Hypoglycemia as a precursor to prediabtes?

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
[ << Previous Thread | Next Thread >> ]

elcamino
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2005
Total Posts : 1744
   Posted 2/18/2010 5:56 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi all,
 
I believe I'm hypoglycemic ( and have been for quite a while--at least 3 years).  The episodes have gotten a lot more frequent this past year.  I've been reading that hypoglycemia can be a precursor to prediabetes--is this accurate?  Does the research support this?  My father and my grandmother both had Type II diabetes, so I have a family history.  I also have autoimmune disease already which may make me suspectible to other autoimmune issues. 
 
If it's true, is there anything i can do to prevent the diabetes from developing?
 
thanks!
 
El
Current dx: Rheumatoid Arthritis
Suspected dx: UCTD/Lupus
Current Meds: Enbrel, Methotrexate, nexium, tramadol, nasonex, Nifedipine, Folic Acid, Tylenol PM


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5408
   Posted 2/18/2010 7:32 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi El and welcome to the diabetes forum.  I have read the hypoglycemia may be a precursor to diabetes later on but I don't know if it's true in every case.  Having type 2 in the family does put you at risk though.  The good news at this point is that you are aware of it.  Do you test your blood sugar?  Is this how you know you do have bouts of low blood sugar?  Do you eat regularly and have breakfast?  I'm not sure if it's possible to prevent diabetes but it may be possible to control it, especially if you catch your blood sugar rising early enough.  When and if you do see that your blood sugar is rising above normal limits, cut out some carbs and test to see how the blood sugar is.  Basically, it's the carbs that cause the rise.  If you're able to do some regular, sustained exercise, this also helps with blood sugar, as well as other health matters.
Lanie
 
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by exercise and a low/no carb diet


elcamino
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2005
Total Posts : 1744
   Posted 2/18/2010 9:10 AM (GMT -7)   

Hi Lanie,

Thanks for your response.  For clarification, I do not yet know if I'm truly hypoglycemic.  I have episodes of intense trembling, nausea, light headedness, heart palpitations, etc... that are immediately relieved by the ingestion of sugar.  I have not tested my blood sugar--didn't know if that was an option without a diabetic diagnosis, but my rheumatologist sometimes measures my blood glucose level as a matter of course.  Out of four measurements, one was low--55, one was slightly  high--112, and two were within the normal limits.  I don't know if these are truly meaningful numbers, as they were only single, random measurements.  I have not had a glucose tolerance test done.  I'm more concerned about the symptoms than the lab measures; the symptoms are scary and make me feel awful.


Current dx: Rheumatoid Arthritis
Suspected dx: UCTD/Lupus
Current Meds: Enbrel, Methotrexate, nexium, tramadol, nasonex, Nifedipine, Folic Acid, Tylenol PM


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5408
   Posted 2/18/2010 1:25 PM (GMT -7)   
I'd be more concerned about those symptoms, for sure, and I would pursue that with my doctor to find out what's going on.  If it's really hypoglycemia, you might carry some candy with you at all times.  If you're not eating breakfast, than I'd suggest you do, but make sure you see your doctor about those symptoms. 
Lanie
 
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by exercise and a low/no carb diet


AK Rockley
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2010
Total Posts : 1
   Posted 2/18/2010 7:15 PM (GMT -7)   
Hypoglycemia does not necessarily lead to diabetes, but it can if not managed. There are three generations of hypoglycemics in my family and only 1 diabetic. It is a good idea to see a doctor, but they often don't recognize hypoglycemia as being a legitimate problem or can't easily test for it.

While you should carry something sweet with you when your sugars drop it is more important to eat properly. I suggest carrying dried apricots rather than sugar because they provide sugar buffered by fiber. Try eating 1/2, not a whole one and really chew it until it practically dissolves. You absorb carbohydrates (sugar) through the mouth. However, simply eating better and more often may eliminate or certainly reduce your problems.

Make sure you get a good breakfast, whole rolled oats with nuts and seeds provides a slow release carbohydrate and protein. Eat snacks every 2-3 hours. Good snacks are vegetables and hummus, nuts, cheese and whole grain crackers. Make sure you get vegetables at every meal. You might try eliminating grains for a while as many hypoglycemics have a hard time with grains. Get good quality protein (fish, poultry, lean beef, pork, tofu). Good vegetables are broccoli, cauliflower, greens (kale, chard, mustard), fennel, beans, carrots, mushrooms. Root vegetables like squash may cause problems.

Add good fats to your diet. Fats help to slow down the absorption of carbohydrates, and it is the carbohydrates that spike the blood sugar. But good carbohydrates are essential to give you slow release glucose. Try nuts, homemade salad dressing with olive oil and a vinegar on salads, marinated artichoke hearts, olives, avocado.

Hope this helps.

AK

Dagger
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 1522
   Posted 2/18/2010 7:45 PM (GMT -7)   
I've been hypoglycemic for over 20 years but I'm not diabetic. I control it with diet and exercise.

AK's advice is great. I agree that you should try to avoid lows by controlling your diet. I carry walnuts for when a meal is delayed. I never go more than three hours without food from when I get up to when I go to bed.

elcamino
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2005
Total Posts : 1744
   Posted 2/19/2010 6:24 AM (GMT -7)   
Thanks for the advice everyone.  I think I will start carrying more snacks, especially nuts.  Interestingly enough, I'm also gluten sensitive, so I've eliminated breads and pastas and such already, but now I tend to eat more fruit and rice and potatoes, all of which have a fairly high GI value.  I'm going to talk to my rheumatologist about the hypoglycemia thing next week.  Whether he'll dismiss it or not is anyone's guess, but I'll go see my primary eventually.

Current dx: Rheumatoid Arthritis
Suspected dx: UCTD/Lupus
Current Meds: Enbrel, Methotrexate, nexium, tramadol, nasonex, Nifedipine, Folic Acid, Tylenol PM


Dagger
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 1522
   Posted 2/19/2010 2:50 PM (GMT -7)   
Eat like you have it and if you feel better, then you probably are hypoglycemic.

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5408
   Posted 2/19/2010 3:20 PM (GMT -7)   
El Camino, good luck with balancing what you can eat with the health conditions.  I know it's tricky but eventually you'll figure it out.
Lanie
 
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by exercise and a low/no carb diet


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 2/25/2010 11:39 AM (GMT -7)   
El Camino,
Also, get yourself an inexpensive blood glucose monitor. Look for one with inexpensive test strips because that is where most of the cost of monitoring your sugar shows up. Testing yourself when you are low feeling, testing after a meal with rice or sugar, testing two hours after a meal, all of these things will give you information that you can take to your doctor.

This will also serve you well should you flip and become diabetic. You already will have learned which foods affect you the strongest. Take care.
~ Jeannie


elcamino
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2005
Total Posts : 1744
   Posted 3/3/2010 6:45 AM (GMT -7)   
Thanks everyone for your comments and advice.  I did talk to my rheumatologist about it, and he agreed that what I described sounded like hypoglycemia, and combined with the fact that I've gained about 20 pounds in the past year and have a family history of Type II diabetes, I may very well be in the early stages of developing it.  He advised me to switch to a low glycemic diet.
 
Perhaps I will go out and purchase an inexpensive blood glucose monitor--can't hurt, can it?
 
Thanks!
 
El
Current dx: Rheumatoid Arthritis
Suspected dx: UCTD/Lupus
Current Meds: Enbrel, Methotrexate, nexium, tramadol, nasonex, Nifedipine, Folic Acid, Tylenol PM


Marburg
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 486
   Posted 3/3/2010 12:03 PM (GMT -7)   
El, make sure you have a high enough protein to carb balance. This will help level out the readings. Try to eat something every 3-4 hours.

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5408
   Posted 3/3/2010 3:35 PM (GMT -7)   
El, yes, having a blood glucose meter would be helpful in your case so you know what levels your blood sugar is.  Maybe your doctor can write a prescription for one and your insurance can cover it and the test strips that you'll need.  Or, you can buy an inexpensive one (for example, from WalMart) but you'll need to continue buying the test strips.  In any case, it would give you an idea how your blood sugar is running.
Lanie
 
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by exercise and a low/no carb diet

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
Forum Information
Currently it is Thursday, December 08, 2016 7:05 PM (GMT -7)
There are a total of 2,735,097 posts in 301,275 threads.
View Active Threads


Who's Online
This forum has 151370 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, calvin1242.
414 Guest(s), 10 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details
Tnmproject, JJ2511, 0311, Fl Drifter, getting by, LG13, DennisinNY, platinumpixie, bdavis, julymorning


Follow HealingWell.com on Facebook  Follow HealingWell.com on Twitter  Follow HealingWell.com on Pinterest
Advertisement
Advertisement

©1996-2016 HealingWell.com LLC  All rights reserved.

Advertise | Privacy Policy & Disclaimer