Can I be feeling jittery because the blood sugar is getting to normal?

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loverain
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 210
   Posted 7/20/2009 3:11 PM (GMT -7)   
Hello,
 
I've been cutting carbs and monitoring my glucose levels since I was told by an ER doc that my levels were too high.  I'm happy to say that I've lost four pounds and my levels are lower than when I first started monitoring.  I had 123-129 FBG and I am now getting readings of 106-104 FBG.  My PP levels are getting lower also.  What I am puzzled about is that my tension and anxiety levels seem to be higher.  I had some stress and anxiety issues due to family member deaths...but was beginning to come to terms with the losses thus feeling less tense and stressed.  Now I've noticed that I am, for better lack of a term for it, feeling jittery.  I just feel nervous!  A friend told me that it would take some time for my body to adjust to new lower glucose levels.  I thought lower levels would help my stress and tension.  I'm sure I'm a healthier woman now that I'm eating better and excersizing more (although I could and will do better in the excersize department!)  Does anyone know if it's true that I'll feel jittery and nervous while I adjust?  I didn't even know my glucose levels were high until the doc told me.  I'm glad he did as diabetes runs in my family on both sides and hopefully, I can help myself now.  Thank you.  Joni
(I added a subject line.)

Post Edited By Moderator (LanieG) : 7/20/2009 3:32:51 PM (GMT-6)


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 3901
   Posted 7/20/2009 3:31 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi Joni, I'm glad you're getting lower blood sugar readings!  That's great!  It's true that some people may feel jittery, even sweaty and disoriented when their blood sugar is brought down to normal from very high blood sugar but I don't know if that's what you're feeling.  It's possible though and if that's the reason then with a little time, you will feel better as your body gets used to 'normal' again - your friend is right!  Ease into the exercise gradually, too, especially if you're not feeling right.  One idea is to keep a log or kind of diary with your daily readings (time, what you eat) and when you exercise.  In this way, you'll have a record of all those minutes of exercise that turn into hours or miles and you'll be encouraged to keep it up.  Good luck.  Sorry you've been through some tough family times.  Stress also makes blood sugar run high.  Take care and stick to it - you're your best friend. :-)
Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds
                                                                 


TVEditor
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2008
Total Posts : 481
   Posted 7/21/2009 6:45 AM (GMT -7)   
Hiya Joni,
 
Yes, I know what you mean about the jitters and nervousness.  There are times when I feel not quite right and when I do the ole finger poke routine, the reading comes in at normal or slightly below.  My doc says this is OK.  He must be right since these occasions have been less frequent over the past year since my diagnosis.
 
( A year has passed already ?!?  As the song goes... another day older and  deeper in debt scool )
 
Caffeine never used to bother me but since I've changed my diet, even a single cup of coffee at the wrong time of the day can give me the jitters.  I find that a little snack (ie. a handful of nuts) calms me down.
 
Lanie's right about easing into the exercising -- I don't have a structured routine and a few weeks ago. I walked a round of golf.  That's about 4 miles!  I thought I broke my skeleton ... EVERYTHING hurt!  Afterwards, my BG reading was way out of whack.  I've since learned that I need to eat something before starting out and about halfway through the round to keep me normal.  This works for me but you'll have to do your own logging, and testing to find out what works for you.
 
Anyway, stick with it ... things get better :-)
Chris - Forum Moderator, Diabetes

~ Diagnosed Type 2 in July/'08
~ Dropped 40 or so pounds after following HealingWell advice
~ Diabetes under control / no meds - so far - knock on head
~ My doctor thinks HE is responsible (Don't tell him! He's happy ;)

I used to eat 100% wrong -- now I eat 95% right


uniquelyme
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 1037
   Posted 7/23/2009 5:30 PM (GMT -7)   
 
 
Wow!! This is exactly how I feel when my blood sugar levels drop even a little bit.  I am so used to having very high levels that when it goes down to even 160-190 I feel bad...shaky, sweaty, sick...
 
Is that normal?  Will I ever be able to have good levels?
 
Me.

 I hate Boats!!!!
 
Post Lamenectomy Syndrome, Spinal Stenosis, DDD....
1999 Hemi Lamenectomy/2005 Spinal Fusion(L4-S1)
Methadone 120 mg. a day/15 mg. Oxycodone as needed(up to 4 x a day)
High Blood Pressure: Lisinopril HCTZ 10 mg. daily
Type 2 Diabetes: (March 16, 2009)
Metformin HCL ER 1000 mg. at night..Glipizide 10mg. 2X in the morning
Lantus 35 units at bedtime with Solostar Pen                                                                   

 


couchtater
Elite Member


Date Joined Jul 2009
Total Posts : 12534
   Posted 7/23/2009 7:10 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi, I'm new here. I'm pre-diabetic. I get dizzy and start seeing shadows on the edges of my vision when my sugar drops to 100. My fasting at the doctor's was 126. One morning at my home I got as high as 179, but that was when I ate a small piece of chocolate cake with three scoops of ice cream the night before in a moment of weakness. I spanked myself for that no-no. I'm trying to be very good. Whole wheat bread, veggies (yeck), and no sugar (wwwwhhhhaaaaa)!
It's baby steps for me on my road to change. Next step is to get moving more.

Joy

loverain
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 210
   Posted 7/24/2009 7:03 PM (GMT -7)   
Thanks y'all for responding to my message. It makes me feel better to know there are others out there who are feeling the way I do. I will not give up! I am lucky that I really love vegetabes. I just wish I could still eat my mashed potatoes and cream gravy...hot bisquits and corn bread! I also love mexican food...I'm still eating it without the beans and tortillas. I know I'll adjust to my new way of eating I would rather be healthy as I can be...it's worth the sacrifice. I also would like to know if anyone has shortness of breath. Sometimes I feel I can't get a satisfying breath. I don't think I'm hyperventilating...I'm not breathing shallow or fast. Just feel like I can't take in a good breath sometimes.

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 3901
   Posted 7/24/2009 8:38 PM (GMT -7)   
I don't think the shortness of breath would be related to your blood sugar.  From what you wrote before, it wasn't critically high to begin with but I'm not a doctor, so if this is an on-going condition, you'd better call your doctor's office.  That is priority, so let the doctor see what's going on.  A good substitute for mashed potatoes is mashed cauliflower.  It's made the same way: just simmer the cauliflower until it's soft, drain it, and mash it with butter.  Yes, butter is fine.  You can make a gravy substitute with either soy flour and/or almond flour (meal) with butter and a little Kitchen Bouquet for color.  I found that too much soy flour tastes too much like soy (duh), so I only use about a spoon of it and then I use almond flour for the rest of the bulk.  Real heavy whipping cream makes this and mashed cauliflower nice and creamy.  Almond flour is usually in the organic section of the supermarket along with soy products, etc.  I mostly shop at Kroger and they always have it.  Also, if you want to "bread" chicken or fish, you can use the almond flour alone or in combination with grated parmesan cheese (in the green shaker container).  I dip the pieces in beaten egg and then in the almond/parmesan and then saute or bake them.  You can mix dried oregano and basil with the almond flour to spice it up.  Search back through some old posts we have lots of recipes.  I'll see if I can find a couple and bump them up. 

Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds
                                                                 


couchtater
Elite Member


Date Joined Jul 2009
Total Posts : 12534
   Posted 7/25/2009 10:59 AM (GMT -7)   
I do like caulflower.... but I have to avoid soy produces (they make my fibroid grow). I love almonds, does it make things taste nutty?

Joy

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 3901
   Posted 7/25/2009 11:16 AM (GMT -7)   
Almond flour/meal does not taste like almonds to me.  I don't know why it doesn't since it's pure almonds ground fine.  The one from the supermarket is very fine. I've ground almonds at home but they come out course and that's also good for breading but they still don't taste particularly almondy - at least no one who's eaten it in my house has said it did.  Almonds and walnuts have good oils and they're healthy, so they're a good choice as a snack or as part of your meal if you eat them ground.
Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by low/no carb diet and exercise; no meds
                                                                 

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