7)   
What do you eat for breakfast now?
 
As I said, I have been using 1/2 cup of Kellogs All Bran - Extra Fiber. A few drops of Stevia and Westsoy unsweetened soymilk - 1g net cards; 1g sugar; total carb 5g; dietary fiber 4g.
Would the soymilk also be 'bad?'
 
Don't you lose (a lot of) weight with a no (low) carb diet?


 
73 yr old male
Some people get old too fast - and smart too late.


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5392
   Posted 2/24/2009 4:07 PM (GMT -7)   

For breakfast, I eat two eggs, or an EggBeater omelet, or scrambled EggBeaters with cheese, or something leftover from dinner the night before.  In the beginning, a person will lose weight quickly on a low-carb diet.  Right now I'm on a plateau.  I misread your first post.  The unsweetened soymilk is fine.


Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds


Prayerful
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 295
   Posted 2/25/2009 4:54 PM (GMT -7)   
Is there no cold cereal that I can have for breakfast (with unsweetened soy milk) and few drops of Stevia.
Are they all "off limits?"
I read several sites that said that ALL BRAN - Kelloggs had good GI and that is why I chose it. (Problem is Kellogss has several Bran cold cereals and the posts only mentioned ALL BRAN. I've been using the one with no sugar.)
I just wanted to know about something to eat for breakfast that would be quick to fix.
 
Also, are there any snacks (cookies, etc.) that can be eaten, in moderation with a cup of coffee?  Or, are they ALL "off limits?"
 
 
 
 
Just an aside - (I am not taking any meds and have not been told I have diabetes, but I consdier myself pre-diabetic and  always watch my carbs and sugar. Have cut out almost all carbs. Believe that is why I am a bit underweight for my height/age (73(. My A1C has always been about 5.5 (+/-). Just the fasting taken at doctor's office is a bit over the 100. But if I take it at home it is always below 100.)


 
73 yr old male
Some people get old too fast - and smart too late.

Post Edited (Robert2) : 2/25/2009 4:57:48 PM (GMT-7)


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5392
   Posted 2/25/2009 6:03 PM (GMT -7)   
Robert, since you monitor your own blood sugar at home, you will know which food works for you.  Still, you'll need to choose the cereal you buy carefully by reading the nutrition panel, choosing the one with the least carbs, highest fiber and hopefully no added sugar.  As I said, look at other brands besides Kellogg's as well as the store brands.  One half cup isn't a lot.  I'm just not familiar with cereal anymore, so I can't recommend a particular one.  Finding a treat to eat with your cup of coffee will send you on the same treasure hunt.  wink   Check out the carbs on the package.  Be careful of the so-called "sugar-free" products since they have flour and that will drive up the blood sugar.  Many "fat-free" products have more added sugar, too, so be careful of those.  Have you tried a few slices of apple with peanut butter?  That would be a good snack. 
Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds


Prayerful
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 295
   Posted 2/27/2009 8:57 AM (GMT -7)   
Thanks.
Just wondered if anyone had a cold or hot cereal in the morning that they could recommend...  (Low GI, etc.)
 
73 yr old male
Some people get old too fast - and smart too late.


Tony McGuire
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 483
   Posted 3/4/2009 2:26 PM (GMT -7)   
Robert: total your sugars' carbs, subtract the dietary fibers' carbs, and that is your 'net' carbs.

With your AIC, I'd say you could 'fudge' a little on breakfast if you find a cereal you really like. However, you should find out what your total daily carb intake should be. Perhaps your doctor can recommend a dietician? Your total carbs on a daily total should be worked out; then you'll have a better idea what your target should be and help with your quest for a cereal that will fit.

Myself, I have chunky peanut butter on wheat toast with a cup of coffee. That is nearly every breakfast for the last several months. Hot cereal, the Quaker 'Lower Sugar' Apples & Cinnamon has about 19 carbs with 3 dietary fiber carbs for a net of 16 carbs and MY allowance is 45 carbs each of the 3 meals. Once in a blue moon I splurge with fried potatoes and 2 eggs; just in case I'm ready to die, that breakfast will have taken me part way there.

(Edit: added 'hot cereal' portion)
Wife: Liz
Dogs: Koshka & Chomp
Brain Zaps: Gabitril
Kidneys: Simvastatin
Diabetes: Metformin, Insulin
Pain: Methadone, Morphine IR, Cymbalta, Lyrica

Post Edited (TonyMcGuire) : 3/4/2009 2:31:53 PM (GMT-7)


Phishbowl
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 547
   Posted 3/4/2009 5:17 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi Robert,
As Lanie mentions, you'll find that most of us who've "discovered" a healthy and accommodating way to eat low(er) carb, don't usually eat cereal as part of our regular meal plan. Cereal, almost by definition to a Diabetic, is refined grains. Whether it be rice, wheat, spelt, quinoa, rye, etc... it's a refined (think: highly processed) grain. Grains are one of the top 5 carbs that raise blood sugar in those who have difficulty metabolizing carbs. Sure some grains are better than others (less refined whole grains, omega 3's & 6's, etc.), and some can be had a part of a meal plan.... but for the most part, cereal is not the best breakfast choice. As Lanie mentions, read the labels and check out other manufacturer's ingredients lists so you can compare cereals.

For some, oatmeal seems to often be an exception to the grain connection. Many feel a bowl (1 Cup) of oatmeal (preferably steel-cut; less processed), offsets the carb content with its fibre and gelatinous, cholesterol-controlling properties.

Personally, the few times I have cereal & milk for breakfast (Cheerios), I'm always, inevitably hungry an hour later (a vicious high-carb cycle :-). A third a bagel with cream cheese & half an orange or an egg on toast with 2 slices of bacon will keep me going for hours. Protein is important for breakfast so, make sure you're getting enough of that. I've eaten even just a hunk of cheese while rushing out the door that's lasted me longer (in the energy department) than a whole bowl of cereal.

Sorry. Don't mean to knock the cereal thing. Just want you to know that there are better options for a balanced, healthy breakfast - whether you are a diabetic or not.

Most of us doing well with controlling our diabetes know that it's the processed, high-carb, high fructose corn syrup added "convenience" foods that we should all stay away from. Unfortunately, those are the most ubiquitous products constantly thrown in our face as "healthy". Eat the fruits & veggies naturally (and lots of veg!) - no juices. Watch your fat intake if you have to and choose a good mix of chicken, fish, pork, and beef, focussing more on the first three. Eat balanced meals with carbs, protein & fat and watch the portions of each as best suites YOUR lifestyle, (this is where no-carb, low-carb, etc. best suites the individual and their level of glucose control). Diabetic or not, watching the carb intake is important for optimal health. More and more it's looking like high-carb diets are playing a much larger role in causing problems, than ever suspected.
Cheers,
- Phishbowl (Type 1 since Jan'05 - Levemir, NovoRapid)
"What's Not Measured Is Not Managed"

"It is impossible for a man to learn what he thinks he already knows"-Epictetus


Prayerful
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 295
   Posted 3/5/2009 3:46 PM (GMT -7)   
Thanks all.
Tony McGuire you mentioned my A1C level. Did I read that right? How did you know my A1C level (don't think I mentioned it - just curious)?
 
I looked at several peanut butter jars and they seem to have much carbs, sodium, etc., and wonder why it is considered 'good' to have on bread? (Which brand/mfg.? Smooth, chunky, etc. is confusing.)
I've read in this post and elsewhere that taking taking bread is acceptable. I was in supermarket today and looked in the bread section and all the breads I looked at (if I am not mistaken) had high carbs; salt, etc. Is there a special brand/manufacturer/etc., that you guys buy?
I also looked at the 'egg beaters' and all of them (most anyway) said one portion would be 3 tablespoons. That is not much, is it? How can you 'fill-up' with 3 tablespoons?
Saw "organic free range chicken broth, low sodium." Read the back, which said: fat=0; cholesterol=0; sodium=70mg; carbs=1; and protein=2. Serving size=one cup. How does that sound for a drink for a cold day or sore throat, etc.?
 
Still trying to find something for breakfast, besides All Bran I think I mentioned that Kelloggs discontinued the 'no sugar' All Bran and brought out new edition, which now has sugar. When I contacted them they said the All Bran (without sugar) wasn't selling too well. So, I guess, they thought that in order to increase sales, they would increase the sugar content.
 
May I ask, if All Bran (etal) is not too good for diabetics and pre-diabetics, why is it rated as 30 GI, which is quite good, I thought? While Cheerios is rated GI 74.
 
Thanks for letting me ramble on.....
 
(Oh, BTW, someone once told me the 'formula' of a single (or daily meals) should be something like 25% fat; 25 carbs; and 50% protein. Or something like that. I forgot it.
Would someone know the correct equation? I don't even remember if it was in percentages or in these categories, etc. Something like 25gms carbs; 25gms (?) fat and 50gms of protein. I know that is not right.)


 
73 yr old male
Some people get old too fast - and smart too late.

Post Edited (Robert2) : 3/5/2009 5:25:11 PM (GMT-7)


Phishbowl
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 547
   Posted 3/5/2009 6:39 PM (GMT -7)   
If you're used to an All Bran, might I suggest Fibre1 cereal as one of the recommended, low-GI, high-fibre options. I personally don't eat it (cereal, in general) but I hear it's good for the reasons just mentioned. It's high-fibre content offsets the carbs making a 1Cup portion amount to about 5 grams of carbs.

Ahhhh....then comes the milk. A food really, more than a drink. A high-carb food at that so, if you like your cereal with lots of milk, measure it - it can amount to as much as 5 grams of carbs. I honestly don't know about soy milks and such so, just check the labels and measure how much you use (I always surprized myself when I did that - measured I mean :-)

Protein is a very important aspect of a balanced diet. So is fat for that matter. Protein & fat give you sustainable energy and carbs give you a more immediate rush of energy. When carbs are eaten along with fat/protein, the blood glucose spike that would normally happen if eaten alone, is mitigated (spike reduced and spread over a longer period). Peanut butter is mostly fat & protein with some carbs. The fat/protein in the peanut butter slows down the absorption of the carbs (i.e. toast), thereby breaking your fast, giving you energy, satiating your hunger, and sustaining that energy for a few hours. Peanut butters are mostly the same - commercial ones often add icing sugar for consistency purposes. For a real treat, try almond butter (awesomely good for fibre & omega oils) or some of the other nut butters. They're actually "nut" butters - peanuts are actually legumes (beans).

Some breads are better than others but for the most part , breads are refined grains. High-carb food anyway you slice it. Some of the organic breads are less refined but most of us find their prices so prohibitive that we resort to making our own (if we must have bread), or as most of us do: eliminate/significantly reduce them from our diet :-) There are some pretty good low-carb options widely available but, I can't personally recommend one.

Crack and egg and whip it up a bit with a fork - it's about 3T if you measured it (a large egg). Eggs are all protein with some fat. They go right along with meat, poultry, fish, & dairy. A breakfast high in protein, with a bit of fat (e.g. olive oil is a "good" fat), and some carbs is what most of us strive for.

The formula you are referring to is a calculation based on your current height & weight and how many calories a day you need to maintain/decrease/increase that level. Of those determined calories - the current recommendation from the food & nutrition folks, is that 50% of those calories should come from/be made up of carbs, 35-40% from protein, and 10-15% from fat. Those are guidelines and don't necessarily apply to most of us non-normal, diabetics here. There are good carbs and bad carbs and most of the good are found in natural products (veggies, fruits, beans, etc) and the bad usually come out of a box :-) about 30% of my diet is carbs (I love french fries) but portion control is key to balanced eating.

Ramble away! As you can tell, some of us like to ramble on, too :-)

Cheers,
Cheers,
- Phishbowl (Type 1 since Jan'05 - Levemir, NovoRapid)
"What's Not Measured Is Not Managed"

"It is impossible for a man to learn what he thinks he already knows"-Epictetus


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5392
   Posted 3/5/2009 7:45 PM (GMT -7)   
I use Kroger's brand of "egg beaters".  A little goes a long way but I don't measure it.  I'll saute some little pieces of fresh, raw vegetables very lightly and pour the egg substitute in with some grated cheese.  Takes just 5 minutes for breakfast.  Other times I'll use a whole egg.  As Kris says, not all bread is the same, so check to see which one has the highest fiber.  There are ways around this, too.  Maybe you could buy a high-fiber bread and eat one slice instead of two.  I buy Kroger's brand of natural peanut butter - no salt and no sugar added.  You have to look at the label (as always).  Robert, you ask about the GI of All Bran which you say is 30 and said you thought it was good.  Well, it's all relative as to what "good" is to whom.  Maybe to a "normal" person who doesn't have an issue with controlling blood sugar, cereal with a GI of 30 would be fine, but for a diabetic, that would cause a blood sugar spike especially if you consider the milk added.  The American Diabetes Assoc. still recommends that a meal contain 45gr (or more) of carbohydrate. That will not only allow the person to eat those carbs but also keep him/her on medication just to be able to eat like that.  I choose not to do that.  Seems a little backward to me, banging my head on the wall so I can take some aspirin.  eyes     
Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds


Prayerful
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 295
   Posted 3/6/2009 9:51 AM (GMT -7)   
Thanks for the helpful answers Phishbowl and LanieG
 
Phishbowl - I was not (am not) using 'milk' with the All Bran. I am using Westsoy unsweetened soymilk - 1g net cards; 1g sugar; total carb 5g; dietary fiber 4g.
 
I am off to the supermarket now to do a little reading of labels. I am sure that brands of peanut butter, etc., are different in all areas of the USA, and elsewhere. I hope I can find the Kroger's brand. Also, will look in the bread section again. I do think that many of the labels on these foods are misleading. Best for you; good for you; high in energy, etc. Guess we have to keep reading the contents.
 
(That's why I was a bit upset when Kelloggs took away the All Fiber, with no sugar, and put out a new brand, with sugan, saying it was 'healthier.' I just wondered how adding sugar to a product could make it healthier. Maybe it is just me and maybe I'm becoming too cynical with many manufacturers who, I believe, are more interested in making money than being 'truthful.')
 
73 yr old male
Some people get old too fast - and smart too late.


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5392
   Posted 3/6/2009 10:02 AM (GMT -7)   
Robert, I don't believe the manufacturers have our best health interests in mind either.  For them, it's the bottom line.  (Let's not get into corporate greed.....).  Anyway, sorry to say we do have to spend time reading labels.  And don't forget what they call a "serving".  The nutrition label may look great to us but then when we read the serving size we realize it's for a crumb.  Also, Kroger is a supermarket so I buy its store brand "Kroger" - but I'm sure there are other brands or generics of peanut butter.  I have to correct what I wrote about the Kroger brand above:  the ingredients are peanuts and salt.  But there is no added sugar.  Have fun shopping. :-)
Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds


Prayerful
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 295
   Posted 3/6/2009 3:16 PM (GMT -7)   
Yes, I know what you mean about the portion size. When you see sodium - 200, until you read that is per serving and then at the top you see that there are three servings in a small can.
Spent some time looking at the peanut butter and finally settled on the Smuckers  Natural. Serv size - 2 tbps; sodium - 0; carb - 6; fiber - 2; sugar - 1. The one thing that does concern me a bit (which I didn't notice before I bought it) is the total fat - 16; (2.5 sat fat)
 
Also, bought a loaf of Essential Flax Seed bread made with organic grains (? don't know what all of that is supposed to mean). I only intend to eat maybe one or two slices a day. Serving size - 2 slices. Total fat - 1 (no sat or trans fat); sodium - 120; carb - 15; fiber -3 and sugar - 2.
 
How are these two choices? Should I discontinue either or both? Would you have an opinion?
 
Bob
 
73 yr old male
Some people get old too fast - and smart too late.


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5392
   Posted 3/6/2009 3:36 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi Bob, seems like you're not going to be like people in your signature!  We're never too old to learn anything.  Actually, this journey has opened my eyes about food and nutrition and I'm all the wiser for it.  I'm trying to (gently) instill this in my kids, ages 24 and 27.  In any case, yes, I have an opinion. I think you found some products that are pretty decent.  Flax seed is touted as being heart-healthy and great for cholesterol.  I don't think those 2 slices a day are bad at all.  For me, I would have to eat only one slice at a time because I know how my blood sugar reacts.  And when you have protein and fat along with the bread slice, it helps keep the blood sugar from spiking (supposed to anyway).   Sounds like a piece of that bread with some peanut butter would be fine.  Everyone is different, so that's why we have to test whenever we try new food.  I hope they work for you.  Let us know, ok? 

Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds


Phishbowl
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 547
   Posted 3/7/2009 6:08 AM (GMT -7)   
Robert,

Here's a great nutrition site that you may want to check out for "comparison" (breads, cereals, etc.), shopping on-line:

http://www.nutritiondata.com/

It's quite an extensive database of food products, including many "brand Name" products. I had a lot of fun poking around and punching in a bunch of different parameters :-)

Cheers,
Kris
Cheers,
- Phishbowl (Type 1 since Jan'05 - Levemir, NovoRapid)
"What's Not Measured Is Not Managed"

"It is impossible for a man to learn what he thinks he already knows"-Epictetus


Tony McGuire
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 483
   Posted 3/8/2009 11:58 AM (GMT -7)   
Robert2: "Tony McGuire you mentioned my A1C level. Did I read that right? How did you know my A1C level (don't think I mentioned it - just curious)?"

Posted 2/25/2009 4:54 PM (GMT -7) "My A1C has always been about 5.5 (+/-)"

I just pay attention, Robert. :)
Wife: Liz
Dogs: Koshka & Chomp


maddyrules
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 12
   Posted 3/9/2009 12:19 PM (GMT -7)   

Have you tried any of the Glucerna cereals? Other cereals spike my bs but I've tried two Glucerna cereals which kept my bs in the normal range.

T


neicedenise
New Member


Date Joined Mar 2009
Total Posts : 1
   Posted 3/17/2009 11:45 AM (GMT -7)   
I eat cereal all the time for breakfast and my sugars are always great. I stick to anything low-fat, low-sugar (under 5 grams per serving) and whole grain. I usually eat AllBran Bran Flakes (regular), plain cheerios or Wheetabix, with skim milk or soy milk (unsweetened). I'm now completely medication free for over 3 years so I guess everyone is different. Just keep taking your sugars and eat what works for you. Everything in moderation is what I find.
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