Inflammatory Bowel Disease & Diabetes

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Zurich
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2007
Total Posts : 49
   Posted 4/7/2010 7:29 AM (GMT -7)   
I have both of above (I know IBD is pretty rare).  But, I was wondering if anyone else does have both how they manage their diet.  I can't eat a lot of high fiber foods (salads) which are low in carbs due to the IBD.  It seems as if my IBD prefers carbs and my diabetes is a low carber.  Also, weight loss.  Having IBD I am very skinny, I can't afford to lose weight.  Eating low carbs and exercising to keep the blood sugars down makes me loose weight.   Maybe I need meds for the diabetes, maybe diet and exercise is too much on my body?  Speaking of meds, I've heard that a lot of them cause diaherra - that would not go with my IBD.  I am really ready to cash it in here, every day is a struggle to maintain the blood sugars and the IBD at the same time.  How the Type 2 happened to me I will never know.  No one in my family has ever had it.  I am far from overweight.  My first signal was when I was pregnant I had gestational diabetes that they could only get under control with insulin.   After pregnancy I used diet and exercise to keep it in track with no meds.  I am now 48 though and maybe my body is just changing and I can't control it anymore with diet and exercise.   My husband only drinks Pepsi ThrowBack which contains the original sugar that they use to make it with back in the 50's.  He is very overweight, especially in the stomach and is a complete high carb addict.  Last night he woke up at 2 a.m. and was in the kitchen drinking his Pepsi Throwback and eating leftover pizza before going back to bed.  This morning before I left for work at 6 a.m. I checked his blood sugar - it was 95.  How do some body's do that?   JUDY2 HELP!
 
Zurich 

jujub
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 10391
   Posted 4/7/2010 7:45 AM (GMT -7)   
Zurich, he can do that because he isn't diabetic - yet. I managed my diabetes for almost ten years with diet and exercise; when my UC was flaring I wasn't eating enough of anything and everything was passing through too fast for my glucose to go up.

I'm lucky because my UC isn't terribly food-sensitive. I limit my fats and fiber, but do tolerate artificial sweeteners. I've drunk nothing but diet drinks or unsweetened drinks for years. I'm also lucky enough to be in remission for the past 4 years, which helps.

As far as fruits and veggies, cook them very well and your body will tolerate them better. Not for us the salad for lunch every day, but I can wrap a leaf of romaine around some grilled chicken. Canned fruits work well for me, and I can eat fresh peaches and pears (peeled) even when flaring. Stick to complex carbs when you can.

Get yourself some extra test strips and check your levels periodically through the day - including a couple of hours after each meal you eat. This will help you determine what causes you problems. Like IBD, we're all different. For instance, pasta with a low-fat red sauce always takes my blood sugar lower. My husband sees the same thing, but many diabetics can't eat pasta.

It's really a balancing act. Also, the fact that you developed this despite being thin may mean that you have a third type of diabetes, which is more like type I but has an adult onset. If this is the case, you will likely need medication.

And as far as medication side effects, I take Metformin, which has digestive issues as a side effect for some. I've had no problem with it as long as I take it with food.

Good luck, and keep reading here. The experts here can be a big help to you!

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5392
   Posted 4/7/2010 9:29 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi Zurich, I'm sure it's a hard balancing act as Judy says.  I can only give you dietary help for diabetes but Judy knows more about the IBD you have.  In general you understand that it's the carbs that will cause the blood sugar to rise.  Cooked or raw, vegetables have small amounts of carbs and you can eat the ones that don't cause flares.  Potatoes, carrots and winter squash have many more carbs than other vegetables and I don't eat them.  Corn is a grain and it will cause high blood sugar, so stay away from that one,too.  There are lab tests the doctor can order to determine if you might be turning into type 1.5 or LADA, which may mean using insulin if other meds can't control the blood sugar.  Sorry I can't help more.
Lanie
 
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by exercise and a low/no carb diet


jujub
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 10391
   Posted 4/7/2010 10:11 AM (GMT -7)   
Thanks, Lanie. I'm not too familiar with type 1.5, guess I'm getting old because it wasn't known when I went to school!

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5392
   Posted 4/7/2010 11:02 AM (GMT -7)   
Nah! I don't think age has anything to do with it! I think the medical profession has recognized this condition and finally put a name to it where before there was no name. When the body begins to produce an antibody (GADA) to the pancreatic beta cell protein, there's less and less insulin produced, and the person quickly becomes a severe diabetic and then type 1. This often happens after the age of 35. I don't know if this is happening more and more now or if it's just being labeled correctly.


This link explains the test for GADA better: Diabetes-related]

jujub
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 10391
   Posted 4/7/2010 1:11 PM (GMT -7)   
Well, thank goodness my immune system hasn't decided to target my pancreas (yet, at least.)

Back when I was in school, they didn't know why some people with "adult onset" diabetes had to have insulin right away, or why they didn't fit the normal profile. They just treated them the same as those with "juvenile" diabetes.

But then, when I went to school, there were still dinosaurs in them thar hills....

Zurich
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2007
Total Posts : 49
   Posted 4/8/2010 5:46 AM (GMT -7)   

Thanks everyone for responding.  I am going to doctor next Friday and he is going to do an A1C so we will take it from there.  Do you ever just get so bummed out at times and think your body is a freak of nature?  Everything and anything that can go wrong with it will.  Trying to keep my sanity and take things one day at a time. 

Thanks,

Zurich


jujub
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 10391
   Posted 4/8/2010 1:44 PM (GMT -7)   
Zurich, I just think my life is an ongoing medical adventure. I sit back and watch to see what my immune system will attack next.

wodin
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2009
Total Posts : 523
   Posted 4/9/2010 11:58 AM (GMT -7)   
I have UC, and have been pre-diabetic for years. During my last serious UC flare, I was treated with 60 mg/day of Prednisone, and left unsupervised by my GI because he went on vacation for a month, then forgot about me when he got back (I fired him, and got another GI).
Anyway, the Prednisone tipped my pre-diabetes over to type 2, and doesn’t seem to be resolving as usually happens with Prednisone induced diabetes.

Like Judy, I am also treating my diabetes with MetFormin, and seem to tolerate it well after adjusting to it. I am, however also taking an iron supplement for anemia. Iron supplements can cause constipation, so it seems that the MetFormin and the iron are balancing each other.

jujub
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 10391
   Posted 4/9/2010 1:24 PM (GMT -7)   
Wodin, I also had elevated BGL for the first time while on oral steroids. Just one of the many unpleasant long-term side effects.

PoolTableGuy
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2010
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 4/12/2010 9:21 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi Gang. I'm new to this and all forums but have decided to participate. Hopefully, I can find info to help me and offer info to help others. Brief health history: 2005 dianosed with type II diabetes. Initially treated with oral meds but started taking insulin in 2008. Oct 2007, had a heart attack caused from smoking. Had a stent put in and have had no heart problems since. (Quit smoking that day.)  January 2008 diagnosed with Crohn's disease. Treated unsuccessfully with various medications for approximately a year. After another doctor did another colonoscopy, re-diagnosed as UC. As bad as it was, I am told UC is 100 times better than Crohn's. Unable to get UC under control and kept feeling worse and worse (including up to 25 bathroom visits per day) until Aug 2009 when colon was removed and J-Pouch constructed. Initially that went well, but developed serious infection that I just about died from. Three operations within 2 weeks and in hospital for 24 days. Had ileostomy reversed on March 1, 2010. Supposed to be in hospital 3 - 5 days but as luck would have it, I stayed for 12. It seems my bowels took a long time to begin working. So, here it is a month later and I am joining this forum to learm from other people how to manage my new "self". Still in the bathroom every couple of hours. And as you can imagine, I am trying to learn a new diet that will help my rear not be so irritated (that is an understatement) and not be too high in carbs. Maintaining weight okay... take a daily vitamin... drink lots of water.
 
Diabetically speaking, I am very successful at managing my glucose by counting carbs at each meal and adjusting insulin (humalog) accordingly. I use 1 unit of insulin for each 5 carbs. I check my glucose at every meal and have a target goal of 100. For every 20 points above 100, I add 1 unit of insulin as a correction dose. These numbers were formulated with the guidance of the nurse practitioner I see every three months and my daily logs of carbs for each meal and snack and the amount of humalog taken. I also take 30 units of lantus before bed each night.
 
 Struggling with my new plumbing (J-Pouch). Need to come up with a plan for testing new foods so I can get some relief from the bathroom. It seems eggs, toast with cheese, orange juice mixed with light cranberry juice is working for morning meal. I can sometimes get three hours between bathroom visits. Lunch has been turkey sandwich with light mayo, potatoe chips and usually shortbread cookies. This kind of meal offers a little shorter interval between bathroom visits but is tolerable. Dinner has been producing the worst results unless I eat turkey or chicken, canned french cut string beans and mac & cheese. I think the key might be that I'm eating too much at dinner. Did I mention that I love to eat?
 
I know it has only been 6 weeks. Should I be more patient?
 

jujub
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 10391
   Posted 4/13/2010 5:34 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi, and welcome to HealingWell. I don't believe any of us here has a pouch. You will find a few people at the HealingWell Ostomy and Ulcerative Colitis boards, but the best resource we have found is this one:

http://www.j-pouch.org/


They have information and a lively discussion board for pouchers.


Lanie, Jeannie, Chris, I hope it's okay for me to post this link here. We refer people to this site a lot from the UC forum.

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5392
   Posted 4/13/2010 8:51 AM (GMT -7)   
Thank you for posting this, Judy.  I do not know the best diet for IBD, so I'm no help there.  For the diabetes, it's well-known that eating food with the lowest glycemic index (or low carb) helps control blood sugar the best.  Prednisone will cause high blood sugar during the time that it's taken and normally the blood sugar will go down after you've been off it but this varies with the person. 
Lanie
 
forum moderator - diabetes
diabetes controlled so far by exercise and a low/no carb diet


Former58D
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2009
Total Posts : 173
   Posted 4/19/2010 7:16 PM (GMT -7)   
I control my Crohn's very well with the Paleo diet. I have tried everything for it, from the 5-ASAs to Remicade and prednisone. Unresponsive. I have completely switched to paleo - I do not eat grains, dairy, or legumes. Stunning turn around. I can see no reason whatsoever to consume sugar or grains at this point. My officemate's daughter has diabetes (among other things) and her blood sugar is so much better after going for more of a paleo approach. My carbs are predominantly green/leafy veggies with moderate fruits and nuts. That's it. It does not have to be a low carb diet, but you must choose your carb intake from quality sources (indeed all macronutrients). It's not easy at first given the convenience of modern processed foods, but when you're sick and tired of being sick and tired the decision is easier.
"What can't be changed must be endured" - unknown

DX with distal Crohn's colitis Oct 2007, predominantly in rectum
Colozal and Canasa for 2+ years - developed an intolerance
6MP - elevated LFTs after 100mg, no effect after 9 months
Currently: Remicade (Nov '09), and Paleo Diet. Not quite remission, but so much better!

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