Needle Disposal

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Joe S
New Member


Date Joined Jun 2005
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 6/23/2005 12:13 PM (GMT -7)   
Do you know about the bill in congress H.R. 2841 which will pay for Sharps Disposal for Patients with Diabetes. What do some of you currently do with your sharps? Did anyone read the new EPA guidelines for disposal of Sharp?

I want to know what liabilities I have when one of my sharps go into the trash. I was told, if my trash worker gets stuck with my needle I am the liable party and would have to pay damages, lost wages, etc.
 
Joe
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Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 6/27/2005 10:44 AM (GMT -7)   
Joe,

Check with your county health department. Ours has a sharps disposal routine that includes a red, biohazard box (for free) to put the needles in and when full we turn it in there and they give us a new one. If you don't have a sharps disposal progam in your area then using a metal can with a lid (coffee can) should be fine. Just be sure to wrap it in newspaper about 5 pages thick and tape it well when you dispose of it. Never just toss a used syringe into the trash either in your home or a public restroom! Anyone who comes in contact with it will need to have lots of painful, scary and expensive testing done to be sure they haven't contracted anything from it. Also, be sure to replace the needle cap when you have finished using the syringe. This is the first responsible step to safeguarding others. Hope this helps.
~ Jeannie

"As one goes through life one learns if you don't paddle your own canoe you don't move."
-Katherine Hepburn


Joe S
New Member


Date Joined Jun 2005
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 7/5/2005 9:46 AM (GMT -7)   
In my local area they do not take the used needles at any community sites. Putting the needles into a coffee can is out of the question according to the new EPA standards (which means it's law).
 
Here's what the EPA has to say
Washington, D.C., (December 16, 2004) - The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued new recommendations on disposal of used syringes generated at-home, a move that may ultimately change the way the Americans dispose of used syringes. The new recommendations no longer suggest residents throw their used needles in the garbage, but encourage disposal of their used needles through other means; such as, community drop-off programs, household hazardous waste facilities, sharps mailback programs or at-home needle destruction devices.
 
 
Joe

Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 7/6/2005 12:32 PM (GMT -7)   
Joe,
I went to the EPA site, last updated in April and they are 'encouraging' the local communities to "... evaluate and promote alternative disposal methods for used needles and other medical sharps." It's not a law yet. They have tons of information on how to contact them and find local needle disposal means and methods in your area. Please visit the site at:

US EPA Medical Wastes

I'm sure you can find something there to guide you in contacting your local agencies for help. Good luck.
~ Jeannie

"As one goes through life one learns if you don't paddle your own canoe you don't move."
-Katherine Hepburn


"Head over toes and UP she goes!" ~Maryclare, PTA


effie
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2005
Total Posts : 344
   Posted 7/7/2005 3:08 AM (GMT -7)   
Dear Joe,
I live in Canada. We are also not allowed to simply put them in the trash.

I carry an empty film roll in my purse to use if I am out, for the used needles and lancets and strips used in the glucometre. I use a pen needle so size is not a problem.
I have three options at home. I can go to the local waste management cente centre for a special biohazard disposal unit, like the one Jeannie described, or I can take them to the local drug store for proper disposal, or I can even bring them to some doctor's office for disposal.

It sounds to me like Jeannie's idea of a coffee can should be fine, and it used to be fine here. However over the past year the law has changed.

It makes it difficult. But I do understand the concerns of the garbage people. My guess is that most diabetecs do dispose of them carefully. I know sometimes my hubby does my insulin and he has left the used needle on the sideboard of the bedroom. Then it may fall. I have stepped on one and boy does it hurt!!!!

Hope you find a solution. It sounds like Jeannie gave you some great info. Way to go Jeannie, you deserve a new crown.

Sincerely,
Judy

Post Edited (effie) : 7/7/2005 4:42:42 AM (GMT-6)


effie
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2005
Total Posts : 344
   Posted 7/7/2005 3:37 AM (GMT -7)   
Dear Joe,

Here is some info I found on our local waste management web site. I have summarized it and removed the area etc. However, it sounds like this has come into effect January of this year and most likely would be in place in most areas of Ontario, Canada.

Do not ever dispose of needles, syringes and lancets (sharps) in your garbage or recycling box.

Needles, syringes and lancets can pose a risk to you and others including pets, if not disposed of properly.

Recycling Centres will only accept sharps in approved biohazard container. Biohazard containers are free of charge. Disposal is also free, providing the sharps are in the approved and visibly labelled biohazard waste containers. This has been done in order to protect family members, waste collectors, pets and others who may come in contact with your sharps. Do not throw out your sharps in the regular curbside waste.

Our containers are yellow with a red lid and red writing.

Thanks for making me think about this again Joe.

I wonder if there are any services in place for disabled persons, who can not make it to the local community waste centre.

You have brought this to my attention, however I did not realize that it was required, I just thought it was responsible behaviour.

I hope other people read this post and think twice.
Thanks for sharing Joe and Jeannie
Judy

shana
New Member


Date Joined Jun 2005
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 7/7/2005 5:26 PM (GMT -7)   
Joe, Whoever prescribes the insulin for you should have a sharps container for you. i get mine at the hospital where I get my insulin and when the container is full I bring it back to the hospital where they dispose of them. I wonder if you can obtain a sharps container at your local pharmacy and I would also ask the pharmacy how to dispose of them when the container is full. I dont think that you are supposed to put sharps in a coffeecan and then put them out in the local trash collection. Call your county recyclers and ask what to do with them, but I would go with disposal at the hospital if you can. Good luck.

shana

Pin Cushion
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2003
Total Posts : 442
   Posted 7/9/2005 3:48 PM (GMT -7)   
My Pharmacy takes them as long as they are in a red sharps container. I dont have to pay for disposal but I do have to buy the container about 6 bucks.
Sigmoid Colostomy / Crohns / Type 1 Diabetic / Ostioarthritus / Fibromyalgia / Asthma / High Blood Pressure / High Colesterol / Migraines. Ain't life a joy?



* I think it may be time for a colorful metaphor*

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