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Risan1808
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2009
Total Posts : 153
   Posted 5/19/2009 10:55 AM (GMT -7)   
This is my first post in this forum.  My doctor suspects Type II and I have been monitoring my levels at home for the last 3 weeks.  I go back to my family doctor tomorrow.  My levels have been all over the place.  My morning readings are usually in the low 80's but during the day they go up quite a bit.  Usually into the 180's and 190's.  On a few occassions I have been just slightly over 200 (all 2-3 hours after a meal).  I am just curious what a normal range would be during a day.  Is going from a morning reading in the 80s clear up to the 180's-190's a normal range?  All these numbers have me so confused!!
 
Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Diagnosed Friday, February 13, 2009
Colazal 3 tabs 3X daily
Prednisone 40 mg since 3/4/09
Multivitamin
Zantac 1 tab 2X daily
Probiotic


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5392
   Posted 5/19/2009 11:26 AM (GMT -7)   
Welcome over to this side, Risan.  I'll bet that you'll get as many different answers to your questions about what a normal range is as the number of people you ask, including doctors.  This is because over the last fifty years the medical profession has sometimes argued within its groups about what "normal" is.  Generally speaking, most doctors today look for fasting to be under 100.  According to the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, a normal post-prandial blood sugar range would be a high of 140 at 1 hour, then 120 after 2 hours.  If you check old pamphlets from the American Diabetes Association, they may give you higher ranges.  I know someone who tells me that her doctor is "ok" with her blood sugar readings as long as they're under 200.  To me, that's ridiculous.  You might find the same thing when you ask others what 'normal' is if they're also monitoring their own blood sugar.  I think the medical professionals all agree, though, that extended blood sugar above 140 can damage internal organs such as the heart and kidneys.  Sometimes a 'normal person' might have spikes above that if he/she's eaten a meal with lots of carbs because carbs will drive the blood sugar up.  Your morning fasting numbers are wonderful, so it appears you still produce insulin for your body to use to metabolize the carbs but you're not metabolizing efficiently after meals which means you need to:  lose weight if you need to, get some regular exercise if you're not getting it, cut down on carbs, monitor your blood sugar (which you're doing).  The best thing you can do for yourself and your doctor is keep a daily log or journal with times, blood sugar readings, what you eat and whatever activity you do.  This way, you will see clearly how your diet/lifestyle affects your blood sugar.  The doctor will see if you can control your own blood sugar or if you cannot.
Example:
Tuesday, May 19, 2009
6:30 a.m.   92
7:00   breakfast:  2 eggs, 2 pieces of toast with butter, coffee with sugar and cream
9:00  160  (uh oh!  Must be the toast and sugar, so now you know to cut way back on that next time.) 
And so on through the day also noting snacks and any activity, walking, etc.
 
Hope this helps.  Stay with us and let us know what's going on, ok? yeah
Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds


Risan1808
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2009
Total Posts : 153
   Posted 5/19/2009 11:44 AM (GMT -7)   
Lanie,

That does help. I took a reading before lunch and it ws 96. 2 hours after lunch (small individual size thin crust pizza) it is now 176. Not sure if that is good or bad??

I am 5 foot 10 and weigh 155 so weight isn't an issue (although I have only been this weight for a year. I have lost 70 pounds in the last year).

It seems like whenever I get above about 140-145 I can really "feel" it.
Diagnosed Friday, February 13, 2009
Colazal 3 tabs 3X daily
Prednisone 40 mg since 3/4/09
Multivitamin
Zantac 1 tab 2X daily
Probiotic


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5392
   Posted 5/19/2009 11:48 AM (GMT -7)   

It's bad.

Thin crust or not, it appears you cannot metabolize carbs well.  You're borderline or prediabetic - terms some doctors still use and others don't like to use.  But it means that you'll probably be able to control the blood sugar and keep it within normal limits by changing what you eat.  Do you get any regular exercise?


Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds


Phishbowl
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 547
   Posted 5/19/2009 12:45 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi Risan - I see you're on prednisone. That drug is particularly known for causing elevated BGLs. That being said however, it does appear that your body does struggle to metabolize carbs (as shown by the readings before & after pizza). Pizza is not a good food choice for anyone needing to watch carbs.

Lanie's explanation of "normal" is right on. Being borderline does mean that some lifestyle changes may be all that's required to maintain BGLs and stay off medication. Many here have been successful by making even minor changes in diet and exercise. We all differ but most agree that learning about nutrition/carbs is the best place to start. Check past posts on diet - there's a lot of valuable info on what's worked for others.
Cheers,
- Phishbowl (Type 1 since Jan'05 - Levemir, NovoRapid)
"What's Not Measured Is Not Managed"

"It is impossible for a man to learn what he thinks he already knows"-Epictetus


Risan1808
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2009
Total Posts : 153
   Posted 5/19/2009 6:40 PM (GMT -7)   
Thanks everyone. I don't know if all this is caused by the prednisone or not. I was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis in February and have been on Prednisone since March. Some of my blood work prior to the diagnoses and prednisone showed a fasting level of 116. The lab said that was elevated. I have no clue.
Diagnosed Friday, February 13, 2009
Colazal 3 tabs 3X daily
Prednisone 40 mg since 3/4/09
Multivitamin
Zantac 1 tab 2X daily
Probiotic


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5392
   Posted 5/19/2009 7:08 PM (GMT -7)   
Hmm, if the fasting blood work showed 116 before you were on the prednisone, then you're right, the blood sugar was not elevated because of the prednisone.  It's great, though, that you're having normal results for morning fasts even while you're on that med.  Well, since you're testing your own blood sugar, you can try cutting way down on carbs and see how your readings are.  For example, try to halve what you'd normally eat.  If you would normally eat 2 pieces of bread, then eat only 1. See if just cutting back will change those post-prandial readings.  You seem to be able to control the blood sugar (because otherwise your morning fasts would be much higher).  Potatoes, corn, cereals, bread, pasta, anything made with flour and sugar will elevate blood sugar in everyone but elevate it too high in those who cannot metabolize carbs correctly (AKA diabetics).  The good news is that you are aware of this now and not years from now after prolonged high blood sugar.  The earlier it's "caught", the easier it is to control it with diet and exercise.  This is also my story.  smhair

Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds

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