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Marburg
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Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 486
   Posted 8/24/2010 12:08 PM (GMT -7)   
I'm not seeing any new posts or responses for days now.
eyes  

Chaul22
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2010
Total Posts : 200
   Posted 8/24/2010 12:26 PM (GMT -7)   
Not much going on right now I suppose.. I did spot research results yesterday on findings that vitamin D deficiency has been genetically linked to many conditions including type 1 diabetes and lupus. That might be something to discuss about..
 
(I fixed this so you can click on it.  Lanie)

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5408
   Posted 8/24/2010 5:59 PM (GMT -7)   
I'm here, just sort of busy getting things done.  Yes, it's been quiet here.  I think the heat has put me through the wringer, although today it didn't get to 90.  Wow.  This has been the most torrid summer here!  Chaul, thanks for the article.  I've also read that much of the population today has a vitamin D deficiency to some extent.  I suppose this is not surprising since skin cancer has jumped so high in recent years and people are staying away from the sun, and they're also using sunscreen, I wonder if that blocks the D from the sun.  I started taking vitamin D as a supplement in the spring.
Lanie

diabetes moderator
diabetes type 2 controlled so far by diet and exercise
very low carb way of eating

Chaul22
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2010
Total Posts : 200
   Posted 8/24/2010 11:47 PM (GMT -7)   
Vitamin D is just something that gets produced by the body with the help of UV light from the sun. It's kinda double-edged. Sunscreens with a high enough (8+?) sun protection factor will block the UV rays that start vitamin D synthesis, but on the other hand you need some sun protection in order to not burn yourself. Diet is good. I've also been taking supplements for about a year after I figured I'm not getting any sun at this latitude.

I can't find anything online that would state how much sun is enough and how much is too much.. Something like 15 minutes a day with sunblock? What about latitude? It's only possible to get burned here during those 1-2 months of the year it seems. That's how little sunlight we get, and the country has proportionally the highest number of diabetics in the world, or it's right up there in top 3.

It's curious how in recent years the emphasis seems to have been on getting people out of sunlight and use sunblock with highest possible protection factors.

I thought this forum would automatically parse through links.. sorry about missing the link.

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5408
   Posted 8/25/2010 7:31 AM (GMT -7)   
Good question about how much sunlight is enough.  A lot of news about harmful sun exposure have scared us.  I suppose people who live in the very northern latitudes would have to take supplements?  Here in the States, vitamin D is always added to milk but I don't drink milk now and I don't eat cereal or bread products which are highly fortified with vitamins and minerals, so even though I do work a lot outside in our yard and garden, I am taking vitamin D pills. 
 
I think you said you're in Norway?  And you are saying that the country has a very high proportion of diabetics?  You mean type 2?  This really surprises me.  I wonder why?
 
Lanie

diabetes moderator
diabetes type 2 controlled so far by diet and exercise
very low carb way of eating

Chaul22
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2010
Total Posts : 200
   Posted 8/25/2010 11:41 AM (GMT -7)   
No, I'm from Finland. I was talking about type 1. There is very little sunlight this far north, and it's also very cloudy. Then we still have the nightless night, and on winters the sun never really comes up for a month or two. Actually that only happens 1000km north from where I am and even then the sun stays really low all year round.

Vitamin D is added to milk here too. They actually increased the amount few years ago. Fish is also rich in vitamin D but kids or adults these days don't eat too much fish..

Statistics: www.diabetesatlas.org/map
If you go here, pick new cases of type 1 in children in 2010, you'll see that Finland is right there on top with a "score" of 57.4 cases per 100 000. A figure of 24 is already considered very high. So for some reason, most cases are concentrated here in northern europe. But if you look at type 2, or total figures, Finland is not quite that near the top... Go figure.

Now I seem to have stolen yet another thread..

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5408
   Posted 8/25/2010 2:48 PM (GMT -7)   
No, you didn't hijack the post.  Marburg was only wondering where everyone was.  I'm sure there have been studies about the large number of type 1s in Finland and the rest of Northern Europe, but the key would be 'why'?  I would presume that Finland is mostly homogeneous compared to the US, so how could there be such a dramatic change like that?  Something in the environment?  Or has lifestyle changed so much?  But that would mean that type 1 diabetes can actually be created by these changes.  If that's the case, then it can be prevented.  Hmm, something to think about.
confused  
Lanie

diabetes moderator
diabetes type 2 controlled so far by diet and exercise
very low carb way of eating

Chaul22
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2010
Total Posts : 200
   Posted 8/25/2010 11:37 PM (GMT -7)   
It's even more interesting how the numbers have been going up recently (incidence rate). That would suggest that either there has been a change in the environment or the cases are detected sooner. The latter does not make much sense to me because they are bound to be diagnosed eventually if healthcare exists in the country.

Few years ago, I read an article that seemed to claim that possibly diabetes (type 1?) was a condition developed by the body to protect itself against the cold. So, the higher the blood glucose the better chance you would have of surviving in freezing temperatures. That can't be right, but I think there is some food for thought.

My guess is that there is some genetic reason that needs to be pointed out, but there has to be a trigger of some sort too. Be it environmental or something else. Often, type 1 is diagnosed right after a regular flu, so maybe there is a connection between some type of flu and type 1. Or it could be something like a mosquito bite. These are some of the crazy theories I've heard over the years..

Type 2 also needs to have some genetic reason, I think, because not everyone is being diagnosed with the condition even if they were living the same way.

jujub
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 10392
   Posted 8/26/2010 7:32 AM (GMT -7)   
It's been pretty busy this summer. We have had house guests, then I got an infection (cellulitis) in my leg, then I was sick for three weeks from the antibiotics. Since then I've been busy living my life.

A new thing I found - how stupid of me not to think of it sooner: if you eat bread, take your small hamburger bun, cut about 1/4 off the side, then split the top. Eat only the top half of it, throw the rest of the top away. Cuts the carbs almost in half. Also, the sandwich rounds are good and only half as much bread.

Blood sugars hovering in the teens, feeling good and exercising a lot. I've had to spend a fortune on new clothes. They're two sizes smaller and still a bit loose!
Ulcerative colitis diagnosed 2001. In remission with Remicade since 2006.
Graves disease with hyperthyroidism, successfully treated with radioactive iodine.
Arthritis with global joint pain.

Co-moderator thyroid forum

Chaul22
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2010
Total Posts : 200
   Posted 8/26/2010 10:54 AM (GMT -7)   
Kramden said...
So, the higher the blood glucose the better chance you would have of surviving in freezing temperatures.


Did the study you read give you ranges of bg levels that would be acceptable for various degrees of temperature - or specific regions around the country that would be advisable for them to live?




Nah, it's more in evolutionary line of thought, I think. They (or he?) were trying to claim that blood glucose works like glycol in cooling liquids preventing freezing and that some disease gave the "sick" an evolutionary advantage. But still, I would have thought that the high blood glucose would cause more damage than the slightly cooler climate. Oh, I think I found the origin of the story. It's mentioned in a book by certain Sharon Moalem. Sounds like a wild theory with not much backing if you ask me. You can find the book, and some blogs questioning the book, via search engines...
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